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Full text of "The Diocese of Fort Wayne"

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977.2 

A^19d 

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1483492 

GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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lir'i IlirilS IIMlfiTiif , r.tlBLIC LIBRARY 



I 3 1833 01705 7719 
Gc 977.2 AL19D v. 1 

Al_ERDING7 HSRMAN J0BEFH7 

1845-1924. 
The Diocese of Fort Wayne 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/dioceseoffortway01aler 



THE 

DIOCESE 



OF 



FORT WAYNE 



1857— SEPTEMBER 22—1907 



A Book of Historical Reference 
1669-1907 



BY THE 

RT. REV. H. J. ALERDING 



'■''Gather up the fragments that remain^ lest they be lost.'' 



THE ARCHER PRINTING CO. '<Sn^^^^ FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 

1907 



1483492 

CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Preface 5 

Chapter 1. A Bird's-eye view 9 

Chapter II. Northern Indiana within the jurisdiction of 
the Bishops of Quebec, Baltimore, 

Bardstown and Vincennes 21 

Chapter. 1 1 1. The Right Rev. John Henry Luers, D.D. . . 30 

The First Bishop of Fort Wayne. 
Chapter IV. The Right Rev. Joseph Dwenger, 

C. PP. S., D.D 38 

The Second Bishop of Fort Wayne. 
Chapter V. The Right Rev. Joseph Rademacher, D.D. 46 

The Third Bishop of Fort Wayne. 
Chapter VI. The Right Rev. Herman Joseph Alerding, 

D.D 53 

The Fourth Bishop of Fort Wayne. 

Chapter VII. Domestic Prelates of His Holiness 60 

The Right Rev. Mgr. Julian Benoit, V.G. 
The Right Rev. Mgr. John H. Oechtering, V.G. 

Chapter VIII. The Clergy, Diocesan and Regular 64 

Chapter IX. The Churches— Prior to 1857, inclusive. . 200 

Chapter X. The Churches— From 1858 to 1867 266 

Chapter XI. The Churches— From 1868 to 1877 314 

Chapter XII. The Churches— From 1878 to 1887 354 

Chapter XIII. The Churches— From 1888 to 1897 372 

Chapter XIV. The Churches— From 1898 to 1907 390 

Chapter XV. The Missions and Stations 402 

Chapter XVI. The Congregation of Holy Cross, (C.S.C.) 429 
Chapter XVII. The Congregation of the Most Precious 

Blood, (C.PP.S.) 443 

Chapter XVIII. The Religious Communities of Women. . 447 

The Sisters of Holy Cross, Notre Dame, 1843. 
Chapter XIX. The Religious Communities of Women, 

continued 456 

The Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, Fort Wayne, 1863 
Chapter XX. The Religious Communities of Women, 

continued 460 

The Sisters of St. Francis, Lafayette, 1875. 



4 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

PAGE 

Chapter XXI. The Religious Communities of Women, 

continued 464 

The Sisters of St. Joseph, Tipton, 1888. 

Chapter XXII. The Religious Communities of Women, 

continued 467 

1. Sisters of Providence. — 1845. 

2. Sisters of the Most Precious Blood. — 1853. 

3. The School Sisters of Notre Dame. — 1865. 

4. Sisters of St. Agnes.— 1872. 

5. Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred Heart. — 1876. 

6. Felician Sisters of St. Francis. — 1880. 

7. Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. — 1902. 

8. Sisters of St. Dominic. — 1905. 

9. Sisters of St. Francis. — 1906, Maryville. 

Chapter XXIII. Institutions of Charity 475 

The Diocesan Orphan Asylums: 

1. St. Joseph's Asylum, for Boys. 

2. St. Vincent's Asylum, for Girls. 

Chapter XXIV. Institutions of Charity, continued 481 

Hospitals: 

1. St. Joseph's Hospital, at Fort Wayne. — 1869. 
■ 2. St. Elisabeth's Hospital, at Lafayette.— 1875. 

3. St. Joseph's Hospital, at South Bend.— 1882. 

4. St. Joseph's Hospital, at Logansport. — 1893. 

5. St. John's Hospital, at Anderson. — 1894. 

6. St. Margaret's Hospital, at Hammond. — 1898. 

7. St. Roch's Sanitarium, at Fort Wayne. — 1899. 

8. The Holy Family Hospital, at Laporte.— 1900. 

9. The Kneipp Sanitarium, at Rome City. — 1901. 

10. The Sacred Heart Hospital, at Garrett.— 1901. 

11. St. Anthony's Hospital, at Michigan City.— 1903. 

12. St. Ann's Hospital, at Peru. 

Chapter XXV. Institutions of Charity, continued 489 

1. The Old People's Home, at Avilla.— 1876. 

2. St. Anthony's Home for the Aged, at Lafayette.— 

1897. 

Chapter XXVI. Education 491 

Chapter XXVII. Addenda 517 

Index 520 



PREFACE 



I, 



The History of the Church is a record of the mercies of 
God on the human family. Considered in this Hght, the view 
that history is self-glorification is narrow in the extreme, and 
lacks the Christian instinct referring all things to God. The 
same holds good, be it the history of the Church in general, or 
of any portion of it. The purpose always is the glory of God 
and the salvation of souls. Such is the issue, and not the 
individual, not the missionary, not the priest; and therefor 
the Church records should be kept accurately and not with- 
held from publication. Gratitude prompts us to thank and 
glorify the Giver on High. 

Sublime doctrines replenish the priest's mind, heaven- 
born aspirations exhilarate his heart, the salvation of others 
fires his soul with charity; but the example of holy priests, 
zealous, apostolic laborers in the Lord's vineyard stimulates 
him to renewed and enduring activity. To study these men, 
how they lived, labored, suffered and died, will foster within 
him the heroic spirit of these grand characters. The laity is 
similarly affected, when they read how the laity, not more than 
two generations ago, brought exacting sacrifices, underwent 
severe hardships of travel in heat and cold, for miles and miles, 
over almost impassable roads, without breaking their fast, to 
confess, and to receive, and to assist at the Holy Sacrifice, 
and once more to hear the word of God preached to them. 
The Catholic of the twentieth century can appreciate the 
changed conditions only, by learning how the parishes, now 
prosperous and flourishing, were organized; how the church- 
buildings developed from the rude frame or log structure to the 
magnificent edifices of today; what hardships and sufferings, 
even the little ones had to undergo, to receive a Christian 
education. And the lives of hundreds of priests and thousands 
of noble lay-men will more than compensate for the scandalous 
conduct of a few. 

These and similar considerations suggested the usefulness 
of the present work, and prompted its publication. It is a 



6 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

plain statement of facts made on reliable authority. Its 
defects are glaring, for the reason that hardly in a single instance 
all the information that was wanted, could be obtained. No 
effort was made to conceal these defects beneath glowing ver- 
biage and glittering generalities. The priests, the religious and 
several of the laity of the diocese have made this history 
possible by freely giving their assistance. Without the assist- 
ance of Rev. Wm. C. Miller, who spent nearly one year on it, 
the history would not have been undertaken. He is deserving 
the full credit, and the gratitude of all who appreciate what 
has been accomplished in preserving these records of the dio- 
cese. The reader is requested to note the defects whether of 
commission or omission and communicate the same to us for 
future use. 

II. 

This history has been in preparation since December 18, 
1905, when the following circular was sent to the priests of 
the diocese, with the request that the historical data be fur- 
nished within six months: 

"A. The history of your place before it had a church. If 
the name of the place was changed at any time, give the change 
or changes. Record the visits of the earliest missionaries to 
your place or district. When did it become a STATION, that 
is to say a place without a church, regularly visited? Who 
were these visiting priests? Where did they reside? Give 
some interesting particulars of this period. Were there any 
note-worthy lay-men? What was the number of souls at this 
time? What was the complexion of the Catholic population 
as to nationality? 

"B. Thehistory of your place when it became a MISSION, 
that is to say, when it became a place with a church regularly 
attended. What priests had charge of it during this time? 
Where did they reside? In each case, if possible, give the year, 
month and day when they took charge and when they ceased 
to have charge of the mission. When was the first church 
built? Describe this church. Who was the priest in charge 
at the time of the building of the church? What was its cost? 
How was the money raised? Give interesting particulars of 
this period. Were there any note-worthy lay-men, with 



Preface, Continued. 7 

reference especially, to the founders of the parish? What was 
the number of souls at this time? 

"C. The history of your parish: 1. The church grounds. 
How much ground has the church? When was the ground 
acquired? Was it secured at one time or different times? 
What was the cost? What priest or priests had charge at the 
time of these purchases? Where did these priests reside? 
2. The church. When was it built? Who was the priest at 
the time? Describe the church, the style of architecture, the 
decorations, the furniture, etc. How much did it all cost? 
How was the money raised? Have improvements been made 
on the church since its erection? What were they? When 
were they made? What did they cost? Who was the priest 
at the time? What is the seating capacity of the church? If 
the present church is not the first church, then give the history 
of the former church or churches. 3. The school. When 
was it built? Who was the pastor at the time? Give the 
dimensions of the building. Its capacity for school purposes. 
How much did it cost? How was the money raised? Have 
improvements been made since? What were they? When 
were they made? At what cost? Who was the pastor? 
4. The teachers. Who teaches the school? Are the teachers 
male or female? Are they lay or religious? If religious, of 
what community? How many teachers? What grades are 
taught? Is there a high school or academy? How is the school 
supported? What is the attendance at school? Where do the 
teachers reside? If in a house specially for them, when was 
this house built? What did it cost? Who was pastor? What 
improvements since? When made? At what cost? Under 
what pastor? 5. The priest's house. When was it built? 
Who was the priest in charge? What was the cost? Have 
improvements been made since? Is the present house the first? 
If not then give the facts, dates, etc., concerning the former 
house or houses. 6. If your church property has still other 
church buildings, mention them, giving full information con- 
cerning the time of their erection, their cost, their purpose, 
their improvements, etc., as suggested by the above questions. 
7. Give an account of the cemetery, its area, its cost, and 
other facts. 8. What is the estimated value of your entire 
church property? What is the amount of debt on the same? 



8 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

9. Name the various societies in your parish. Give the dates 
of their organization, their membership, their purpose, the good 
accomplished, and so forth. 10. What is the number of 
famihes and the number of souls in your charge? 11. Mention 
any remarkable or extraordinary events in the history of your 
parish. 12. How many boys of your parish have become 
priests or have entered religious communities? How many 
girls have become sisters? 13. What lay-men have done your 
parish note-worthy services? What were these services? 

"D. Missions and Stations, if you have charge of any 
Missions or Stations in addition to the church of which you are 
the resident pastor, then give information concerning each of 
them, such as is suggested by the foregoing questions. 

"E. The priests. Give a complete list of the priests who 
served the Catholic people of your place or of your district in 
the early missionary days, and of priests who visited your place 
when it was a station, and of priests who attended the same 
when it became a mission, and of the priests who became the 
resident pastors. Give the dates on which their labors began 
and ended. It would be an act deserving special commenda- 
tion, if a brief biographical sketch of each of these priests were 
given. If your parish has or has had assistant priests the 
names, dates, and brief biography of them is wanted. 

"F. Above all, give your own biography." 



CHAPTER I. 

INTRODUCTORY. 

(a bird's eye view.)* 

Indiana furnishes an excellent theme for history. The 
little French colony on its soil grew around the forts, thrown 
up by France as outposts, to protect the Illinois country and 
the Mississippi. The more exposed lines, extending from 
Niagara to Fort Duquesne, were simply military posts, around 
which scarcely a sign of settlement arose. 

The pioneer of the valley of the Wabash was, in all prob- 
ability, Robert Cavalier, Sieur de LaSalle. Doubt has long 
hung over his earlier explorations, about the year 1670; but 
the studies of our best antiquarian topographer. General John 
S. Clark, of Auburn, embracing every known document and 
map bearing on the point, leave little doubt that, about 1670, 
LaSalle passed from Lake Erie up the Maumee, crossed to the 
Wabash, and descended it till he became discouraged, and his 
men deserted. He was seeking the great river, called by the 
Iroquois, Ohio, and by the Western Algonquin tribes, the Mis- 
sissippi. Marquette subsequently passed the mouth of the 
Ohio, which he called by its Algonquin name, Ouabouskigou, 
the origin of our Wabash. There is no trace, in the "Jesuit 
Relations," which were printed down to 1672, of any knowledge 
of the Wabash river, or the shores of Lake Erie. The "Rela- 
tions," prepared for the ensuing years to 1679, which I printed 
from the old manuscripts, in all that they say of missionaries 
employed in the West, make it evident that no Jesuit ever 
reached the Wabash, before 1680. The early maps of Joliet, 
their friend, and the companion of Marquette, do not indicate it. 

Marquette and Allouez reached the Illinois villages by the 
way of the Chicago river and the Desplaines; and the Recollects 
with LaSalle did so by the way of the St. Joseph's. During 

* "Diocese of VIncennes, Indiana. Its History, by Rev. H. Alerdinp. genially ap- 
preciated by the historian of the Catholic Church in the United States, John Gilmary bhea. 
New York Freedman Journal, January 26 and February 2, 1884. 



10 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

LaSalle's personal occupation of the Illinois country, Father 
Allouez kept aloof, as the great explorer was bitterly hostile 
to the Jesuits: but after he went back to France, the missionary 
was welcomed at the fort, in the Illinois country, by Chevalier 
Tonti. He subsequently founded a mission on the St. Joseph's, 
where wandering Miamis and Pottawottamies had gathered 
from Green Bay, in which district he had long ministered to 
them and the Maskoutens. The Marquis de Denonville, on 
the 1st of October, 1686, granted to Father Claude Dablon, 
Superior of the Jesuit Missions in Canada, a tract of land, 
twenty arpents in front on the St. Joseph's River and of equal 
depth, at such point as he might select, for a chapel and resi- 
dence. A modest chapel and mission house rose twenty-five 
leagues from the mouth of the river, and here Father Claude 
Allouez died, August 27-8, 1689, and his remains, not im- 
probably, repose within the limits of Indiana. Fathers Ave- 
neau, Gravier and Chardon continued the St. Joseph's Mission, 
till hostility between the French and the Miamis prevented 
their labors for a time. 

In 1719 Fort Ouiatenon grew up among the Ouiatenons 
or Weas, another Miami tribe on the north bank of the Wabash, 
below the present Lafayette. Father Mermet had been their 
missionary, and may have labored here. Then Fort Miami 
was established where Fort Wayne now stands and finally, in 
1733, the Poste au Ouabache, which soon took the name of 
its active commandant, a Canadian gentleman, John Babtiste 
Bissot, called from a seigneury he owned in Canada, Sieur de 
Vincennes. He had long been active in Western affairs, was 
brother-in-law to Louis Joliet, the discoverer of the Missis- 
sippi, and died nobly in an unfortunate campaign against the 
Chickasaws. 

A chapel, dedicated to St. Francis Xavier, was erected at 
this last post, and there seems to have been chapels at Fort 
Miami and at Fort Ouiatenon. On the 22nd of July, 1741, a 
child was born at the last of these, who received in baptism the 
name of Anthony Foucher. This boy was destined to be the 
first native of the Wabash Valley, or indeed of the Western 
country, who was raised to the priest-hood. He was ordained 
by the Bishop of Quebec, October 30, 1774, and before he died, 
in 1812, a Bishop, from the Southern bank of the Ohio, was 



. Introductory, Continued. 1 1 

reviving the Faith among his countrymen on the river of his 
birth. 

Our reverend historian of the diocese of Vincennes then 
takes up the earHest Register of Vincennes, opening April 21, 
1749, with the marriage of Juhan Trottier to Josette Marie. 
The officiating clergyman was the Jesuit Father, Sebastian 
Louis Meurin, who continued the labors of Allouez and Mermet. 

Stirring times of wars with England had come, and the 
little posts at Vincennes, Ouiatenon, Kaskaskia, St. Joseph's, 
Prairie du Rocher were filled with tidings of battle and expe- 
dition. The Jesuit Fathers, Vivier, Lamorinie, Foitier, 
Dujaunay, all labored among the French and Indians of 
Indiana, and the line of these pioneer priests of the Society 
closes with Father Julian Duvernay, who officiated at the 
chapel of St. Francis Xavier till 1763. 

Then the flag of France was lowered at all the French posts 
in the West, and English soldiers came to plant, amid these 
French hamlets and their Indian friends, the flag of England. 
It was regarded with sullen discontent, and when Pontiac 
proposed to the Indian tribes a general rising, almost all the 
English forts were captured and destroyed simultaneously. 
Among them perished Fort Ouiatenon. 

Of the state of religion, among these little communities 
of Catholics in the far West, we know but what can be gleaned 
from the parish registers and from lists that have been pre- 
served of those who made their Easter duty; there is very rare 
evidence of immorality; the colonists married young, and if 
jovial, light-hearted and daring, more given to hunt and Indian 
trade, than to patient tilling of the soil, they led moral lives, 
were tolerably regular in their devotions, and the little com- 
munities have no criminal record, no prisons, no deaths by 
violence, no executions. Each little settlement had its notary, 
and he or some other of the better educated read the mass- 
prayers, and catechized the children, when no priest was there 
to offer the Holy Sacrifice. At this time there were some 
eighty or ninety families at Vincennes, fourteen at Ouiatenon 
and nine or ten at the junction of the St. Joseph's and St. 
Mary's. 

The infidel council at New Orleans, in 1762, ordered all 
Jesuit chapels to be razed, and one in Illinois, though on 



12 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

English soil, was actually destroyed. When the English com- 
manders came, the Catholics of Indiana felt despondent. The 
fate of the Acadians, who, born and brought up under the 
English flag, had been deprived of their homes and all they 
possessed, and had been torn from their native land to be 
flung as paupers along the Atlantic coast, was before them. 
A similar fate might be theirs. On the 30th of December, 
1764, a new era seemed to dawn, when Gen. Gage announced 
in a proclamation, that the King of England granted to his 
new Catholic subjects in the Illinois' country, liberty to enjoy 
their religion undisturbed. 

The people at Vincennes then sought to obtain a priest; 
but the Bishop of Quebec, cut off from supply of clergymen 
from France, deprived of the Jesuits and Recollects, who were 
doomed to extinction, could not fmd priests to fill nearer 
pressing wants. It was not till 1769, that the Rev. Peter 
Gibault reached the Illinois country. At Vincennes, and the 
adjoining missions, there were some 800 souls. They received 
the priest with joy; marriages were solemnized, the children 
privately baptized were christened with due ceremonies. The 
Mission was one to attract him, with its orchard and gardens, 
but his field of labor included also the Missions in Illinois, and 
his visits to Vincennes were made at stated intervals. 
+ In 1772, the little Catholic community in the Wabash 
valley were startled by an order of Gen. Gage, which seemed 
to prelude a new Acadian outrage. They were all commanded 
to leave the settlements; when they protested against the cruel 
order, he demanded the title deeds of the lands they held. It 
was evident, that it was the purpose to drive the Catholic 
settlers from British soil, doubtless to gratify the bitter anti- 
Catholic feeling in the English colonies at the East. 

But the Parliament of Great Britain, on the 2nd of June, 
1774, passed a law which precipitated the American Revolu- 
tion, by arousing all the bigotry of the colonies. This was 
the "Quebec Act," by which the people of Canada were per- 
mitted to retain their French laws and customs, and the 
Catholic Church was maintained in all its rights. The French 
settlements at the West, in our present Michigan, Indiana, 
Illinois and Wisconsin, were by the act included in the province 
of Quebec. The Church there was thus formally recognized 



Introductory, Continued. 13 

by the English Government, an'd the right of the Bishop of 
Quebec to appoint priests, of the priests to receive tithes, was 
guaranteed by law. The oath of allegiance required to be 
taken was such, as Catholics could lawfully take, not such a 
one as was tendered to the Acadians, who were condemned as 
Popish Recusants. 

This guarantee of religious freedom filled the Catholics on 
the Detroit, the Wabash, the Illinois and Mississippi with joy; 
but by the people of the English colonies, it was regarded in 
the light of a grievous and bitter wrong. It is denounced in 
our Declaration of Independence as an act of pretended legis- 
lation "for abolishing the free system of English laws in a 
neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary govern- 
ment, and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render it at once 
an example and a fit instrument, for introducing the same 
absolute rule into these colonies." 1 cannot find that in the 
legislation or judicial decisions of those Western States, this 
act has ever been recognized as having been in force, but it 
certainly was at least till July 4, 1776, when the severing of 
all allegiance to England may have modified the condition of 
affairs; but this is a question for constitutional lawyers to 
decide. 

When the Revolution broke out, the English Government, 
which had appointed Indian agents, controlled the various 
tribes of red men, and used them against the thirteen States; 
and it became important to destroy this influence. The Con- 
tinental Congress had no resources, but Virginia claimed the 
country, northwest of the Ohio, as part of her territory. In 
the summer of 1778, an expedition from Virginia, under Colonel 
George R. Clark appeared before Kaskaskia, after a brave and 
hardy march. The French settlers and their priest, Rev. Peter 
Gibault, received him without opposition; and Clark, by the 
aid of this clergyman and of Colonel Vigo, a Spanish settler 
there, reduced Vincennes, capturing the British commandant. 

Indiana thus became part of Virginia, and came within 
the sway of Congress. The people took the oath of allegiance 
to the Commonwealth of Virginia, and its laws were extended 
over all the territory. 

Virginia had been fiercely anti-Catholic; its colonial statute 
book teems with penal laws against the Catholics, and one may 



14 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

be cited as a sample, which put the testimony of a CathoHc 
on a par with that of a negro slave, something not to be received 
in a court of justice. In Virginia a man might with impunity 
kill another in presence of a Catholic or a slave. 

This old spirit soon showed itself; for shortly after the 
temporary Government was organized by Colonel Todd, the 
French settlers were, as under Gage, summoned to produce 
the titles by which they held their lands. Yet, amid the un- 
easiness produced by this hostile act, the Catholic settlers did 
not waver in their new allegiance, but bore their part in the 
struggle. In the autumn of 1780, LaBalme, with a party 
including many from Vincennes, captured the British post, 
Kekionga, on the Maumee, and died bravely soon after, over- 
powered by numbers, at the River a-Boite. 

In 1781, Virginia relinquished to Congress the territory 
northwest of the Ohio, and the deed confirmed the French 
titles, including those of the churches in Indiana, Illinois and 
Michigan. 

The course pursued by the Rev. Peter Gibault, cut him 
off from all aid or recognition in Canada, so that he had to 
struggle on alone, reduced with his people to great penury, by 
their sacrifices for the national cause. During the long interval 
from 1779 to 1784, he was unable to visit Vincennes. He came 
at last with Rev. Payet, and revived religion once more. The 
next year he took up his abode at Vincennes, built a new log 
church, ninety feet long by forty-two broad, the old church 
being remodeled for his residence. Here he remained till the 
nth of October, 1789. 

Meanwhile, the treaty of Paris, in 1783, had recognized 
the independence of the United States, with its territory ex- 
tending to the eastern bank of the Mississippi; and the clergy 
in Maryland and Pennsylvania, who had at first, from fear of 
offending Protestant prejudice against Bishops, deprecated the 
appointment of one, had solicited that a Bishop should be 
placed over them. Pope Pius the Sixth, in 1784, appointed 
the Rev. John Carroll, Prefect Apostolic; but the pastor at 
Vincennes was a stranger amid the clergy in the United States, 
while he was under the ban in Canada, where the Bishop had 
excommunicated all who joined the Americans, and still refused 
the sacraments to all, who had not remained faithful to the 



Introductory, Continued. 15 

British cause. Yet, the northwest territory was still part of 
the Diocese of Quebec, although the Bishop exercised no juris- 
diction. This unfortunate condition of affairs lasted, till the 
erection of the See of Baltimore by Pope Pius VI., November 
6, 1789, when in express terms he directed "all the clergy and 
people dwelling in the aforesaid United States of America, 
though hitherto they may have been subject to other Bishops 
of other dioceses, to be henceforward subject to the Bishop of 
Baltimore." The Bishop of Quebec, though protesting pro 
forma against a division of his diocese without his knowledge, 
gladly relinquished all claim and jurisdiction over a district, 
whose spiritual wants he had neither inclination nor power to 
supply. 

Down to this period, the territory of the subsequently 
erected diocese of Vincennes was under the ecclesiastical law 
of France, as held in Canada. The priest received his tithes, 
the decrees of the Council of Trent were regarded as published 
as much as in Canada — the same holy days of obligation and 
fast days were observed as on the banks of the St. Lawrence. 

The diocese of Baltimore, as established by the Holy See, 
included the whole territory then belonging to the United 
States, and recognized by the treaty of Paris, in 1783. Its 
Western limit was the Mississippi; Florida with the Gulf shore, 
Louisiana, and all the territory west of the Mississippi, were 
in the hands of Spain; over it the Archbishop of Santiago de 
Cuba had, since 1776, extended his ecclesiastical jurisdiction, 
and through a Bishop Auxiliary he was endeavoring to bring 
in the discipline of the Church. 

Bishop Carroll with few priests, no seminary, no institu- 
tions of any kind, found himself unable to meet the calls, that 
came from all parts of the vast country, confided to him. 
Natchez was visited by the Spanish ecclesiastics of New Orleans ; 
but the Northwest was destitute of priests. 

That district had another difficulty. The bigotry of John 
Jay, in 1775, prevented Canada from joining the thirteen 
colonies; the same feeling made him, in 1786, an indifferent 
diplomatist, when Franklin was willing to make any concession 
to induce England to yield it to us. England retained Canada 
not only, but for years maintained her military possession of 
Detroit, and her influence over the Indian tribes of the West^ 



16 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

whom she incited to hostility against the Americans. The 
CathoHcs of the North-West were true; Hving from infancy in 
intimate relations with the various nations, they knew their 
language, their disposition, their ideas. But for their aid as 
agents, interpreters, deputies, the United States Government 
would have been powerless in the West. 

But the want of priests was felt by all. The storm of the 
French revolution sent, at the opportune moment, a number 
of learned, zealous priests to this country. One of these, the 
Rev. Benedict Joseph Flaget, was sent by Bishop Carroll to 
Vincennes soon after his arrival, in 1792. Travel was slow and 
difficult. It took twenty days to reach Pittsburg from Phila- 
delphia; and to reach Vincennes was often a matter of months. 
The good priest arrived at his ruinous log chapel, in season to 
celebrate Mass at Christmas, after restoring the tottering altar, 
and giving the church such renovation and decoration as time 
and means permitted. There was a community of 700, but in 
the long period when no priest was there, so great had indiffer- 
ence grown, that only twelve approached the Sacraments, at 
the great Solemnity. He went to work, however, with the zeal 
which characterized him through his long Apostolic career, and 
was consoled with seeing that the majority became commun- 
icants, just reversing the numbers that shocked him on his 
arrival. He opened a school, encouraged industry, thrift and 
charity. The neighboring Indians also received his care, and 
his labors during the ravages of the small-pox completely 
prostrated him. Having been recalled to Baltimore, he left 
Vincennes in the spring of 1795. 

To replace him, Bishop Carroll sent the Rev. John Francis 
Rivet, who had arrived from Spain in December, 1794. Wash- 
ington had seen the happy influence of Father Flaget over the 
Indians, and wished a priest to aid the Government in carrying 
out a beneficent policy, v^^hich would tend to their civilization, 
and who would teach them the advantages of the Christian 
religion. Father Rivet's offer of his services was accepted; he 
was directed to establish himself on the Wabash, and a salary 
allotted to him. Though the Government long neglected to 
pay this sum, needed for his support, Father Rivet, says 
Bishop Carroll, "applies himself incessantly in fulfilling the 
objects of his appointment, and disposing the Indians to main- 



Introductory, Continued. 17 

tain a friendly temper towards the United States. He is in- 
defatigable in instructing them in the principles of Christianity, 
and not without success." The historian of the diocese of 
Vincennes shows, from the records, to how many different 
tribes his zealous care extended. By any one who remembers, 
how those Indians, under English influence, made war on this 
country, defeated St. Clair and Harman, and yielded to Gen. 
Wayne only after a stubborn fight, the service done the country 
by the Catholic priests and people can be estimated. The 
English Government knew and felt Father Rivet's power, and 
a priest from Canada, a future bishop of Halifax, was sent to 
employ his influence with the Indians, to induce them to make 
no alliance with the Americans. 

Rev. John Francis Rivet became Vicar General in the 
West, in 1798, and continued his labors till he sank under them, 
in 1804. Vincennes was then for years without a settled pastor; 
visited at intervals by Rev. Donatian Olivier from Illinois, and 
by Revs. Baden and Nerinckx from Kentucky. 

When the See of Bardstown was erected, the people of 
Vincennes applied to their old pastor, the newly consecrated 
Bishop of Bardstown, for a priest. He visited them himself 
in 1814, and, with Rev. D. Olivier, remained some time in 
instructing the people so long neglected, and for the first time 
administered the Sacrament of Confirmation in Indiana. He 
visited them again and again, as missionary and as Bishop, 
but it was not until 1818, that Vincennes received a pastor, 
in the person of the Rev. Anthony Blanc, who, during a two 
years' incumbency, not only revived faith at Vincennes, but 
built two log chapels, one at seven miles and the other at twelve 
miles distance. Two other priests assisted him at intervals. 
He was succeeded by Revs. Dahman and Champourier. 

The Catholic Almanac of 1822 thus briefly gives its account 
of the Church in three States, which now form eight dioceses, 
presided over by two Archbishops and six Bishops; "the states 
of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois are daily adding more and more 
to the Church. In each of these, several large congregations 
of Catholics are found. They are chiefly French, who extended 
themselves through parts of this country as early as the 17th 
century. Vincennes, in Indiana, was formerly a station of the 
Jesuits, whence they made excursions among the savage tribes." 



18 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Father Champourier, sent there in May, 1823, describes 
the Church in Vincennes as so "nearly rotten and out of repair, 
that at any httle storm it becomes very dangerous to stay in 
it. Moreover, it is open to every wind and penetrated by every 
drop of rain," and he appealed in the papers to the Catholics 
of the country, for aid in the erecting a more suitable church. 
He was the only resident pastor, with a whole State, and even 
more, for his parish. 

When Bishop Flaget visited Indiana 1829, he found Cath- 
olics at New Albany, the Knobs, Black Oak Ridge and Wash- 
ington. The jubilee granted by Pope Leo XII was proclaimed; 
Mass was offered at all these stations, instructions given, 
marriages and baptisms performed, or revalidated. 

A new Catholicity was thus growing up around the old 
cradle of the faith at Vincennes. So promising did the future 
seem, that Bishop Plaget met Bishop Rosati, of St. Louis, at 
Vincennes in 1832, and after examining the condition of affairs 
and the prospect of an increase by immigration, these two 
great Bishops resolved, to address the Holy See and solicit the 
erection of Indiana into a diocese, with the See at Vincennes; 
and for the mitre they agreed to propose the President of Mt. 
St. Mary's College, the Rev. Simon Gabriel Brute. 

The first of our present series of Catholic Almanacs, that 
published in 1833, gives its account of Indiana so briefly, that 
we may be allowed to copy it in full: "Black Oak Ridge, 
Davies County, Rev. Simon Lalumiere. Mount Pleasant, 
occasionally. Vincennes, 693 m. from Washington. Rev. L. 
Picot." This was all the actual material for the new diocese. 

One of these, apparently the Ven. Father Lalumiere, him- 
self a native of the State, in the spring of 1833 said Mass for 
the four or five Catholic families of Columbus, and preached in 
the Court House; then said Mass at Shelby for ten Catholic 
families. At St. Peter's, in Daviess County, the Sisters of 
Charity, it would seem, had opened a school, and he began to 
talk of a church at Washington, Indiana, and the Bishop who 
was expected. "The Catholic population of Indiana is greater 
than would readily be supposed, and is constantly and rapidly 
increasing," he adds. 

There seemed to be no very encouraging field for a Bishop, 
but the Rev. Dr. Brute resigned his position at Emmitsburg, 



Introductory, Continued. 19 

for which he was so well fitted, *and where as professor and 
president he had produced an indelible impression on the young 
levites, confided to his care. At the call of his Superiors and 
yielding to the judgment of those whom he respected, he 
.assumed the arduous duty of building up a new diocese. He 
had seen the struggles and difficulties of others, and had no 
unfounded hopes. 

The diocese of Vincennes as established by the Holy See, 
in 1834, included the State of Indiana, and also about a third 
of Illinois. Having accepted the Bulls, he made a retreat at 
Bardstown, and was consecrated in the cathedral of St. Louis, 
October 28, 1834, by Bishop Flaget, assisted by Bishops Rosati 
and Purcell. He was welcomed with joy at Vincennes, and 
took possession of his little brick cathedral and his palace, 
which was a one story building, measuring twenty-five feet by 
twelve. He had in his diocese two priests in Indiana, Revs. 
Lalumiere and Ferneding, the latter the pioneer priest of the 
German settlers, and one in Illinois, Rev. J. M. J. St. Cyr, then 
at Chicago. There was, besides. Rev. Badin's Mission at South 
Bend, with the Sisters and an Indian school. 

He made a visitation of his diocese, to discover where 
there were Catholics to be attended, at what points churches 
could be established and maintained. Then, with some 
definite idea of the wants of the diocese, he went to Europe to 
.solicit aid for the flock of all nations gathered in Indiana, old 
French settlers to the "manner born," Americans from Mary- 
land and Kentucky, Irish and Germans. In Europe he pro- 
cured material aid, and appealed to his Breton countrymen for 
priests to aid him. The men of St. Patrick's race did not turn 
a deaf ear to the call; priests came, of sterling qualities, who 
made Indiana the field of their long and untiring labor. How 
the Bishop, after his return, devoted himself to his duties as 
bishop and missionary, our reverend author tells most touch- 
ingly. His short career one of constant visitation, closed in 
June, 1839, in a calm and holy death, fit crown for such a life. 

The Rev. Celestine de la Hailandiere, one of the Breton 
priests who came to Bishop Brute's aid in 1836, had been ap- 
pointed coadjutor, and became the second bishop of Vincennes. 
He was in Europe, at the time of Bishop Brute's death, and 
began his labors for his diocese by sending over priests, vest- 



20 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

ments, sacred vessels. He induced the Eudists to undertake 
a theological seminary at Vincennes, Father Sorin, of the Holy 
Cross, to begin the work at Notre Dame, which God has so 
wonderfully blessed; the Sisters of Providence, to begin that 
institute, which possesses such a special charm of spirituality. 

On reaching his diocese. Bishop de la Hailandiere began 
to introduce system and order; he held a retreat for his clergy, 
followed by a Synod. The erection of the See of Chicago, in 
1844, relieved him of the Illinois portion of his diocese, but his 
energy and activity were of the kind that, directed by another, 
effect great results, but which, when not accompanied by the 
power to direct and employ others, produce discontent and 
confusion. He resigned the See in 1847, and returned to 
Brittany, where he died in May, 1882. By his own desire, his 
remains were brought across the Atlantic by his near kinsman, 
the Rev. E. Audran, to be laid in the Cathedral, which he 
never ceased to love. 

Bishop Bazin, his successor, died in less than six months 
after his consecration; and the mitre of Vincennes was placed 
on the head of the Rev. Maurice de St. Palais, a native of the 
diocese of Montpelier, who had been on the Indiana mission 
since 1836, an earnest laborer, cheerfully enduring hardships 
and perils of no ordinary character. His appointment was 
welcomed by all ; and his first work the establishment of asylums, 
for the care of the orphans. It was to his zeal that Indiana is 
indebted for the introduction of the Benedictine monks, from 
the famous Abbey of Einsiedlen, who made St. Meinrad, so 
well known. 

Bishop de St. Palais' labors in Indiana as priest and bishop 
covered a term of nearly fifty years. It was, therefore, espec- 
ially under his care that religion developed, the administrations 
of his predecessors having been too brief, to do more than plan 
the good they desired to accomplish. 

He died in June, 1877, Bishop of Vincennes, having de- 
clined the appointment of Arch-bishop of Toulouse. He was 
not even Bishop of the whole State of Indiana, the See of Fort 
Wayne having been erected in 1857, which comprised the 
Northern part of Indiana. 



CHAPTER 11. 

NORTHERN INDIANA WITHIN THE JURISDICTION OF THE BISHOPS 
OF QUEBEC, BALTIMORE, BARDSTOWN AND VINCENNES — 
BISHOPS OF QUEBEC, 1674-1789; BISHOP CARROLL OF BAL- 
TIMORE, 1789-1810; bishop flaget of bardstown, 1810- 
1834; bishops brute, de la hailandiere, bazin and de 

ST, PALAIS OF VINCENNES, 1834-1857. 

Naturally, the heads of various orders and religious com- 
munities exercised jurisdiction over their subjects, such as the 
Franciscans, the Dominicans, the Jesuits and others, who 
labored in various regions of this vast country, from the earliest 
days. When, however, the first Bishop of Quebec was installed 
in the year 1674, this Bishop and his successors exercised 
jurisdiction over the territory, now known as Indiana, Michigan, 
Illinois, Maine, Ohio and New York. The British Colonies 
on the Atlantic coast, from New Hampshire to Georgia, in the 
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, were subject to the 
Vicars Apostolic of the London district, England. During 
this time, Florida and Louisiana, embracing all west of the 
Mississippi, belonged to the diocese of Santiago de Cuba; 
Texas was part of the diocese of Guadalajara; New Mexico 
of that of Durango, and California was governed by a Prefect 
Apostolic. 

Pope Pius VI appointed the Rev. John Carroll Prefect 
Apostolic in the United States, in June, 1784; but the juris- 
diction of the Bishop of Quebec continued, until the same Pope 
erected the new See of Baltimore, on November 6, 1789. 
Bishop Carroll was consecrated August 15, 1790, and his 
diocese was made coextensive with the United States. A 
diocesan synod was held at Baltimore, with an attendance of 
twenty-two priests, on November 7, 1791. In 1800, Bishop 
Neale became Bishop Carroll's Coadjutor. On April 8, 1808, 
Pope Pius VII raised Baltimore to the rank of a Metropolitan 
See, and founded the new dioceses of Boston, New York, 
Philadelphia and Bardstown. The Catholic population, at 



22 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

this time, was estimated at about 25,000, with 68 priests, 80 
churches, several rehgious orders and three colleges. Rt. Rev. 
John Carroll was born in Maryland, January 8, 1735. He 
attended the college at St. Omer in Flanders, and entered the 
Society of Jesus at Watton, 1753. He was ordained priest 
in 1761. In June, 1774, he returned to America and labored 
there, as a secular priest, in Maryland and Virginia. He was 
consecrated Bishop, August 15, 1790, and was made Arch- 
bishop in 1808. He died December 3, 1815. Pastoral letters 
show the Bishop caring for his flock; his controversy with 
Wharton and others show his ability in defending the faith 
against assaults. 

Rt. Rev. Benedict Joseph Flaget was born of a widowed 
mother, November 7, 1763, at Coutournat, France. Two years 
old his mother also died, and an aunt took charge of the boy. 
He began his study of philosophy and theology, at the age of 
seventeen, in the Seminary at Clermont, finishing the same at 
Issy, and was ordained priest in 1788. When the French 
Revolution broke up all institutions of learning in France, 
Father Flaget sailed for Baltimore, in 1792. Bishop Carroll 
sent him to Vincennes, Indiana, where he arrived December 
21, 1792. He was recalled to Baltimore in 1795. On Novem- 
ber 4, 1810, he was consecrated Bishop of Bardstown, having 
up to that time been engaged mostly in teaching. He visited 
Indiana several times as Bishop, but whether he came as far 
as the present diocese of Fort Wayne, is not known. Bishop 
David became his Coadjutor in 1819, Bishop Chabrat in 1834, 
and, at the time of his death, it was Bishop Spalding. "He 
died, as he had lived, a saint," says Bishop Spalding, "on Feb- 
ruary 11, 1850." The diocese of Bardstown, when first estab- 
lished, comprised Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio and all the 
Northwest. Our historian Shea says of Bishop Flaget: "No 
Bishop, in this country, has ever been regarded as equalling 
Bishop Flaget in sanctity, in the spirit of prayer, in the ardor 
of his devotion, his firmness, patience and constant devotion 
to all the duties of his State." A number of seemingly well- 
authenticated miraculous cures were ascribed to Bishop Flaget, 
while visiting France. An account of these cures, bearing 
every evidence of a miraculous nature, was given in "The 
Record," published at Louisville, under dates of January 26 



i6y4 — i8^j, Continued. 23 

and February 2, 1905. It was in 1841 Bishop Flaget's See 
was transferred from Bardstown to Louisville. 

The diocese of Vincennes was established in 1834. It 
comprised Indiana, and Illinois east of a line from Fort Massac 
along the Eastern boundaries of Johnson, Franklin, Jefferson, 
Marion, Fayette, Shelby and Mann Counties to the Illinois 
river, eight miles above Ottawa, and thence to the Northern 
boundary of the State. 

The Rt. Rev. Simon Gabriel Brute de Remur was born 
at Rennes, the capital of Brittany, in France, on March 20, 
1779. The untimely death of his father threw the responsi- 
bility of his education on his mother, a woman of strong Chris- 
tian character. How well she succeeded may be learned from 
the Bishop's reminiscences referring to his first Communion, 
where he says: "\ thank Thee, O my God, for the state of 
innocence and piety I was in the day I performed this most 
important act. My heart is full when I think of that day — 
thanks, thanks, O my God!" A retentive memory, a lively 
imagination, and close application made him a ripe and ac- 
complished scholar. He was well advanced in his studies, 
having become familiar with Latin and Greek, when the 
revolution broke out. During this reign of terror, unhappy 
France was deluged with the blood of her best and noblest 
sons. He witnessed it all. Having entered the medical 
college in 1796, he graduated 1803. In the same year, however, 
he gave up the practice of medicine and entered the Seminary 
of St. Sulpice, at Paris. Five years of earnest and brilliant 
studies in theology, brought him to the gates of the sanctuary, 
and he was ordained priest in 1 808. Following Bishop Flaget 
to America, he landed at Baltimore on August 10, 1810. He 
was there made president of St. Mary's College, and donated 
it his library of 5,000 volumes. We are told, "He was an 
oracle of learning to the clergy and bishops of the country. 
Indeed, from his secluded home in the mountain, his influence 
was felt throughout the entire Church of America," — the 
influence of a learned and holy man. 

He was consecrated Bishop of Vincennes, October 28, 
1834, at St. Louis by Bishop Flaget, assisted by Bishops Rosati 
and Purcell, He was duly installed on November 5, by the 
same Bishops, at Vincennes. What he found in his diocese 



24 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

was: Two priests, a cathedral of four brick walls and roof 
unplastered and unwhitewashed, without sanctuary, a resi- 
dence of a single room 25x12 feet, a revenue of $100 pew rent 
per annum, and a subscription list of $240 for his support. 
A visitation of his diocese revealed to him the great need of 
priests, and means to erect churches, and to supply these he 
visited France. After incredible hardships and labors, he died 
June 26, 1839, of consumption, the result of a severe cold caught 
while riding on the outside of a coach, in Ohio, on his way to 
the Council at Baltimore. His remains rest in the crypt of 
the Cathedral of Vincennes. 

It must be of great interest to the reader, to ascertain the 
status, in those days, of what is now the diocese of Fort Wayne. 
We can do no better, in this respect, than to quote from Bishop 
Brute's letter to the Leopoldine Association for the propagation 
of the faith, giving a full account of his first episcopal visitation 
in his diocese: "I went North in Illinois as far as Chicago 
on Lake Michigan. Rev. St. Cyr had arrived there from St. 
Louis, and enabled the Catholics to make their Easter Com- 
munion, so 1 gave only a few Confirmation. Chicago is now 
composed of about four hundred souls, French, Canadians, 
Americans, Irish, and a good number of Germans. From 
Chicago we went around the end of Lake Michigan to the 
river St. Joseph, and the mission of the Rev. de Seille, at the 
Indian village at Pokegan, situated just outside of our diocese, 
and in that of Detroit. This mission was established, many 
years ago, by the Venerable Father Badin. Father de Seille 
has lived three or four years at Pokegan. On Thursday 
evening we arrived at South Bend, a little town beautifully 
situated on the high banks of the St. Joseph river. It is 
growing rapidly, owing to its many advantages. Crossing the 
river, we visited St. Mary of the Lake, the mission house of the 
excellent Father Badin, who has lately moved to Cincinnati. 
He had a school there kept by two Sisters, who have also gone 
away, leaving the place vacant. The 625 acres of land attached 
to it, and the small lake named St. Mary's, make it a most 
desirable spot and one soon, I hope, to be occupied by some 
prosperous institution. Rev. Badin has transferred it to the 
Bishop on the condition of his assuming the debts, a trifling 
consideration compared with the importance of the place. On 



16^4 — f^^j, Continued. 25 

Friday morning we left for the Tippecanoe river, and the 
village of Chickagos. The Indians had heard of our coming, 
and had sent some of their number in advance, to ascertain 
our movement. They gave notice of our approach to others, 
who had camped out a few miles to wait for the Bishop, and 
to make a more worthy escort for him. The chief of the 
Chickagos was there and directed the movements. Coffee had 
been prepared at the small village, only three miles from the 
principal one. We dismounted, and sitting on mats of woven 
straw partook of their kind cheer. Then we crossed the river 
and soon arrived. 

"Chickagos village is not so large as Pokegan, yet the chapel 
is nearly as large. It is however without ceiling, and without 
a room for the missionary overhead. The mission being of 
later standing. Father de Seille had baptized only about 120 
persons, of whom 1 confirmed sixteen. Our interpreter was a 
Canadian woman seventy years of age, a truly deserving person. 
On our arrival all assembled in the chapel and Father de Seille 
introduced me as their Bishop, the head in these parts of all 
the other Black Robes. On Sunday morning, Father de Seille 
and myself sat upon two little stools in the chapel, and some 
twelve of the leading men came in and took their seats upon 
some of the opposite benches. Chickagos made the speech and, 
having expressed his confidence in Father de Seille and in me, 
he said he would present me with half a section, 320 acres of 
their land. Having replied through the interpreter, we pre- 
pared for Mass and Confirmation. Before Mass six children 
were baptised by me. We slept on the benches of the chapel, 
and some of the straw from the floor, wrapt up in our great- 
coats, after the manner of the good Father. Our food was 
boiled corn, fish, venison, and wild turkey, minced together in 
one dish, and some cranberries broken and mixed with sugar, 
they got from trees. Our drink was water, coffee was not to 
be had, although this was the principal village. I was to 
leave them after vespers, so before we began they came to sign 
the deed of the land, presented to the Church, which we had 
drawn up in as legal a form as we could. After a few parting 
words, and giving them my blessing, we mounted our horses 
and were escorted for some miles by a large number, Chickagos 
at their head, who before leaving us dismounted from their 



26 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

horses, and asked their Bishop's blessing again. We spent the 
night at the house of a settler, fifteen miles from Chickagos, 
and found the house so full that many had to lie on the floor, 
as I had done once on my way to the lake. Here we had a 
bed for two, as was often the case. Through all that journey 
of 600 miles, we seldom came to any regular taverns, but almost 
every family would allow you to share their meals, and give 
you a place under their roof. 

"The day after we reached Logansport, a rapidly improving 
town on the canal, that is nearly completed and will unite the 
Wabash with the Maumee at Fort Wayne, and thus Lake Erie 
with the Ohio and the Mississippi, through the States of Indiana 
and Illinois. I found there a good number of Catholics, and 
promised to send them one of the first priests I could obtain. 
I said Mass the next morning and then left for home, yet some 
days' journey, passing through Fayetteville, Attica, Covington, 
Terre Haute, etc. Few Catholics are as yet collected in these 
growing towns, but soon there will be more. Shortly after 
my return. Father Lalumiere came home and the account of 
his journey was very consoling. He had found more Catholics 
than I had, and many places ready to receive a priest. In 
three places they had begun to build churches. At Fort Wayne 
they had finished one, 60x30 feet, and the congregation num- 
bered 150 Catholic families. I was happy to send them the 
Rev. M. Ruff from Metz, in France, recently ordained and 
speaking the three languages, French, English and German. 
Of the latter there are a good many living there and in the 
environments. I had ordained Rev. M. Ruif subdeacon and 
deacon before my journey to Chicago, and had sent him to 
the Seminary of St. Louis (St. Mary of the Barrens), to make 
his retreat, and there he was ordained priest by that excellent 
prelate, Doctor Rosati." 

Right Rev. Celestine Rene Lawrence Guynemer de 
LA Hailandiere, the second Bishop of Vincennes, was born 
at Combourg, in Brittany, May 2, 1798, and was baptized the 
same day, this being the time of the revolution, by a priest 
who was concealed in the house. He studied law, to fit himself 
for the magistracy. At the age of twenty-four, attending a 
mission given by the Fathers of the Faith, he resolved to 
renounce the world and the flattering prospects held out to 



11 



i6j4 — ■j857> Continued. 27 

him. He entered the Seminary at Rennes, and was ordained 
at Paris, on May 28, 1825. When Bishop Brute requested the 
Bishop of Rennes, to give him the name of a priest worthy to 
be his Vicar General and Coadjutor, the Abbe de la Halandiere 
was selected. He came to America, in 1836, but two years 
later was again sent to Europe in the interest of the diocese. 
While there busily engaged, information reached him at Paris, 
that Bishop Brute had died, and that he himself had been 
appointed Bishop Brute's Coadjutor. He was consecrated 
Bishop at Paris, by Bishop Forbin Janson, on August 18, 1839, 
and made every exertion to obtain needed aid for his diocese. 
He sent over vestments and sacred vessels for the churches, 
the Eudists to found a college. Fathers and Brothers of the 
Holy Cross, Sisters of Providence. After returning to his 
diocese, one of his first acts was to hold a retreat for his clergy, 
which was followed by a diocesan Synod, in 1844. Bishop 
Hailandiere was a man of restless activity, and his energy 
made him unpopular with many. Aware of this, he visited 
Rome, in 1845, to resign his see, but Pope Gregory XVI induced 
him to return to his diocese, and resume his labors. He did 
so, but the old troubles continued and new ones were added, 
so that in 1847 the Holy Father accepted his resignation. He 
returned to his native country and died on an estate belonging 
to the family, at Triandin, on May 1, 1882. It was his desire 
that his remains be buried beneath the sanctuary of the Cathe- 
dral at Vincennes. His wish was complied with. 

Right Rev. John Stephen Bazin, third Bishop of Vin- 
cennes, was born in 1796, in the diocese of Lyons, France, 
where he entered the priesthood and came as a missionary to 
the diocese of Mobile, in 1830. He labored with great zeal 
and devotedness for the Church, in the city of Mobile, for a 
period of seventeen years. He was Bishop Portier's Vicar 
General. Upon the recommendation of the sixth Provincial 
Council of Baltimore, he was appointed Bishop of X'incennes. 
His consecration took place in the Cathedral at Vincennes, on 
October 24, 1847, Bishop Portier being the Consecrator. He 
issued a pastoral letter, in which he said to his clergy: "Having 
been inured for many years to the labors of a missionary life, 
we feel ready, in spite of our advanced age, to share with you 
all the hardships of the ministry. We are ambitious of no 



28 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

distinction. We expect to find in each of you a friend." But 
in the Providence of God he was almost immediately stricken 
down, and expired on April 23, 1848. 

Right Rev. James Maurice de Long D'Aussac de St. 
Palais, D. D., the fourth Bishop of Vincennes, was born at 
La Salvatat, diocese of Montpelier, France, on November 15, 
1811. He descended from one of the noblest families of France. 
His forefathers fought against the Moors and in the Crusades. 
His friends and relatives entertained well grounded hopes, as 
to the brilliancy of the future awaiting him. He received an 
education such as became a nobleman. The downfall of 
Charles X, and the revolution of 1830, convinced him of the 
vanity of all earthly things. In the twenty-fifth year of his 
age he was ordained priest, by the Archbishop of Paris. 

He heeded the invitation of Bishop Brute, seeking laborers 
for the Lord's vineyard in the wilds of Indiana, and following 
him arrived in Vincennes in 1836. He was assigned to a station 
about thirty-five miles east of Vincennes, where he built St. 
Mary's Church. Not understanding the German, he frequently 
made use of a Lutheran as an interpreter, translating his French 
and English sermon into German. The bulk of the money to 
build St. Mary's Church, was realized from the sale of a herd 
of hogs, which had been donated by the heads of families. 
It is said this was the best herd of hogs ever sold in Daviess 
county. He remained until 1839, when Bishop de la Hailan- 
diere sent him to Chicago. Conditions in Chicago were not 
favorable; he met with much opposition from the dissatisfied 
portion of his flock. They first burnt his little shanty, and for 
two years refused to pay him any money, with the avowed 
purpose of starving him out, but he built St. Mary's Church 
at Chicago, which shortly after, in the year 1844, when Chicago 
was made an episcopal see, became its first cathedral. 

In that same year Father de St. Palais was removed to 
Logansport. He underwent incredible hardships, travelling 
through the wilderness without roads and without meeting a 
human habitation for fifty or a hundred miles. His saddlebags 
contained the requisites for the holy functions, together with 
a little sack of salt and cornmeal for his meals. 

In 1846, Father de St. Palais was sent to Madison, where 
he remained one year only. Bishop Bazin, in 1847, made him 



16^4 — ^^57> Concluded. 29 

his Vicar General and the Superior of the Seminary at Vincennes. 
He was administrator of the diocese from April 23, 1848, until 
January 14, 1849, when Bishop Miles of Nashville consecrated 
Father de St. Palais Bishop of Vincennes. Almost the first 
work which he undertook and brought to a successful issue, 
was the erection of orphan asylums. And the other important 
work was, to look after the Seminary. He paid three visits 
ad limina, the first in 1849, the second in 1859, and the third 
in 1869. In 1844 the diocese of Chicago was established, and 
thereafter the diocese of Vincennes was restricted to Indiana. 
Thirteen years later, in 1857, the Northern half of Indiana was 
made the diocese of Fort Wayne. Bishop de St. Palais had 
been present at the commencement exercises at St. Mary's of 
the Woods, when on the morning of June 28, 1877, at five 
o'clock, he suffered a stroke of paralysis and died peacefully 
on the afternoon of the same day, at four o'clock. His remains 
rest beneath the sanctuary of the Cathedral at Vincennes. 



I 



CHAPTER III. 

THE RIGHT REV. JOHN HENRY LUERS, D. D. 
THE FIRST BISHOP OF FORT WAYNE. 

The Rt. Rev. John Henry Luers, D. D., was born on Sep- 
tember 29, 1819, near the city of Munster, in Westphaha, a 
province of Germany. His parents were devoted CathoHcs. 
Poor in the goods of this world, and desirous of bettering their 
condition in life, the family emigrated in 1833, landing in New 
York on June 7th. Piqua, Ohio, located on the Miami river, 
and being the terminus of the Miami canal, connected Cin- 
cinnati on the Ohio river with Toledo on the Lakes. It was 
here, on a farm in the neighborhood of Piqua, that the Luers 
family settled down. John, however, became clerk and assis- 
tant salesman in a store in town. He was noted for strict 
integrity and attention to business, but alas! he began to neglect 
the exercise of his religion. When on one occasion the young 
clerk was paying his parents a visit, the father was amazed to 
find that his son John had forgotten his prayers. The Bishop 
himself in after life, alluding to this incident, often remarked: 
"The subsequent interview between my father and myself was 
of such a striking nature, that I received sufficient reasons to 
promise to relearn, what I had forgotten. It was a sore lesson, 
but one which I never forgot." 

Having been called by God to serve Him in the sanctuary, 
John soon experienced a great change in his thoughts and 
feelings. His ardent desire was to become a priest. But how 
could he ever hope to acquire the education required, for this , 
exalted station in life. Providence, however, had given him : 
the vocation for the priesthood, and Providence also would i 
provide the means for attaining this end. It is related, that 
when Archbishop Purcell was on his way to Piqua, in order to 
administer Confirmation, he overtook our John walking in the 
same direction. The Archbishop on inquiry fouud, that the 
boy was going to Mass, and invited him to mount and ride withi 
the priest, accompanying him. The Archbishop soon dis- 
covered what was the great desire of the boy's heart, and 



Bishop John Henry Luers, Continued. 31 

encouraged him saying: "Fear not, my son; if God has 
destined you for the sanctuary, and has given you a vocation, 
He will in His wisdom provide the means. But you must 
pray, that God's will may be done." From that moment the 
boy's desire, to devote himself exclusively to the service of 
God, became stronger and stronger. General M. D. Morrison 
one of his companions, afterwards a member of congress in 
Indiana, relates: "Bishop Luers, when quite a boy with us in 
Piqua, suddenly stopped playing with the boys, and this being 
something unusual we often asked, what has become of John 
Luers ? He never comes around with us any more. The 
reply given was: Why, he's got hold of some old Latin books, 
and he is studying them; he is going to be a Catholic priest. 
The next thing I heard of him was, that he had gone off some- 
where to school." 

St. Francis Xavier's Seminary, in Brown county, Ohio, 
conducted by the Lazarists, was the only Alma Mater of Bishop 
Luers. It was Archbishop Purcell, who sent him here as a 
candidate for the priesthood. Bishop Luers did not possess a 
quick or brilliant mind, but rather, what is preferable, a pro- 
found mind. The reports sent, by the superiors of the seminary 
to the Archbishop, were most satisfactory. He thoroughly 
mastered the sciences he applied himself to, and in addition 
he fostered solid piety, and developed an ardent zeal and a 
generous desire to serve God, for the good of his neighbor. 
Archbishop Purcell ordained him subdeacon, in the Cathedral 
at Cincinnati, on All Saints' day, 1846; deacon on the feast of 
St. Charles Borromeo, and on November 11th, of the same 
year, in the twenty-seventh year of his age, he was ordained a 
priest of God. He was the last priest ordained in the old 
seminary in Brown county, which is now St. Martin's Convent 
of the Ursuline Nuns. 

Archbishop Purcell, much impressed with the evident zeal 
of the young priest, gave him charge of St. Joseph's Congre- 
gation, in Cincinnati, which was engaged in the work of the 
erection of a church, the walls of which were half up, but was 
paralyzed by a heavy debt. His advent infused new life into 
the enterprise. It was not long after, when St. Joseph's 
Church was completed, and all the debt paid off. Father 
Luers was indefatigable and untiring in his labors, to build up 



32 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the parish. He experienced in his own person, what, as Bishop 
later on, he often told his priests: "I have somewhere read, 
that more men rust out than wear out; a piece of mechanism is 
more apt to get out of repair, when not employed, than when 
performing its accustomed labor." So convinced was he of 
the importance of Catholic schools, that a substantial school 
house soon arose under his inspiration and direction, and it was 
his custom to visit the schools every day. The Catholic 
Telegraph, under date of July 6, 1871, has this to say: "Under 
his active, zealous care, this large church is rapidly finished, 
and the large debt as rapidly paid. It soon became, under 
his pastoral guidance, one of the largest and most important 
German congregations in the city. In labor, Bishop Luers, 
during the years of his priesthood, was indefatigable. At 
St. Joseph's he has left a most eloquent testimony to his great 
worth. Though he parted from the scenes of his labors years 
ago, his former parishoners treasure, in undimmed remem- 
brance, his name and good work, and speak of him, as if he 
were still walking reverent among them. Several, whom he 
baptized and prepared for their first Communion, are now 
worthy priests of the dioceses of Cincinnati and Fort Wayne." 
During twelve years of most successful pastoral labor, Father 
Luers won the esteem of his Bishop and the love of his people, 
and it is not surprising, that when the diocese of Fort Wayne 
was established, he should be made its first Bishop. 

Nobody was more surprised than Father Luers himself, 
when he was informed, that the choice had fallen upon him 
for episcopal honors and labors. But with characteristic 
humility and simplicity he bowed his head, exclaiming: "Be- 
hold, Thy servant, O Lord!" He was consecrated a Bishop 
in the same cathedral, in which he had been ordained priest, 
on January 10, 1858. Archbishop Purcell was the consecrating 
prelate, and the Right Rev. Maurice de St. Palais, Bishop of 
Vincennes, and the Right Rev. George Aloysius Carroll, Bishop 
of Covington, were the assisting prelates; Very Rev. E. T. 
ColHns, V. G., was archdeacon, and the Revs. J. C. Albrinck, 
of Pomeroy, and C. H. Borgess, of Columbus, afterwards Bishop 
of Detroit, were the deacon and subdeacon of the Pontifical 
Mass. The Right Rev. Martin J. Spalding, Bishop of Bards- 
town, preached the sermon. In the afternoon of the day of 



Bishop John Henry Luers, Continued. 33 

his consecration, Bishop Luers wa? invited to visit St. Joseph's 
Church, of which he had been the efficient pastor. We quote 
again from the CathoHc Telegraph: "The sanctuary was 
briUiantly illumined, the church thronged to overflowing. A 
frame work erected in the sanctuary bore, in the midst of 
light, appropriate texts of Scripture; the choir commenced 
the proceedings with a hymn. The Rev. Stehle, aided by the 
Rev. Somers, who were afterwards charged with the care of the 
congregation, arranged rich offerings appertaining to the 
episcopal chapel and office, on a credence table, and an address 
was read to the new Bishop. The little boys and girls of the 
school, handsomely dressed, the girls in white and wearing 
bright crowns, the young unmarried men and ladies, the fathers 
and mothers of families, the officers of religious societies, and 
all the German Catholics of Cincinnati, through their able 
representative Father Otto, had a word and a gift for their 
Right Reverend friend, the delivery of which was interspersed 
with music from the choir. It was a heart-offering from all 
present to the merit and virtues of the faithful pastor now 
leaving them. The Archbishop and the Bishops of Vincennes 
and Covington, who were in the sanctuary, were deeply affected 
by this exhibition of an entire people's gratitude and faith." 
Another witness of these impressive scenes has written: "It 
was a touching sight to see St. Joseph's congregation on last 
Sunday afternoon, when the Bishop of Fort Wayne came to 
say farewell. Not a dry eye could be seen in the crowded 
edifice, and sobs were frequently heard breaking the solemn 
stillness of the church. After the exercises were over in the 
church, the newly consecrated prelate visited the schools, and 
here, to see and hear the tokens of sorrow every where visible, 
became perfectly painful ; and it was only after repeated assur- 
ances, that he would often visit them, could their grief be 
restrained. Kneeling to receive his blessing, with a thousand 
wishes for his welfare, the impressive scene closed." 

Anxious to enter upon the work, assigned to him by the 
Holy See in the new diocese of Fort Wayne, he set out for the 
town of Fort Wayne in a day or two after his consecration. 
"He arrived towards evening, alone and unannounced, carrying 
his traveling bag in his hand, at the door of the residence of 
Very Rev. Father Benoit." What John A. Wilstach, Esquire, 



34 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

wrote in his sketch of St. Mary's Church, of Lafayette, in the 
year 1893, will certainly prove of interest to our readers: 'it 
would seem that one of the first cares of Bishop Luers, in his 
new diocese, was to select his episcopal city. This had received 
a designation in his commission from the Vatican, because 
Archbishop Purcell, in the multifariousness of his duties, had 
suggested Fort Wayne, but an application to Rome by Bishop 
Luers would have immediately produced the change in the 
designation. Now it so happened, that from his first visit to 
the Star City of the West, Bishop Luers had desired to write 
after his name. Bishop of Lafayette. Here he found our 
beautiful situation, our shining river with its amphitheatre of 
crowning heights on either side. Here he found a body of 
educated Catholics willing to make, under his leadership, any 
sacrifice in his behalf, and here also, he found handsome and 
beautiful church and school improvements greatly superior to 
those existing in Fort Wayne. He selected, with an eye 
which taste and prophecy both guided, the plat of land now 
occupied by the Lafayette Public Library, and the buildings 
to the south of it and the Opera House to the east, as the seat 
of the Cathedral, an episcopal residence, school, convent and 
hospital. This unsurpassable tract of land, almost in the 
center of the city, was to be obtained, partly by purchase and 
partly by gift. The gift was to be from the city, and the project 
was voted down in the city council by one vote, and that the 
vote of the member from the first ward. History and tradition 
have consigned, or should consign, his name to oblivion, and 
there let it rest." 

Bishop Luers found his Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, to be a 
small frame church in a delapidated condition, and the episcopal 
residence was a brick structure, erected by Rev. A. Bessonies, 
who had charge of the parish during the absence of Father 
Benoit in Louisiana. He also found, that his diocese comprised 
forty-two counties extending north from the northern boun- 
daries of Fountain, Montgomery, Boone, Hamilton, Madison, 
Delaware, Randolph and Warren counties, a distance of 120 
miles, and from the Ohio State Line to the Illinois State Line, 
a distance of 170 miles. Having appointed Father Benoit his 
Vicar General, he set out to visit his diocese, and it can be said 
truthfully, that he was hardly ever to be found at home, in 



1483492 

Bishop John Henry Luers, Continued. 35 

Fort Wayne. He manifested great affection for his priests, 
encouraging them in their arduous labors, and sharing these 
labors with them whenever and wherever he could. He 
travelled the length and breadth of his diocese, over and over 
again, anxious to be where he might be of service. In all his 
travels, however, which were both night and day, he always 
managed to have the opportunity for celebrating Mass. He 
used to say: "God derives more glory from the celebration of 
one Mass, than from all the praises of the angels in heaven. 
Ought not priests to give God that glory no matter at what 
personal inconvenience ?" It is related of him, that, when 
knocking at a priest's house for admission at a rather early 
hour, the window was thrown up, and a voice was heard to 

say: "Be off to out of that! Don't you know, that his 

reverence is sick, and can't go on sick calls? A pretty time of 
the day you are calling." The window closed amid a shower 
of abuse on the unknown Bishop. He quietly walked, valise 
in hand, to the convent, where he met with a cordial reception. 

He said: "There was a man down at Father 's house who 

ordered me to rather warm quarters, but I thought it better 
to come and say Mass." Another quotation from Mr. Wil- 
stach's production will give us an insight into the Bishop's 
character and work: "He spared himself no labors official or 
menial, religious or domestic, of the house or of the field, of 
the city or of the country. Well is it remembered by those, 
who were present on one autumn Sunday in St. Mary's church, 
at Lafayette, how his face and his hands were so bronzed by 
the labor of the field's harvest work at the orphan farm near 
Rensselaer, that he hardly passed for white. His hands hung 
down black over the front of the pulpit (a favorite attitude 
with him), and his face rose above the purple cape as black as 
his hands." From all of which we conclude, that Bishop 
Luers was, in very truth, a pioneer bishop preparing the way 
for the elegance and comforts of the bishops of later generations. 
During his administration biennial retreats of the clergy 
were held at the University of Notre Dame, an accommodation 
which has ever since been a great advantage to the diocesan 
clergy. At the conclusion of these spiritual exercises, synods 
were held to regulate the affairs of the diocese, both as to 
temporalities and spiritualities. Among other things, the 



36 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Bishop checked effectually the pernicious system of over- 
zealous lay trusteeism. 

Bishop Luers was distinguished for his devotion to the 
Holy See. He had a great desire to visit the Eternal City, 
and to manifest his loyalty to the Vicar of Christ on earth, in 
the person of Pius IX. Accordingly he started upon his pil- 
grimage to Rome, on May 29, 1864, accompanied by the Rev. 
A. B. Oechtering, leaving the administration of the diocese in 
the hands of his Vicar General, Father Benoit. On his way he 
visited Louvain, where he secured four young levites for his 
diocese. At Rome he was received with great kindness by 
the Holy Father, and was entrusted with the drawing up of 
the constitution and rules for the Sisters of the Holy Cross, 
in America, with a view to having them approved ultimately 
by the Holy See. Upon his return, he continued his arduous 
labors for the advancement of every great interest of his diocese. 
It was he, who adopted a plan for the support of aged and 
infirm priests, under the title of the Catholic Clerical Benevolent 
Association of the Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

On many an occasion did the earnest Bishop become the 
public champion and defender of the faith. In their contro- 
versies with him, tricky controversialists met with a great 
surprise and an overwhelming and silencing defeat. Having 
been attacked in the public press because of his attitude in 
the defence of Catholic Education, he replied in a card, from 
which we make this extract : " It is with me a matter of sincere 
regret, that our non-Catholic friends will not understand the 
Catholic position upon the so-called public school question. 
We do not object to Protestants sending their children to the 
public schools, nor to their supporting them by a tax, or in 
any other way they may deem fit. We have not the slightest 
intention of interfering with their existence. They may, per- 
haps, think they are well adapted to the wants of those who 
patronize them, but Catholic parents, who realize the sacred 
obligations of preparing their children, not only for this life 
but for the life to come, prefer to see their children in schools 
where religious instruction and moral discipline go hand in 
hand with secular education. Many Catholics regard it a 
hardship, that they should be taxed to support a school system 
that they do not and cannot approve; but in Indiana it is the 



Bishop John Henry Luers, Concluded. 37 

creature of the State Constitution, and until that instrument 
is changed or amended in this particular, Catholics, as law 
abiding citizens, must continue to bear their share of the 
burden, as well as assume their share of the responsibility." 

Bishop Luers attended the Second Plenary Council of 
Baltimore, which assembled on the first Sunday of October, 
1866; but he was not present at the Oecumenical Council of the 
Vatican, convened by Pius IX, having been excused, partly 
on account of the needs of his own diocese and partly that he 
might serve neighboring dioceses, in the absence of their bishops. 
During this time he travelled much, and there is little doubt 
but that he administered confirmation in every county of three 
States, and also conferred holy orders in the seminaries. It 
was not, however, without regret, that he was obliged to absent 
himself from the \'atican Council, being most anxious to give 
his homage to the Vicar of Christ, and to record his approval 
of the Definition of the Dogma of Papal Infallibility. 

The end of his life is another evidence of the uncertainty 
of the hour and place and circumstances, when death may call 
upon us. On June 29, 1871, he gave Minor Orders to three 
seminarians and conferred Deaconship on another, in Cleveland. 
After breakfast, preferring to walk rather than to ride, on his 
way to the railway station he intended to make a call at the 
episcopal residence, when, on the corner of Bond and St. Clair 
streets he fell, having suffered a stroke of apoplexy. Having 
been carried to the Bishop's house, he received absolution, 
Extreme Unction and the last Indulgence, and within fifteen 
or twenty minutes he expired. Clergymen and laymen from 
both dioceses, escorted the remains from Cleveland to Fort 
Wayne; even a delegation from the deceased Bishop's old 
parish, St. Joseph's, at Cincinnati, was present to pay its tribute 
of love and gratitude. The funeral took place in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on July 4th, and was attended by Archbishop 
Purcell and the Bishops de St. Palais, O'Hara, Toebbe, .Mc- 
Closkey and Borgess. Archbishop Purcell preached the 
sermon, from which we quote a single sentence: "Bishop 
Luers presided over the diocese of Fort Wayne with marked 
zeal and abiHty." The remains of the first Bishop of Fort 
Wayne rest in the Crvpt beneath the sanctuary of the Cathedral. 



CHAPTER IV. 

THE RIGHT REV. JOSEPH DWENGER, C. PP. S., D. D. 
THE SECOND BISHOP OF FORT WAYNE. 

H. Dwenger and his wife, the parents of Bishop Dwenger, 
emigrated from Aukum, Hanover, in the diocese of Osna- 
brueck, to the United States in the spring of 1837. They 
bought fotty acres of land in Mercer county, Ohio, near the 
present town of St. John. Having cleared a spot of the huge 
oak trees, they built a log hut, which became their home. In 
this humble abode, Joseph, the future Bishop of Fort Wayne, 
saw the light of day, on September 7, 1837. When in after 
years the Bishop referred to his birth place, he would say: "I 
was born between four big oak stumps, in a dense forest of 
Mercer county, Ohio." There were indeed four and more oak 
stumps around the log cabin of his birth. On the morning 
after Joseph's birth, the father hailed a neighbor passing his 
dwelling, saying to him: "Last night God sent us a little 
bishop!" The memory of this strange remark after seventy 
years, still lives with older members of St. John's parish, in 
Mercer county. What could have induced the father to speak 
thus to his neighbor? Was it a prophecy! 

Joseph was about three years old, when Providence visited 
the happy family with a severe affliction. The father, whose 
strong arm protected and supported the mother, Joseph and 
his two older brothers, was removed from their midst at the 
call of death. The sorrow-stricken widow was left in destitute 
and helpless condition. In the hope of finding support for 
herself and children she went to Cincinnati, and became a 
member of Holy Trinity parish. When of age Joseph attended 
the parochial school of Holy Trinity, where, owing to his talents 
and industry, he made rapid progress in the elementary branches 
of education. 

In the early summer of 1849, we find the widow and her 
son Joseph again occupying the log cabin in Mercer county. 
Why she should leave a comfortable home and her two older 
sons in Cincinnati and with Joseph alone return to the woods 



Bishop Joseph Dwenger, Continued. 39 

in Mercer county, is an incident in Joseph's life full of signifi- 
cance, inspired by heaven; as the sequel shows. The cholera 
of 1849 spared the mother and her son; but in October of the 
same year both were prostrated on a bed of sickness, and, in 
the case of the widow, of death also. Rev. Andrew Kunkler, 
C. PP. S., the pastor of St. John's was called, and he found her 
at death's door. He administered to her all the helps of 
religion, and every comfort human consolation can give. But, 
the poor mother was much troubled. She pointed to the little 
cot, on which lay her son Joseph sick and unconscious, saying: 
"I am willing to die, but what will become of my dear Joseph, 
wheni am no more?" Father Kunkler, ever ready to console 
and assist the afflicted and needy, promised he would take 
upon himself the care of the boy. Such are the ways of Provi- 
dence. Contented and with a smile on her countenance, the 
widow Dwenger departed this life, on October 25, 1849. Joseph, 
now an orphan, was not homeless, for Father Kunkler carried 
him on his arms into the priest's house and cared for him. The 
boy soon recovered and waxed healthy and strong. 

Joseph knew well the desire of his mother, often expressed, 
to have him become a priest, and could easily perceive that his 
protector Father Kunkler, would have him become one of the 
Fathers of the Precious Blood. He considered seriously and 
prayed earnestly. At last, in 1 854, after five years of probation, 
he became a member of the Congregation of the Most Precious 
Blood. Shortly after the Provincial, Very Rev. Francis Sales 
Brunner, sent him to Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, 
for the study of philosophy and theology; of which Revs. 
Rosecranz, Quinlan and Barry were the professors. At the 
seminary Joseph was known as the "Western Ohio student." 
He made rapid progress in his studies, and being punctual in 
all matters of discipline, endeared himself to his professors and 
his superiors, as well as Archbishop Purcell. He received 
tonsure and minor orders on December 19, 1857. On August 
20, 1859, he was ordained subdeacon and on the day following 
deacon. Priesthood was conferred on him by Archbishop 
Purcell, on September 4, 1859. Father Dwenger celebrated 
his first Mass on September 8, 1859, in St. John's Church, not 
far from the place where he was born. 

The Seminary of the Congregation of the Most Precious 



40 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Blood, which had been transferred from the diocese of Cleveland 
to that of Cincinnati, in 1859, was located at Himmelgarten 
Convent, near St. Henry, Mercer county, Ohio. Father 
Dwenger was appointed its rector and also filled the office of a 
professor. This location however of the seminary was neither 
convenient nor satisfactory. Father Dwenger was empowered 
by the Society PP. S. to purchase at Carthagena the so-called 
"Emlen Institution," which for a time had been a manual 
labor school for colored children, but had been abandoned and 
was then the property of a John Smith.- With the assistance 
of Christopher Schunk, Father Dwenger effected the purchase 
in March, 1861. Mr. Smith was under the impression that he 
was seUing the property to a Protestant minister. In May, 
1861, the building just purchased was remodeled and repaired 
and the seminary installed here, with Father Dwenger as its 
rector and professor. Father Dwenger was physically an 
imposing figure full of vitality and health. He devoted himself 
to the discharge of his duties with his whole soul, and great 
and not unfounded were the hopes entertained with regard to 
him. He was of an impulsive nature and at times would appear 
too harsh but "after a little harmless explosion of his patience, 
the next moment all was serene again; he would never harbor 
any grudge in his heart." In the seminary he was a strict 
disciplinarian and he would not tolerate a lazy and careless 
student; whilst the diligent student always found in him a 
kind father and teacher. He filled the position of rector and 
professor at the seminary during three years. 

In 1864, he was appointed pastor at Wapakoneta and of 
St. Mary's, Auglaize county, Ohio, having charge at the same 
time of the parish at Glynnwood. He began the erection of a 
new church in St. Mary's, in 1866. The parish was small in 
number and poor; but owing to his intense activity he collected 
funds near and far, so much so that when the new church was 
dedicated on November 19, 1867, $12,000 had been collected 
and the structure was free from every indebtedness. Having 
been most successful as the rector and a professor of the sem- 
inary and also as a pastor and a church builder. Father Dwenger 
was now assigned to the work of giving missions. He was 
engaged in this work from 1868 to 1872, giving missions in 
Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and in other States. Sometimes he 



Bishop Joseph Dwenger, Continued. 41 

was accompanied by one priest or' other of the Community, 
but generally he did the work unassisted. He was successful 
in his work owing to his great earnestness and popular style 
of preaching. 

Father Dwenger was befriended by Archbishop Purcell, 
who chose him as his theologian and secretary at the Council 
of Baltimore, in 1866. The Archbishop frequently had him 
as a companion on confirmation trips through Mercer and 
Auglaize counties. On one occasion, while at dinner, one of 
the Fathers present asked His Grace, whether he could not 
delegate Rev. Joseph Dwenger to drive out and administer 
confirmation. The Archbishop answered: "Of course I might, 
but I am afraid he would impart too severe a blow." Father 
Dwenger attended the Second Council of Baltimore repre- 
senting Very Rev. Andrew Kunkler, the Provincial of the 
C. PP. S. It can be said truthfully that he was a ruling spirit 
in all the transactions of the Congregation, to which he belonged. 
The Provincial had the utmost confidence in his prudence and 
business tact ; so much so that he had Father Dwenger to preside 
over nearly all the meetings. On the other hand. Father 
Dwenger was most devoted and attached to his benefactor 
and was ever ready to do all in his power for the benefit of the 
Community. It may be mentioned here that when Father 
Joseph was deliberating whether to accept or decline the mitre 
he wrote Father Kunkler a most affectionate letter asking him 
for direction. He concluded the letter with these words: "I 
shall always remain your Joseph." 

The See of Fort Wayne having been made vacant by the 
death of Bishop Luers, Pope Pius IX appointed Father Dwenger 
Bishop of Fort Wayne. He was consecrated in the Cathedral 
of Cincinnati by Archbishop Purcell, assisted by Bishops Toebbe 
and Borgess, on April 14, 1872. Without any delay the new 
Bishop repaired to the future scene of his labors, and began 
by investigating the condition of his diocese. He found the 
diocese somewhat involved financially, but as we have seen he 
was not a novice in finances, and in the course of time wiped 
out the existing indebtedness. On April 28, 1874, Bishop 
Dwenger addressed a circular to his clergy, from which we 
quote the first sentence: "Conscious of the awful responsi 
bilities of my Holy Office, and my own weakness and imper- 



L 



42 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

fections, I leave Fort Wayne the 10th of May next, to make a 
pilgrimage to Lourdes, and to the shrines of the Apostles, 
hoping thereby to obtain some special graces from God for 
the salvation of my poor soul; to obtain for myself and my 
diocese the blessing of our venerable and saintly Pontiff, Pius 
IX, and to obtain other benefits for my diocese." This was 
the first American pilgrimage to Rome and Lourdes. Should 
any of our readers enjoy the happy privilege of visiting the 
Grotto of Lourdes, let them, on entering the magnificent basilica 
look to the left, and among the many votive offerings with 
which the wall is covered, they will perceive a beautiful 
American flag with its red, white and blue and with its stars 
and stripes, left there by Bishop Dwenger, leader of the pious 
band of pilgrims, venerating Mary Immaculate at her holy 
shrine. 

What will, among other acts of his, keep the memory of 
Bishop Dwenger in benediction, is his care of the orphans. 
The asylum near Rensselaer, for both the boys and the girls, 
had become inadequate, and the location undesirable. In 
1875, Bishop Dwenger purchased fifty acres of land near 
Lafayette, on which he erected a four story brick building at a 
cost of about |30,000. This new institution known as the 
St. Joseph's Asylum and Manual Labor School, is devoted to 
the care of the orphan boys. 

His pastoral and missionary work had convinced Bishop 
Dwenger of the importance and necessity of a parochial school 
in every parish. Hence he insisted not only that pastors must 
provide these schools, but he also established a Diocesan School 
Board, in 1879, consisting of ten priests, to whom he entrusted 
the supervision of the parochial schools of the diocese. The 
members of this Board were obliged to visit and examine all 
the parochial schools in their respective district, at least once 
a year, and to report to the Bishop concerning the condition 
of these schools. The same system has been adopted in many 
dioceses of the country. 

In 1883, Bishop Dwenger on his way to Rome to make his 
official visit ad limina, again visited Lourdes. At Rome he 
received deserved recognition, for his labors in the distant 
American diocese. Surrounded by his clergy and laity and 
with heartfelt wishes for an administration "ad multos annos," 



Bishop Joseph Dwenger, Continued. 43 

Bishop Dwenger celebrated his S.acerdotal Silver Jubilee in 1884. 
In November and December of the same year the Bishop 
attended the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, where, 
among the thirteen Archbishops and seventy Bishops he was 
the nineteenth in rank^and seniority. In March, 1885, he again 
visited Rome, this time in the interests of the Council and as 
the representative of the American Hierarchy. While in Rome 
he was the guest of the American College, where he spent seven 
months. During this time the decrees of the Council of Balti- 
more were presented by him to the Propaganda, and were 
approved. He was in Rome on the 4th of July, which the 
American students were anxious to celebrate. However it 
was thought inadvisable to display the American flag in such 
close proximity to the Quirinal. At this juncture Bishop 
Dwenger stept forward, and commanded in a way that could 
not be misunderstood: "Boys, hoist the American flag!" 
Instantly the Stars and Stripes were floated on high, and the 
American students sang: "Hail Columbia." When the Italian 
government intended to confiscate the American College in 
Rome, Bishop Dwenger hastened to Washington protesting in 
his own name and in the name of the American Hierarchy 
that the College was American property. At the instance of 
Secretary Blaine the Italian government gave assurance that 
the College would not be confiscated. 

In 1886 the Bishop gave another evidence of his love for 
the orphans by erecting, on the twenty-five acre lot within the 
limits of the city of Fort Wayne, a magnificent structure to 
serve as an asylum for the orphan girls. The Bishop made his 
fourth and last visit to Rome in 1888, more for the sake of his 
health, than to transact any important business. Anxious to 
do still more for Catholic education the Bishop induced the 
Fathers C. PP. S. to establish what is now known as St. Joseph's 
College near Rensselaer. The College was opened in September, 
1891, but Bishop Dwenger, whose health was declining, was 
unable to assist at its dedication. The Community of the 
Precious Blood has redeemed the land where the College now 
stands, and which was a great swamp, by spending on its 
improvement and on the construction of the buildings a sum 
of over |100,000. 

While enjoying good health Bishop Dwenger was truly a 



44 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

good shepherd of his diocese. He frequently visited all the 
parishes for confirmation and other episcopal functions. When 
however his health failed him more and more and became 
enfeebled by constant exertion he succumbed to a severe attack 
of heart trouble. His last effort to improve his health was a 
visit to New Mexico, which visit had little or no effect. Re- 
turning he resigned himself to what was evidently God's will 
and prepared for the end, which came after a lingering illness of 
nearly three years, on January 23, 1893. The funeral obsequies 
took place on January 26th. The Pontifical Requiem Mass 
was celebrated by Archbishop Elder. The prelates present in 
the sanctuary were: Archbishop Katzer of Milwaukee, Bishop 
Foley of Detroit, Bishop Horstmann of Cleveland, Bishop 
Janssen of Belleville, Bishop Maes of Covington, Bishop Rade- 
macher of Nashville, Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids and 
Bishop Vertin of Marquette. Besides these dignitaries over 
two hundred priests attended. Members of the C. PP. S., to 
which the deceased Bishop belonged, present were: The Very 
Rev. H. Drees, Provincial; Rev. F. Nigsch, Procurator; Revs. 
Dickmann and Seifert, Consultors, and sixteen other Fathers. 
Bishop Rademacher delivered the funeral oration, selecting 
for his text I Macabees, Ch. V, 19-21: "How is the mighty 
man fallen that saved Israel." The preacher dwelling on the 
character of the deceased Bishop said: "Bishop Dwenger as 
all who have had the pleasure of knowing him will admit, was 
cast by nature in what we may call a grand heroic mould. 
Physically he was at least in the prime of his vigorous life — a 
perfect specimen of manhood. His powers of endurance and 
his capacity for hard work were simply marvelous. Even when 
by the labors of his long ministry, his powers began to wane, 
the long sickness which he endured also attested the wonderful 
strength and vitality of his constitution. In that vigorous body 
there dwelt a soul, equally vigorous and highly gifted; and we 
may truly say that his strong constitution, and especially his 
strong and expressive countenance, were a faithful index to 
the strong soul that dwelt within and ruled that body. His 
mind was clear and logical, and he was eminently practical. 
His memory was prodigious — both faithful and retentive. His 
will was strong and unbending, when he believed himself in 
the right, and especially when he defended what he considered 



Bishop Joseph Dwenger, Concluded. 45 

right and just. As for his heart, -it was true as steel, and 
noble, world-wide and generous in its sympathies, as Holy 
Church itself. As for his love of the country it is strange that 
it should ever have been called in question. As he said him- 
self, he was born under an oak tree, that is to say, in poverty; 
but the roots of that oak tree were not struck deeper and more 
firmly into the soil than the love of his country had struck its 
roots in the heart of the great Bishop. As for his love of the 
Church, it amounted simply to loyalty and chivalry. He was 
indeed in every sense a most devoted son of the Church, and 
he was a most true and model son of his country." 

All that is mortal of Bishop Dwenger rests in the Crypt 
of the Cathedral, between Bishop Luers and Bishop Rade- 
macher. 



CHAPTER V. 

THE RIGHT REV. JOSEPH RADEMACHER, D. D. 
THE THIRD BISHOP OF FORT WAYNE. 

The Right Rev. Joseph Rademacher, the third Bishop of 
Fort Wayne, was born in Westphaha, Qinton county, Michigan, 
on December 3, 1840. His parents sent him to the Benedictine 
College, near Latrobe, Pennsylvania, in 1855. Here he made 
his classical and philosophical studies and also began the study 
of theology, which latter however he completed in St. Michael's 
Seminary, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Bishop Luers accepted 
him for the diocese of Fort Wayne, and ordained him a priest 
on August 2, 1863. 

His first field of labor was Attica and its vicinity, of which 
place he was made the first resident pastor. He also attended 
Covington and the entire country East and West, from Odell 
to the Illinois State Line. He found the church and house 
devoid of every convenience. The pews in the church were 
rough boards and store boxes; but he provided an altar, new 
pews and a little reed organ. The year 1865 became a memor- 
able year, for in it, for the first time, a first communion class 
was admitted in the month of May, and at the same time 
Bishop Luers administered confirmation. It is well known, 
that the congregation was small and poor, and that Father 
Rademacher had to submit to many privations and hardships, 
but he never uttered a word of complaint. In 1870, he was 
transferred to Columbia City. When, in 1872, the pastorate 
of St. Mary's church, at Fort Wayne, became vacant, he was 
appointed to succeed Rev. J. Weutz. He had for his assistant 
the Rev. Charles Steurer. Having done faithful service here 
for seven years, he was transferred to St. Mary's Church at 
Lafayette, in 1880, of which he remained the pastor till June 
24, 1883. He was noted lor zeal and prudence, and endearing 
himself to all, by his gentle and fatherly disposition, he was 
familiarly known as Father Joseph. "Besides being remark- 
able for his intellectual, social and religious qualities, Father 
Rademacher was remarkable also for his devotion to literature, 



Bishop Joseph Rademacher, Continued. 47 

not only theological but general. He joined to his knowledge 
of men and of aflFairs a close knowledge of books, and a memory 
which retained every thing which his mind acquired. A proof 
of this was furnished the writer one day in a singular manner. 
The writer had closely examined, only a few hours before, the 
early history of France. Entering into discourse with Father 
Rademacher, the conversation turned on this early history, 
and especially the significance of the battle of Soissonnes, as 
one of the decisive battles of Europe. As to this significance, 
the writer was giving his ideas. That was in the year 486, 
interposed the pastor. Continued the interlocutor, yes, the 
king of the Franks had no ordinary antagonist. Syagrius, the 
Roman governor, again interposed the pastor. His interlocutor 
paused for a moment in wonder, and then put the question: 
Tell me, pray. Father Rademacher, how did you happen to 
know so exactly this date and this name? Ah! he responded, 
I have read the history of those times." 

The See of Nashville, Tennessee, having become vacant 
upon the translation of Bishop Feehan to Chicago, in April, 
1883, Father Rademacher was appointed his successor, and 
was consecrated Bishop of Nashville on June 24th of that same 
year. His Vicar General and intimate friend, Rev. P. J. 
Gleeson, in reply to an inquiry, writes: "It gives me pleasure 
to do anything to honor the memory of Bishop Rademacher. 
When he took charge the diocese of Nashville wa^ still suffering 
from the effects of the yellow-fever in Memphis, where so many 
priests and religious had fallen victims to that dreaded scourge. 
His humble, hard-working zeal in meeting the peculiar con- 
ditions that confronted him, his readiness to do missionary 
work, and help even the humblest in preaching, hearing con- 
fessions, attending sick-calls, even taking the place of his 
priests who might be absent on a much needed rest, soon won 
for the Bishop the affection and the esteem of priests and 
people. This bond of affection between Bishop Rademacher 
and the priests and people of his diocese grew and deepened 
with the years, as his amiable, modest character became known: 
so that one and all instinctively called him GOOD Bishop 
Rademacher. The peculiar circumstances following the yellow 
fever, coupled with the financial conditions then prevailing 
throughout the country, did not allow his zeal to find expression 



48 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

in the erection of church buildings. But his holy life, good 
example, his kindness to priests laboring in small and scattered 
missions, his patience and forbearance with all who came in 
contact with him, have built up a spiritual edifice in which 
the name of GOOD Bishop Rademacher is enshrined, and 
which will last as long as the generation that knew him lives. 
All honor to his memory." 

On January 22, 1893, Bishop Dwenger was called to his 
reward. To the great joy of the clergy and laity of the diocese. 
Pope Leo XIII, by letters dated July 14, 1893, transferred 
Bishop Rademacher from Nashville to Fort Wayne. Having 
endeared himself to all, during his former residence among 
them, the entire population turned out to give him welcome, 
when on October 3, 1893, his solemn installation in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne took place. Father Brammer, Administrator 
of the diocese, addressing the Bishop at the entrance to the 
Cathedral said, among other things: "Ever since the death 
of Bishop Dwenger, it has been the earnest wish of every 
Catholic in this diocese, that you would be made its Bishop. 
For this reason, and because we love and respect you, our 
welcome is all the heartier." A most impressive reception 
took place on the evening of October 4th, but on the day 
following, the solemn installation and Pontifical Mass was 
celebrated at 9:30, with Bishop Rademacher as Celebrant, 
Very Rev. Joseph Brammer assistant priest, Revs. E. P. Walter 
and E. Koenig deacons of honor. Rev. John R. Quinlan deacon 
and Rev. C. B. Guendhng subdeacon of the Mass, Rev. W. J. 
Quinlan, master of ceremonies, and Very Rev. William Corby, 

C. S. C, Rev. A. B. Oechtering, chaplains to Archbishop Elder. 
The Bulls of Pope Leo XI II were read by Rev. J. H. Hueser, 

D. D., after which the Archbishop escorted the Bishop to the 
throne. After this, each priest of the diocese in turn knelt 
before the Bishop, in token of submission kissing the Bishop's 
ring. The sermon on this occasion was preached by Bishop 
Foley of Detroit, whose text was: "You have not chosen 
me, but I you. Go forth, therefore, into the world, teaching 
all men in my name, for lo, I am with you even unto the con- 
summation of the world." The prelates honoring the occasion 
with their presence were: Archbishop Katzer of Milwaukee, 
Archbishop Elder of Cincinnati, Bishop Maes of Covington, 



Bishop Joseph Rademacher, Continued. 49 

Bishop Watterson of Columbus,* Bishop Foley of Detroit, 
Bishop Horstmann of Cleveland, Bishop McCloskey of Louis- 
ville, Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids, Bishop Janssen of 
Belleville, Mgr. Thorpe V. G. of Cleveland, Mgr. Joos V. G. of 
Detroit and Mgr. Windthorst of Chillicothe, Ohio, the Vicars 
General Scheidler of Indianapolis and Albrinck of Cincinnati, 
Rev. G. F. Houck Chancellor of Cleveland, the Provincials 
Englert, O. F. M., Corby, C. S. C, Drees, C. PP. S. and Very 
Rev. Patrick Gleeson, Administrator of the diocese of Nashville. 
After the ceremonies, the clergy attended a banquet served in 
Library Hall. 

For five years, unitl the close of 1898, the diocese of Fort 
Wayne continued to flourish, under the gentle yet efficient 
administration of Bishop Rademacher. Most conscientious in 
the discharge of duty, and realizing fully the great responsibility 
resting upon him, he did not lose sight of a single important 
interest of the diocese. The happiness of his priests, and the 
welfare of the parishes, were uppermost in his mind and heart. 
It is noteworthy, that often times he had to undergo a severe 
struggle, when his gentle disposition on the one hand and 
imperative duty on the other, coming in conflict, demanded 
a decision. It was then, that Bishop Rademacher experienced 
more suffering and greater concern, than those immediately 
concerned. 

Churches multiplied, church properties improved, schools 
increased in number, and the work of education progressed 
most satisfactorily. He never failed to be present where his 
presence was required, and everywhere, all over the diocese, 
his influence for good was felt. It is to be regretted, that a 
beneficent administration like his was cut short, when human 
expectations were highest. 1 1 is needless, and altogether painful 
to record the circumstances under which the poor Bishop spent 
the last year of his life. The daily press at the time had this 
to say substantially on January 18, 1900: The Bishop's illness 
dates back something over a year. On returning from a visit 
at South Bend, the Bishop appeared worn and ill, and in a 
short time it became apparent, that he was bordering on a 
state of mental collapse. The physical break down followed, 
and within a few months, the once robust frame of the Bishop 
was but a sad reminder of the past. The patient was removed 



50 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

to St. Joseph's Hospital, at Fort Wayne, where he remained 
for several months; after which he was taken to Chicago, and 
placed under the care of a specialist, for four months, at St. 
Elizabeth's hospital. When it was found that he was incurable, 
he was removed to Fort Wayne. It was on January 12th, at 
11:25 A. M., when Bishop Rademacher yielded up his spirit to 
his Creator. The news of his death was received with universal 
sadness, for the good Bishop had been well beloved by his 
people and esteemed and respected by all. The solemn funeral 
services took place on January 16th, and were participated in, 
by not only the clergy of the diocese, but also by the clergy 
from other parts, swelling the number of priests in attendance 
to fully three hundred. The church dignitaries, who by their 
presence gave testimony of their esteem for the deceased 
Bishop were: Archbishop Elder of Cincinnati, Archbishop 
Katzer of Milwaukee, Bishop Byrne of Nashville, Bishop 
Chatard of Indianapolis, Bishop Foley of Detroit, Bishop 
Horstmann of Cleveland, Bishop Janssen of Belleville, Bishop 
Maes of Covington, Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids, Bishop 
Scannell of Omaha, Archabbot Leander Schnerr, O. S. B., 
Abbot Edmund Obrecht, O. C. R., Abbot Athanasius Schmidt, 
O. S. B., Very Rev. M. J. Marseile, C. S. V., Very Rev. John B. 
Murray, President Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Very Rev. Joseph 
Rainer, President St. Francis' Seminary, Very Rev. F. J. Baum- 
gartner, V. G., Very Rev. D. O'Donaghue, V. G. After the 
recitation of the Office for the dead, by the assembled clergy 
at nine o'clock, the Pontifical Mass of Requiem was celebrated 
vv'ith Archbishop Elder as celebrant, Very Rev, John H. Guend- 
ling as Assistant Priest, Rev. John Bleckmann Deacon, Rev. 
John H, Bathe Subdeacon of the Mass, Rev. A. J. Morrissey 
and Rev. J. F. Delaney Deacons of Honor, Rev, W. J. Quinlan, 
Rev. C. B. Guendling and Rev. John Durham Masters of 
Ceremonies, Rev. P. J. O'Reilley and Rev. F. X. Labonte 
Acolytes, Rev. John F. Noll Book-bearer, Rev. P. J. Crawley 
Candle-bearer, Rev. A. E. Lafontaine Mitre-bearer, Rev. T. 
Mungovan Censer-bearer and Rev. J. C. Keller the Gremiale. 
The sermon was preached by Bishop Horstmann of Cleveland, 
an intimate friend of the deceased. His text was: "My soul 
doth magnify the Lord and my spirit doth rejoice in God, my 
Saviour. He that is mighty hath done great things in me and 



Bishop Joseph Rademacher, Continued. 51 

holy is His name. And His mercy is from generation to gener- 
ation to them that fear Him. He hath received Israel His 
servant, being mindful of His mercy." — Luke I. The sermon 
was a thoughtful tribute to the memory of the dead Bishop, 
and an earnest request for the prayers of the faithful, especially 
of those who had been benefited by the life and labor of the 
third Bishop of the diocese of Fort Wayne. 

After the solemn absolution the remains were enclosed in 
a vault beneath the sanctuary of the Cathedral. 

The following touching tribute is quoted as characteristic: 
"Bishop Rademacher, when a priest, was sent to the little 
parish at Attica after his ordination, and also served the small 
missions Covington and Marshfield near by. The Covington 
church was the result of his personal work among the people, 
and in no less degree of his own sacrifices, for the Catholics 
thereabouts had little to give. The congregation was very 
small, and, much as they loved him for his humility and self 
sacrifice, they could not requite him properly in a money way. 
Whenever he announced that his salary was due, he would add, 
in almost the same breath, that if they needed this money for 
the necessaries of life not to worry about him he would try to 
get along as best he could. When he met with the poor he 
gave his last penny. One day a man came to him and said he 
was a painter, and if he only had a few dollars he could buy 
paint and brushes and thus get a job and escape starvation. 
Father Joseph had only two dollars which he handed the man, 
and, seeing that he was in need of a coat, gave him one of the 
two in his possession. Next day he found out that the man was 
a vagrant by choice and had imposed upon him. But Father 
Joseph was so honest and pure minded, said the witness of this 
scene, that he could not think otherwise of any man. 

"At the time Father Joseph was in Attica, the section 
boss of the Wabash railroad invited the priest to a Christmas 
dinner, and both the host and hostess observed, that their 
guest kept trying to hide his shoes, or they thought he did so. 
Watching him more closely the hostess noticed, that he had 
hardly any shoes at all on his feet. She said to her husband: 
They are only pieces and scraps of shoes tied and sewed to- 
gether. Before the Father's departure his host gave him ten 
dollars, on condition that he should spend it on himself for 



52 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

necessary clothing. They learned later, that he had given 
nearly all of his little store of clothing to a poor family, in 
which there were many children, and he thought their need 
was greater than his. Orphans, by the way, were his particular 
weakness, and long after his elevation to the Bishop's throne, 
he went among them with the simpHcity of a parish priest. 

"He was a man of exquisite courtesy, so studiously careful 
of the feelings of others, that he made it the matter of conscience 
as important as his religious duties. No matter how much 
work he had to do, or how worried he was, he never was ill- 
humored. His people always rejoiced when they met him, or 
he came to their homes, for he was ever cheerful and had a 
wonderful smile for everyone. And he never wanted anyone 
to bother or worry about him. 

"What an epitaph for this prince of the church, whose 
tremendous activities were graced by so much simple 
gentleness." 



CHAPTER VI. 

THE RIGHT REV. HERMAN JOSEPH ALERDING, D. D. 
THE FOURTH BISHOP OF FORT WAYNE. 

The present Bishop of Fort Wayne was born in WestphaUa, 
on April 13, 1845. During his infancy, the family emigrated 
to America, and made their home in Newport, Kentucky. He 
attended the parochial schools of Corpus Christi Church. All 
the children of the parish, boys and girls, numbering about one 
hundred and fifty, were taught in one room, by one teacher. 
Scenes such as transpired there are wholly foreign to the present 
time. The education was in every respect strenuous. From 
his earliest boyhood days, he felt an inclination and a desire 
to become a priest. Encouraged by the Rev. John Voll, pastor 
of Corpus Christi Church, he received his first lessons in Latin 
from this zealous priest. He was sent to the diocesan seminary 
in Vincennes, Indiana, from 1858 till 1859. Bishop Carroll 
was unable to accept him, as a student for the diocese of Cov- 
ington, and application having been made to Bishop de St. 
Palais, of Vincennes, he was adopted by that prelate for the 
diocese of Vincennes. The second year of his studies was spent 
in the old St. Thomas' Seminary, near Bardstown, Kentucky. 
In the fall of 1860, he was sent to St. Meinrad's College and 
Seminary in Spencer county, Indiana, which institution was 
conducted by Benedictine Fathers, who had come to this 
country from Einsiedlen, Switzerland. Here he finished his 
studies, and received the Holy Orders from Bishop de St. 
Palais; Tonsure and Minor Orders on September 18, 1865, 
Subdeaconship on June 18, 1867, Deaconship on June 21st of 
the same year, and Priesthood on September 22, 1868. 

His first appointment was that of assistant to the Rev. 
John B. Chasse at St. Joseph's Church, in Terre Haute, where 
he remained until October 18, 1871. While here, he had 
charge also of the missions Rockville and Montezuma, and the 
station Rosedale in Parke county, and of the mission Sullivan 
and the station Farmersburg, in Sullivan county. On October 
18, 1871, he was removed to Cambridge City, where he was the 



54 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

pastor of St. Elisabeth's Church, till August, 1874. Here he 
found a demoralized congregation, which had been interdicted 
for some six months, and was financially involved. After a 
time the debt was paid, but the location of the church was 
most objectionable. The following paper, by Bishop de St. 
Palais, will explain the condition of things, satisfactorily: "in 
consideration of the circumstances, in which the congregation 
of Cambridge City is placed, and of the many sacrifices the 
members of said congregation, though small in number, have 
made to build up their church, and that, notwithstanding all 
their efforts to do so, they now, after years of struggle, find 
the same hemmed in on all sides by the newly constructed 
railroads, in such a manner, that divine service is thereby 
frequently disturbed, and consequently the necessity, of pro- 
curing a more suitable location for the House of God, is appar- 
ent; I, therefore, not only authorize the pastor of said congre- 
gation, the Rev. H. Alerding, to collect funds for this purpose, 
but 1 also herewith strongly recommend the Reverend Gentle- 
man to the generous and charitable sympathies of all, on whom 
he may call for the furtherance of his laudable undertaking. — 
Given at Vincennes under my seal and signature, July 14, 1873. 
— Maurice de St. Palais, Bishop of Vincennes." The generous 
support given Father Alerding enabled him, as already stated, 
to liquidate the indeBtedness on the church property, and also 
to purchase a new site for a new church. While pastor at 
Cambridge City, he had charge also of the stations Knightstown 
and New Castle in Henry county and Hagerstown in Wayne 
county. The churches at Knightstown and New Castle were 
built by him and wholly paid for. It was during his pastorate, 
that Bishop de St. Palais visited all these places, and admin- 
istered Confirmation. 

In 1873, the Rev. Joseph Petit had organized St. Joseph's 
Congregation, at Indianapolis, having erected a two story 
building on East Vermont street, which was to be church, 
school and pastoral residence. Father Petit resigned in 1874. 
Bishop de St. Palais built a roomy three story addition, to the 
structure erected by Father Petit, and made it St. Joseph's 
Seminary. It was at thi^ juncture, in the summer of 1874, 
that Father Alerding was transferred to Indianapolis, and 
appointed to the position of procurator for the Seminary, and 



Bishop Herman Joseph Alerding, Continued. 55 

pastor for the congregation, which continued to have regular 
services in the Seminary chapel. The Seminary continued for 
one year, and was then abandoned. Immediately upon the 
advent of Bishop Chatard to the diocese. Father Alerding was 
directed to build a new church in some other quarter, in order 
that the Bishop might use the old building as a hospital. A 
site was bought on the corner of North and Noble streets for 
$5,500, on which the present St. Joseph's Church was erected 
and was dedicated, on July 4, 1880. The church cost |25,000. 
A priest's house soon followed at the moderate cost of $2,500. 
At the instigation of the pastor, the Sisters of Providence 
erected the St. Joseph's Academy, south of the church. Later, 
a building, 100x50 feet, with four large school rooms on the 
first floor and the entire second floor for a hall, was erected. 
At the close of Father Alerding's pastorate a debt, not at all 
burdensome, remained upon the valuable church property. 

A red letter day in the history of St. Joseph's Church was 
September 22, 1893, when the congregation celebrated the 
Silver Jubilee of its organization, and the pastor the Silver 
Jubilee of his ordination to the priesthood. It was a day of 
joy and still lives in the memory of Father Alerding and his 
friends. 

In 1883, Father Alerding published "A History of the 
Catholic Church in the Diocese of Vincennes." In the preface 
Bishop Chatard says: "It seems to me we all, of this diocese 
of Vincennes, owe a debt of gratitude to Rev. H. Alerding, on 
his successful completion of this history of the beginning of 
the Faith in our midst. It is to be regretted that not all 
corresponded to his request for information, owing, perhaps 
to want of information or documentary statements, or to press 
of occupation. As far as it goes, he has presented us a recital 
having the vividness of actual experience, and the reliability of 
an extract of records. The book is also a monument to his in- 
dustry and untiring patience, in the midst of financial and 
parochial work, which might well have excused him from such 
an undertaking." 

The See of Fort Wayne becoming vacant upon the death 
of Bishop Rademacher, little did Father Alerding or his friends, 
or the diocesans of Fort Wayne dream that he would be the 
Fourth Bishop of the Diocese of Fort Wayne. Yet " BY THE 



56 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

GRACE OF GOD AND THE FAVOR OF THE APOSTOLIC 
SEE" such was the case. The Bulls of appointment bearing 
the date of August 30, 1900, were placed in the hands of the 
Bishop-elect on September 27th, and the consecration took 
place on November 30th, of the same year. The consecration 
took place in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne: Archbishop Elder 
of Cincinnati was the consecrator and Bishop O'Donaghue 
Auxiliary of Indianapolis and Bishop Moeller of Columbus, 
were the Assistant Bishops. Chaplains to Archbishop Elder 
were Revs. J. H. Oechtering, P. F. Roche and E. J. Wrobel. 
Chaplains to Bishop O'Donaghue, Revs. D. J. Mulcahy and 
William Schmidt. Chaplains to Bishop Moeller, Revs. John 
R. Dinnen and H. M. Plaster. Chaplains to the Bishop-elect, 
Revs. A. Morrissey, C. S. C. and John Bleckmann. The other 
prelates present were. Bishop McCloskey, of Louisville; Bishop 
Chatard, of Indianapolis, chaplain Rev. A. J. Kroeger; Bishop 
Richter, of Grand Rapids, chaplain Rev. H. F. Jos. Kroll; 
Bishop Maes, of Covington, chaplain Rev. R. Wurth, O. F. M.; 
Bishop Foley, of Detroit, chaplain Rev. A. B. Oechtering; 
Bishop Horstmann, of Cleveland, chaplain Rev. F. Nigsch, 
C. PP. S.; Bishop Byrne, of Nashville, chaplain Rev. M. J. 
Byrne. The priests taking- part in the solemn ceremony were :- 
Rev. G. Horstmann, cross-bearer; Rev. T. Mungovan, book- 
bearer; Rev. J. Schmitz, mitre-bearer; Rev. J. Walsh, gremiale; 
Rev. J. Tremmel, censer-bearer; Revs. F. X. Labonte and J. F. 
Noll, acolythes; Very Rev. J. H. Guendling, assistant priest; 
Revs. H. T. Wilken and J. F. Delaney, deacons of honor; Rev. 
H. Boeckelmann, deacon, and Rev. John R. Quinlan, sub- 
deacon of the Mass; Revs. W. J. Quinlan, J. P. Durham, A. E. 
Lafontaine and P. J. O'Reilley, masters of ceremonies; Revs. 
L. A. Moench and B. Boebner, C. PP. S., chanters, and Rev. 
J. H. Bathe, notary. The preacher on the occasion was the 
Rev. Joseph Chartrand, private secretary to Bishop Chatard. 
The following was Bishop Alerding's first pastoral letter: 

"Herman Joseph, by the Grace of God and Favor of 
THE Apostolic See, Bishop of Fort Wayne. 

"To the Clergy and Laity of his diocese, greeting:- ■ 

"On this feast of St. Andrew, the thirtieth day of Novem- 
ber, in the year of Our Lord, 1900, the day of my consecration 



Bishop Herman Joseph Alerding, Coniinued. 57 

and elevation to the burden of the episcopate (Onus Episco- 
patus), I hasten to send you a word of greeting. You, the 
clergy, disinterested, self-sacrificing, zealous laborers in the 
Lord's vineyard, have done great and enduring deeds for God's 
glory and the salvation of souls. God's grace has been bountiful 
and your co-operation most generous. These premises given, 
the same glorious results are brought about at all times and in 
all places, as also in the diocese of Fort Wayne. The leadership 
of my predecessors in this favorite see, the Right Rev. John 
Henry Luers, the Right Rev. Joseph Dwenger, the Right Rev. 
Joseph Rademacher — not omitting the administration of Right 
Rev. Mgr. Julian Benoit, Very Rev. Joseph H. Brammer and 
Very Rev. John H. Guendling — has pointed you upward and 
onward. Lofty generalship has been at the head of the devoted 
priests of this diocese, and what wonder, if the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, throughout its length and breadth, is well established 
and well ordered. 

"To you, the laity, whole-souled and devoted to your 
spiritual guides, shall be given merited recognition. The 
result of your generous devotedness to holy religion is apparent 
everywhere, throughout the diocese. You have furnished the 
means to erect the numerous and magnificent churches, evi- 
dences of a faith truly active; for, none but a practically Catholic 
head and heart will contribute generously, when the great 
cause demands it. 

"The diocese may be quoted as an example worthy of 
emulation in the great work of Catholic education. Priests 
and people are a unit in the establishing, the upholding and the 
regulating of the schools. A prosperous school means a pros- 
perous parish, a poor shcool means a poor parish; no Catholic 
school means — 1 will not say — means no parish, but your 
imagination may picture the dreary condition and unpromising 
future of such a parish. 

"And, again, the different religious communities of men 
and women, laboring in charities of various kinds, dotting the 
diocese throughout with the evidences of prosperity and bound- 
less zeal — aye — and that institution of institutions, upon which 
the fire-fiend laid his heavy hand not less than four times in 
the current year, without causing this bulwark of faith and 
morals to waver even for a moment, in its great battles for 



58 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

science and religion — the University of Notre Dame. What a 
splendid record for the diocese of Fort Wayne. 

"Consecrated Chief Pastor of this diocese at the close of 
the ecclesiastical year 1900, and at the close, too, of the eccles- 
iastical nineteenth century; and looking back over all that has 
been accomplished in this diocese— so briefly enumerated and 
so imperfectly withal — need I tell you that my soul is all aglow 
with joy, trembling with gratitude to God. 

"But, dear brethren of the clergy, beloved children of the 
laity, what of the future, what of the twentieth century? Well, 
what of it? The clergy will continue to labor in the twentieth 
as they did in the nineteenth century; the laity will second the 
efforts of their priests in the twentieth as they did in the nine- 
teenth century. The new Bishop has been sent by the Pope, 
the same as his three predecessors had been sent by the Pope. 
The Holy Ghost rules the Church today, and will do so till the 
end of time, the same as He has done from the beginning. 
Let us be convinced, that the new century has even greater 
things in store for the church than the glorious acquisitions 
bestowed in the nineteenth century. 

"Profoundly grateful to God for all His blessings upon 
our beloved diocese, let us beg Him to continue His vigilant 
care over us in the future. May the Holy Ghost descend upon 
your humble servant, enlighten his intellect that he may under- 
stand his duties, strengthen his will, that he may firmly adhere 
to what is right and just. 

"May the blessing of Almighty God, of the Father ,and of 
the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, descend upon you, and remain 
always." — The letter was dated at Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
November 30, 1900. 

Bishop Alerding at once began to visit the various churches 
of his diocese, and has made it a rule to visit all of them at least 
once every three years. 

On September 30, 1903, he promulgated a Synod to be 
held on November 11th of the same year, in the Cathedral at 
Fort Wayne. The Synod was held and consisted of two sessions 
one in the forenoon, and one in the afternoon. The Statutes 
were officially published on March 19, 1904, and from that date 
were in full force. Among other things a new deanery was 
estabUshed, so that at present the diocese has six deaneries: 



Bishop Herman Joseph Alerding, Concluded. 59 

Fort Wayne, South Bend, Hammond, Logansport, Lafayette 
and Muncie. Heretofore each deanery was made to consist 
of certain parishes, but since the Synod each deanery consists 
of certain counties. 

Bishop Alerding was absent from his diocese from Septem- 
ber 7 to November 15, 1905, to comply with his obligation of 
the "visitatio ad limina Apostolorum." The clergy made use 
of the occasion of his departure, as an opportunity to present 
to their Bishop an address, replete with good wishes and 
heartfelt prayers for his safe journey to Rome, and a safe 
return. Along with the address a generous purse, by the priests, 
was presented. His return on November 15th was greeted 
with unusual demonstration of joy by the people. The Cathe- 
dral was packed, the long entrance to it left no passage way, 
and Calhoun street was crowded the entire length of the Cathe- 
dral Square. Amid the ringing of bells and a grand exhibition 
of fireworks, thousands of people stood in the rain, to bid the 
Bishop welcome home with deafning cheers. Mr. W. J. Breen 
delivered an address of welcome, at the Cathedral entrance. 
Having reached the sanctuary the Bishop addressed the vast 
audience. From this address we quote one paragraph : "When 
I knelt at the feet of the Supreme Pastor of the whole Church it 
seemed as if knelt there, every man, woman and child of the 
diocese of Fort Wayne. When I visited the great St. Peter's 
Cathedral, impressed with its vast proportions, I fancied I saw 
in the great sanctuary Pius the Tenth, in the full splendor of 
grandest church ceremonial, and kneeling there with me my 
eighty thousand and more diocesan children. Indeed the great 
Cathedral could accommodate them all." 

Bishop Alerding brought with him from Rome a large 
number of relics, to receive which, and to expose them for the 
veneration of the faithful, a place was prepared beneath the 
altar of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in the Cathedral. 



CHAPTER VII. 

DOMESTIC PRELATES OF HIS HOLINESS. 



1. THE RIGHT REV. MGR. JULIAN BENOIT, V. G. 

He was born in Septmoncel, a village in the great Jura 
mountain range, France, on October 17, 1808. He began his 
theological studies at the age of seventeen, and having com- 
pleted these studies, he was ordained subdeacon and deacon, 
not having attained the required age for priesthood. He was 
so impressed with Bishop Brute's sanctity and learning, that 
he emigrated to America, on June 1, 1836. He was ordained 
priest, by Bishop Brute, at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Balti- 
more, on St. Mark's day, 1837. His first appointment was at 
Leopold, near Evansville, Indiana. He was next sent to Rome, 
on the Ohio river, and then went to Chicago; from which place 
he also attended Lockport, Joliet and several other towns along 
the canal. After one year he returned to Leopold, spending 
there three and one-half years in hard missionary labor. During 
his stay at Leopold, he received a salary of $63.00. 

He was next sent to Fort Wayne, where he arrived on 
April 16, 1840. During the first six months, in Fort Wayne, 
he boarded with Francis Comparet. The church, at that time, 
was a frame structure rudely built, not plastered, 35x65 feet, 
with a few rough boards for benches. Father Benoit soon 
secured all the ground, known as Cathedral Square, and paid 
for it. His missionary field of labor comprised Lagro, Hunting- 
ton, Columbia City, Warsaw, Goshen, Avilla, New France, 
New Haven, Besancon, Hesse Cassel and Decatur. With the 
exception of a few canal towns, these visits had all to be made 
on horseback. During sickly seasons Father Benoit underwent 
incredible hardships, on account of sick-calls as far as Muncie, 
Indiana, and Defiance, Ohio. In 1845, he brought three 
Sisters of Providence to Fort Wayne, where he gave them a 
house completely furnished, and, towards enlarging the building, 
he contributed $5,000, in 1883. He built the present brick 



i 



Domestic Prelates, Continued. 61 

structure, on the corner of Jefferson and Clinton streets, for a 
school for boys. He also erected the first episcopal residence, 
the present clergy house, on Clinton street, at a cost of $16,000, 
mostly from his personal resources. 

Father Benoit visited New Orleans in 1853 and in 1860, 
soliciting funds for the building of the Fort Wayne Cathedral. 
In the autumn of 1861, the Cathedral was dedicated, having 
cost, including furniture, about $60,000. Father Benoit 
visited Europe in 1841, in 1865, remaining there about thirteen 
months; and in 1874, as a member of the first American pil- 
grimage, remaining from May till September, These visits 
were made principally in the interests of the diocese of Fort 
Wayne. Many honors were bestowed on Father Benoit. He 
was made Vicar General of the diocese of Vincennes, in 1852, 
and of Fort Wayne, in 1858. During Bishop Luers' visit to 
Europe, in 1865, Father Benoit was Admiinistrator of the 
diocese. At the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore, in 1866, 
he was the theologian of Bishop Luers. After the death of 
Bishop Luers, he was again Administrator of the diocese, from 
June, 1871, to April, 1872. He attended the four Provincial 
Councils, at Cincinnati, as theologian to the Bishop. In 1883, 
he was again Administrator of the diocese, during Bishop 
Dwenger's absence in Rome. A Papal Brief of Leo XI II, 
bearing date of June 12, 1883, conferred upon Father Benoit 
the honors and title of Domestic Prelate of His Holiness. The 
investiture took place in the Cathedral, on August 16th, of 
the same year. 

Father Benoit's interest in, and labors among, the Indians 
remains to be recorded. Remnants of the old Fort Wayne 
and the Council House of the Miami Indians, on East Main 
street, still stood when Father Benoit came. He proved a 
true friend and protector of the poor Indians, in their trans- 
actions with the United States government, and the post- 
traders. In 1848, the Indians received orders from the govern- 
ment to leave their reservations about Fort Wayne, and go to 
the territory assigned them in Kansas. They numbered about 
800, and were led by Chief Lafontaine, whom, together with 
his wife and children, Father Benoit had received into the 
Church. The Indians, however, refused to leave, unless Father 
Benoit would go with them. The government sent on some 



62 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

troops, and the captain, calling on Father Benoit, begged of 
him to lead the Indians away peaceably. Upon these repre- 
sentations Father Benoit secured the services of Father Neyron, 
the only survivor of the band of twenty-two priests, that came 
to Indiana with him, and started on his tour, to please the 
Indians and prevent bloodshed. The tribe started overland, 
in the summer of 1849, and Father Benoit went by canal boat 
to Cincinnati, thence over the Ohio and Mississippi to St. 
Louis, where he took the stage for the present Kansas City. 
He finally reached the reservation, marked out for the Indians 
by the government, and remained in the encampment with 
his beloved children of the forest, about two weeks. He 
returned home by stage the entire route, travelling nine days 
and nights in one continuous trip. Out of six persons in the 
group, he was the only one to endure the hardships of the trip 
in one continuous journey. 

Father Benoit's health began to fail, and when Bishop 
Dwenger returned from the Baltimore Council, in 1884, he 
found him complaining of a severe pain in his throat. Three 
leading physicians were called in, and pronounced his ailment 
to be cancer of the throat. Father Benoit recognized, that 
his remaining days on earth were few, and, with characteristic 
resignation, he remarked: "If Providence desires to take me 
by the throat, then God's will be done." An altar was erected 
in his room, and on Sunday morning, January 11, 1885, he 
offered the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, for the last time. He 
sufl'ered intensely, but he bore all in calm resignation to God's 
will. On Monday evening, January 26, 1885, having received 
all the consolations of religion, the heroic soul of the apostolic 
Father Benoit passed away. His remains rest in the Crypt 
of the Cathedral. 



2. THE RIGHT REV. MGR. JOHN H. OECHTERING, V. G. 

He was born December 23, 1845, at Lingen, Hanover, 
Germany, a son of Clement and Mary (Grotemeier) Oechtering. 
He attended the schools of his native city until twelve years of 
age, after which he spent two years at the Gymnasium, a school 
for the higher branches of literature and science, in the same 



Domestic Prelates, Concluded. 63 

city of Lingen. In 1858, he was sent to college in Munster 
and remained seven years, after which he spent two years at 
the University in the same city. In 1867, he entered the 
American College of Louvain, Belgium, as a candidate for the 
priesthood. He was ordained for the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
by the Co-adjutor Archbishop of MaHnes, May 21, 1869. Mgr. 
Oechtering came to America the same year, and was assigned 
to Elkhart, residing, however, at Mishawaka. He had charge 
of Elkhart one year, when he was transferred to St. Joseph's 
Church at Laporte, where he remained ten years. As pastor 
of St. Joseph's Church at Laporte he also attended Otis. On 
July 14, 1880, he was appointed pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Fort Wayne. For an account of Mgr. Oechtering's pastoral 
labors the reader is referred to the history of St. Joseph's 
Church, at Laporte, of Otis, and of St. Mary's Church at Fort 
Wayne. In 1888, he was named irremovable rector of the same 
church by Bishop Dwenger; in 1903, Vicar General of the diocese 
of Fort Wayne by Bishop Alerding; and in 1905, Domestic 
Prelate of His Holiness, Pope Pius X. Mgr. Oechtering is a 
ripe scholar: noted for several treatises of merit on Capital and 
Labor, Socialism, not to omit a number of dramas much admired 
for their original conception and classical fmish. The titles of 
these dramas are: Hermenegild, William Tell, and King Saul; 
a comedy: The Living Statue, and a farce: the Discovery of 
America. His Catechism of Church History for the higher 
grades of Catholic schools is doing good service to religion and 
bids fair, when better known, to be introduced in schools 
everywhere. Mgr. Oechtering is the Judge of the Matrimonial 
Court, Moderator of the Fort Wayne Deanery, Synodal Exam- 
iner and President of the School Board. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

THE CLERGY, DIOCESAN AND REGULAR. 

The list of names given in this chapter presents, in alpha- 
betical order, the names of priests, who have performed pas- 
toral functions in this diocese, from about 1669, till the present 
time: covering a period of fully two and one-third centuries. 
The diocesan clergy is numerically the strongest, but there are 
also many members of the C. S. C, the C. PP. S., the O. F. M., 
the O. S. B., and the S. J. A considerable number of these, 
both diocesan and regular, were transient only, but their names 
must not be omitted from the role of honor though, in a number 
of cases, the names could not be traced beyond a mere mention ; 
and these will be found, in their order, in the index for reference. 

For obvious reasons, these biographical sketches are 
brief. What is beyond the full name, the place and time of 
birth, the studies, the ordinations, the various appointments, 
and some incidents of a personal nature, must be looked for 
under the heads of parishes, to which they were assigned. 
Some estimate of the character and labors of deceased priests 
has been attempted, but with regard to priests, still Hving, the 
facts are simply stated without comment. God alone can 
judge and weigh the life of a priest, in the many details of multi- 
farious duties, at the altar, in the pulpit, in the confessional, in 
the baptistry, at the bedside of the dying, in the school, in mani- 
fold spiritual ministrations in the church, in his own house, in 
the homes of his parishoners ; not to mention the most arduous 
task of regulating the finances of the church property, with all 
that this duty implies, of collecting and administering the offer- 
ings of the faithful, in the interests of the parish. 

We have before us three letters of the Rev. Stephen 
Theodore Badin, addressed to the "Right Rev. Doctor Purcell, 
Athenseum, Cincinnati." They illustrate forcibly the labors 
incident to a pastoral and missionary life, and coming from the 
first priest ordained in the United States, will serve as intro- 
ductory to the biographies here presented. 



The Clergy, Continued. 65 

"Feb. 15, 183"4, Fort Wayne Inda. 

"Two months have elapsed since I left the Indian Village, 
having been detained here by various causes, bad weather, 
the infirmities of old age, pastoral avocations, and the various 
affairs incident to the building of a chapel at this place, pro- 
curing a piece of land for the honor of God etc. Meanwhile I 
have been informed that there is a number of Catholics towards 
the N. W. corner of your diocese, destitute of the benefits of 
the Church, and assailed by Methodist and Baptist preachers. 
1 am apprehensive that they are very ignorant etc, and conse- 
quently much exposed to be perverted. There is a Baptist 
mission for the Ottawa Indians in the same parts, wherein 
they have enticed some Catholics. 

"1 avail myself of the present opportunity, to enclose |10 
for four subscriptions to the Catholic Telegraph, namely 
Francis Comparet, Esq. Fort Wayne — Messrs. Aughinbaugh 
and Dubois, Fort Wayne, Inda., Mrs. Coquillard, South Bend, 
St. Joseph Cty., Inda., and Mr. D. Burr, P. M., Treaty Ground, 
Wabash Cty., Inda. Mr. Burr is pursuaded in his mind of the 
Catholic truths, and I hope that he will become a member and 
a benefactor of the Church." 

Father Badin quotes from the letter of one of the two 
"Charity Sisters" in the Indian Village on the St. Joseph river: 
"My dear Father, I am quite glad to inform you that we are 
so happy that we would not exchange our station for anything. 
Eliza Jackson." 

This first letter is signed: S. T. Badin, V. G. of Bardst. 
"May 10, 1834, South Bend, St. Joseph Cty., Inda. 

" Your favor of Feb. 25, was received a few days ago, owing 
to my various excursions and to the known neglect of post- 
masters. 1 sincerely condole with you on the embarrassments 
in which you have found your Diocese * * * But we must 
consider that nothing happens without the Divine permission, 
be resigned, bear patiently all afflictions (which are not rare in 
the holy ministry) and apply by humble, fervent and repeated 
prayers to the sovereign pastor of souls, who can alone supply 
our wants. In my little sphere I meet with difficulties little 
expected: I will not expatiate on this topic; but would beg 
your advice, if we could have this summer a confidential inter- 
view A. M. D. G. I must soon go to Fort Wayne, thence visit 



66 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the forks of the Wabash, where many Irish and German Cath- 
oHcs have been expecting me, who are employed in digging a 
canal, and are desirous of building a chapel. Thence I should 
go to Logansport eighty or ninety miles west of Fort Wayne. 
I am besides engaged in making a new establishment near this 
place for an orphan house, and I must begin with erecting a 
chapel. You may perceive that at the age of 66 I have a 
suificient share of toils. I would wish rather to enjoy solitude 
and retirement, in order to prepare for my fast approaching 
dissolution. * * * It is true, we have books enough to 
defend our holy religion, but they are not, or but little read by 
the generality of men, whereas a public, authoritative declara- 
tion of the American Bishops, which would be inserted in many 
American papers, would excite attention. * * *" 

This second letter is signed: Stephen Theod. Badin. 
"September 23, 1834, Huntington (Town) Huntington 
Cty. Inda. 

"The date of this letter reminds me that this day 42 years 
ago, the 1st Bishop of Baltimore ordained the first sub-deacon 
of his Diocese, and gave the tonsure and minor orders to 3 or 4 
ordinandi. — Time has brought many changes and ameliora- 
tions, or rather the Divine Pastor has given an incalculable 
increase to the sheep and lambs. There were then about 30 
priests in the U. S. * * * My intention, when I left home 
12 days ago, was to answer the honor of your invitation. But 
first, we have many sick people along the canal lines. Second, 
when 1 am in Logansport at the mouth of Eel river (into the 
Wabash) the shortest road to Louisville, where my own affairs 
call me, will be by Indianapolis. Third, I have been informed 
by the CathoHc Herald that the consecration of the excellent 
Bishop of Vincennes is to take place on the first Sunday of 
October in Bardstown, where most probably I will have the 
opportunity of seeing you. In fine I may return by Cincinnati- 
for I have not money for traveling expenses. 

"In consequence of more than one considerable wrong 
done me I am reduced to distress, am in debt, received no salary, 
and withal have spent considerable sums to establish the 
Church in these backwoods. I speak not of labors, privations. 
My trust is in Divine Providence, which fails not. * * * 

"To serve you it would be gratifying to me to extend my 



The Clergy, Continued. 67 

labors to the N. W. of your diocese, but the above date of my 
ordination has already informed you that I am more than 66 
years of age, and considering that 1 do ride almost incessantly 
to attend 5 congregations on three lines of about 80 miles each, 
it would prove a deception and a presumption to attempt more 
than I do at present. Indeed I am compelled from debility to 
use many precautions, which I disregarded in former periods 
of life. 

"It may happen that Divine providence will not permit 
me to see the Angel of Vincennes. I had intended to write to 
congratulate him and his Diocese on his promotion, which has 
filled me with consolations; but having been made uncertain of 
the place and time where and when he was to be consecrated, 
and being often destitute either of time or even of conveniences 
in the miserable, crowded cabins where I must lodge in traveling, 
feeling also frequent fatigues, I have not yet satisfied my heart 
in presenting him my best respects, and in assuring him in my 
readiness to cooperate with and assist him in his exertions to 
establish and extend the kingdom of God in his new Diocese; 
wherefor I beg of you the favor to communicate these lines to 
him." 

Having mentioned the Irish, the Canadians and the French, 
Father Badin continues: "As to the Indians, the greater num- 
ber of them being Christians, are on the boarders of Michigan, 
under the direction of the excellent priest, Mons. de Seille. 
He made this summer two excursions among the Pottawot- 
tamies of Tippecanoe river and baptised 76 of them the first 
Sunday of May, and 60 more the first Sunday of this month. 
The Pottawottamies of Michigan have sold all their land, and 
must emigrate within two years, but those of Tippecanoe have 
retained their Reserves of land, and may form a Catholic mission 
in the Diocese of Vincennes. The Indians are our best congre- 
gations. — Town lots have been procured in five or six different 
places, viz. South Bend (one and a half miles from my estab- 
lishment on St. Joseph river), Fort Wayne, Huntington, Wabash 
and Logansport. Three years ago I obtained also of Judge 
Hood two acres in the town of Peru, and prevailed on him to 
make his offer to Bishop Flaget; but as he did not answer the 
polite letter, and lots have become very valuable at Peru, there 
will perhaps be a demur. I caused the lot of Huntington to 



68 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

be deeded to Bishop Flaget — but the donor of eleven acres in 
Wabash, being a friend of mine, preferred to give me his obh- 
gation for the same and I did not insist otherwise from motives 
of politeness and prudence. 

"Our resources must be in the education of youth. Mr. 
Comparet estimates that the congregation in and about Fort 
Wayne must amount to 100 families. Prevailing sickness and 
mortality, the absence of pastor and poverty have prevented 
the forwarding of church aflfairs. No time should be lost in 
forwarding the erection of chapels along the canal line, because 
as soon as the work is done in one section of the country the 
Catholic hands move to another section, and the prospect of 
such erections diminishes or vanishes. — This has been evidenced 
in Fort Wayne: the timber alone has been secured. There 
should be two priests riding constantly every week along a line 
of 80 miles. They should be active, pious, learned and dis- 
interested, courageous and mortified. * * *" 

This third letter is signed: S. T. Badin, Protosa. Baltim. 



THE REV. DIONYSIUS ABARTH, O. F. M. 

He was born June 6, 1823; entered the Order August 12, 
1842; ordained priest July 12, 1846; came to America in 1855; 
at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from July, 1869, to Sep- 
tember, 1870; died in Louisville, Kentucky, November 20, 1882. 



THE REV. BERNARDINE ABBINK, O. S. F. 

He was born at Cleveland, Ohio, October 20, 1850. He 
received his classical education, philosophical and theological 
courses, at Cross Village, Michigan. He was ordained priest 
at Cross Village, by Bishop Borgess, on July 25, 1879. He 
labored up to 1896 among the Indians in upper Michigan, 
since which time he has been the chaplain at the Old Peoples' 
Home, at Avilla. 



THE REV. JOSEPH ABEL. 

He was born February 15, 1861, in Dorsten, Diocese of 
Munster, Germany. He studied the classics at St. Joseph's 
College, near Rensselaer, philosophy at St. Francis, Wisconsin, 



i 



The Clergy, Continued. 69 

and theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding on June 21, 1901, in 
the Cathedral at Fort Wayne. His first appointment was 
assistant at St. Joseph's Church, Hammond, till June 6, 1902. 
On that date he was appointed pastor of St. Patrick's Church 
at Walkerton. The missions Hamlet, Bremen and the station 
Knox, are attended from Walkerton. 



THE REV. A. ADAM. 

He immigrated to this country on occasion of one of 
Father Sorin's visits to Europe. Father Adam for a few years 
resided in the French settlement north of Fort Wayne, where 
he built the Academy of the Sacred Heart, the church and 
priest's house of St. Vincent's Congregation. He became the 
resident pastor of St. Louis' Church at Besancon, on January 
1, 1870. In 1875, Father Adam with Bishop Dwenger's per- 
mission, returned to France. Here, after serving for two years 
as chaplain in the Navy, he was appointed to a model parish, 
in the center of France, by the Bishop of Tours. His church 
there was over a thousand years old. He remained in France 
until 1905, when, an old man of seventy three years and after 
fifty years of hard priestly labor, he begged his Bishop for 
permission to pass his remaining days in the Trappist Com- 
munity, in Kentucky. He returned to the United States for 
that purpose, owing to the persecution of religious orders in 
France. However, being too aged for the rigorous Trappists' 
rule, the venerable priest was readmitted to the Diocese of 
Fort Wayne, and appointed chaplain to the Sisters of St. 
Joseph, at their Mother House near Tipton. 



THE REV. CLAUDE ALLOUEZ, S. J. 

He was born at Saint Didier, en Forest, France. He 
studied in the College of Puy en Velay, where he was under 
the direction of St. Francis Regis. He entered the Society of 



70 The Diocese of Fort Wayne, 

Jesus, and in 1658 was sent to Canada, His first labors were 
near Quebec, but on August 16, 1665, he left Three Rivers for 
his great Western Mission. He created the missions around 
Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. In 1680 he built three 
chapels: One at Pokegan, another near the Lakes of Notre 
Dame, and the third near the fort of the Pottawottamies. He 
died on August 28, 1689, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. 
His successors in the order named were, Rev. Claude Aveneau, 
S. J.. Rev. James Gravier, S. J. and Rev. John B. Chardon, 
S. J., until 1759. In this year. Fort St. Joseph was reduced 
by English soldiers, the survivors taken prisoners and carried 
away to Quebec. The mission was not reorganized until the 
arrival of Father Badin, in 1830. 



THE REV. PHILIBERT ALTSTAETTER, O. F. M. 

He was born March 18, 1858; entered the Order September 
4, 1875; ordained priest March 12, 1881; assistant at St. Boni- 
face's Church, Lafayette, from May 1881 to August 1884; 
attended Schimmels, from May to August 25, 1881, residing at 
Lafayette. 



THE REV. GEORGE ANGERMAIER. 

He was born on April 15, 1876, in Engelpolding, Arch- 
diocese of Munich, Bockhorn, Bavaria, Germany. He 
attended^ the parochial schools of his native town. He made 
his classical studies at St. Benedict's College, Atchison, Kansas; 
philosophy and theology at St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was 
ordained priest by Bishop Alerding in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, on June 22, 1906. Returning from a visit to his native 
place, he was appointed assistant at Decatur on September 
16, 1906. 



The Clergy, Continued. 71 

THE REV. VENANTIUS ARNOLD, O. F. M. 

He was born on December 19, 1833; entered the Order 
October 28, 1850; ordained priest December 20, 1856; came to 
America in May, 1860; pastor of St. Boniface's Church, Lafay- 
ette, from December 1865 to July 1869; returned to Europe, 
August, 1874; died at Salzburg, Austria, May 27, 1895. 



THE REV. VINCENT BACQUELIN. 

He was a native of France; and was ordained priest at 
Emmittsburg, Maryland, April 25th, 1837. He celebrated Mass 
shortly after his ordination in a log tavern, at Anderson, 
residing at Shelbyville. From here he also visited Cicero. 
He met his death, while returning from a missionary trip, on 
September 2, 1846, in Rush county, being thrown by his 
horse against a tree, killing him almost instantly. 



THE VERY REV. STEPHEN THEODORE BADIN, V. G. 

He was born in Orleans France, on July 17, 1763. He 
studied with the Sulpicians in his native city. The French 
Revolution having closed their seminary, young Badin, after 
receiving Subdeaconship, emigrated to America and reached 
Baltimore, March 28, 1792. Bishop Carroll ordained him a 
priest, on May 25, 1793, the first ordination of a priest in the 
United States. On September 6, 1793, he, with Father Bar- 
rieres, left Baltimore and after a most laborious journey on 
foot to Pittsburg, by boat on the Ohio to Maysville, and again 
on foot to Lexington, where he arrived on December 1, 1793. 
In 1830, the Pottawottamie chief, Pokagon, induced the Very 
Rev. Gabriel Richard, Vicar General of the Diocese of Cin- 
cinnati, residing at Detroit, to secure Father Badin from the 
Kentucky missions for the region of the present Notre Dame. 
Father Badin built a log chapel on St. Mary's Lake. It was 
24x40 feet, and served the purposes of a chapel and the priest's 
residence. He also bought a section of land from the United 
States Government, intended for the site of the future great 



72 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

University. In 1842, he transferred the title of this land to 
the Fathers of the Holy Cross; which makes him the founder 
in fact of Notre Dame. The Catholic Historian Shea, under 
chapter X, giving the years 1829 to 1832, says: "The veteran 
priest Stephen T. Badin was laboring among the Pottawot- 
tamies near South Bend, Indiana. The Baptists soon aban- 
doned the mission attempted by them, and he was encouraged 
in his efforts to revive the teachings of the early missionaries." 
And again: "The Venerable Badin, living with the Indian 
Chief Pokagon, not only attended his Indians, but a French 
village and two future sees, Fort Wayne and Chicago." 

Father Badin assisted at the burial of Bishop Flaget, who 
died on February 11, 1850. After that he withdrew to Cin- 
cinnati, where he died April 21, 1853. In May 1906, his remains 
were transferred from the Cathedral at Cincinnati to Notre 
Dame, where they now rest in a log chapel, the exact reproduc- 
tion of the first chapel built by the zealous missionary on St. 
Mary's Lakes. 



THE REV. JOACHIM BAKER. 

The sixth of a family of nine children, was born on March 
7, 1863, to Jacob and Agatha (Meyer) Baker, at Fort Wayne, 
His parents were natives of Hesse Darmstadt and Baden, 
Germany, but were married at Fort Wayne. His father was 
engaged in saw-milling. Father Baker attended St. Mary's 
parochial school and also the Cathedral school. In 1879 he 
entered St. Lawrence's College at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin. 
Having completed his classical studies, he was received into 
St. Francis' Seminary, where he studied philosophy and the- 
ology. Archbishop Heiss ordained him deacon on March 19, 
1888, and he was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger on June 
29th, of the same year. His first appointment was that of 
pastor at Portland, in Jay county. Until a residence could be 
built, he resided at Decatur, when in January of 1889, he moved 
into the priest's house at Portland, and became its first resident 
pastor. During his pastorate there, he had charge of Dunkirk, 
Red Key and Ridgeville, as missions. In August 1891, he was 
transferred to St. Anthony's, with Goodland for a mission. ! 



I The Clergy, Continued. 73 

His next and present appointment was that of Alexandria, 
where he arrived on January 11, 1896. Here again he was the 
first resident pastor. 



THE REV. EDWARD F. BARRETT. 

He was born in Rutland, Vermont, in the diocese of Bur- 
lington, on December 22, 1867. He attended the parochial 
schools of his native parish, made his classical studies at 
Assumption College, Canada, and his theological studies at 
Assumption Seminary. He was ordained priest by Right Rev. 
L. F. Lafleche, on July 14, 1895, at Boloeil, Canada. He was 
assistant at St. Patrick's Church, Fort Wayne, until February 
27, 1897, when he was appointed the second resident pastor 
of All Saints' Church, at Hammond, where he is at the present 
time. He is a member of the Diocesan School Board. 



THE REV. SIMON BARTOSZ. 

He was born at Posen, Prussia, in 1810; ordained priest, 
March 26, 1836; came to America, in 1865. In 1866 he attended 
Hanover Centre; from 1867 to 1870, he was the pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, Laporte, succeeding Father Konen. He died 
January 28, 1872, and is buried in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. JOHN HENRY BATHE. 

He was born May 20, 1854, near Delbrueck, diocese of 
Paderborn, Germany, a son of John H. and Theresa (Sandbote) 
Bathe, and attended the parochial school of his district, until 
thirteen years of age. Having finished his classical course at 
Paderborn, in 1872, he completed his philosophical studies in 
the same city, and devoted one and a half years to the study 
of theology in Munster. He emigrated to America, in the 
spring of 1875, and spent another year and a half in the study 
of theology, in St. Francis' Seminary, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



74 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

He was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, on February 16, 
1877, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne. His first appointment 
was that of pastor at Schererville, from February 16, 1877 to 
December 30, 1881. After that he was sent to Wabash, from 
December 30, 1881 to May 16, 1898. From Wabash he was 
sent to Valparaiso, but owing to ill health, he remained only 
from May 16, to July 26, 1898. Bishop Rademacher then 
appointed him Chancellor of the diocese, which position he 
filled from September 16, 1898 to July 1, 1905. In this position 
he served under Bishop Rademacher, the Administrator, Very 
Rev. J. H. Guendling and Bishop Alerding. It was his desire 
to be relieved of the office of Chancellor, and he was appointed 
pastor of St. Mary's Church, at Avilla, on July 1, 1905. Father 
Bathe is one of the Synodal Examiners of the diocese. 



THE REV. FRANCIS XAVIER BAUMGARTNER. 

He was born on May 1, 1851, at Montlingen, diocese of 
St. Gallen, Switzerland. He came to America on October 19, 
1864, and was ordained priest, on March 14, 1874. His name 
appears on the baptismal records of the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne on March 22, 1874. From 1875 to December 19, 1880, 
he was pastor of Lottaville (Turkey Creek), attending to 
Hobart and Hammond as missions. He was the second resident 
pastor of Kentland, attending to Goodland as a mission, from 
December 19, 1880 to March 27, 1883. From April 7, 1883 to 
May 9, 1885, he was the first resident pastor of St. Joseph's 
Church at Hammond, attending to Hobart as a mission until 
February 1885. He died May 9, 1885, and his remains are 
buried at Lottaville. 



THE REV. FREDERICK BAUMGARTNER, C. PP. S. 

He was born on June 19, 1862, at Notzingen, Archdiocese 
of Freiburg, Germany; came to America on October 8, 1881; 
ordained priest at Cincinnati, on March 8, 1890. He was the 
pastor of Pulaski from 1890 to 1892. 



i 



The Clergy, Continued. 75 

THE REV. JULIUS BECKS. 

He was born, on October 8, 1836, at Laar, Westphalia, 
Germany. He arrived in this country on June 26, 1858. 
Having completed his course of theology at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, he was ordained priest, on Decem- 
ber 25, 1862, by Bishop Luers, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne. 
From January 1863 to September 1864, he was pastor of St. 
Mary's Church at Decatur. He was pastor of St Mary's Church 
at Michigan City from September 24, 1864 until February 15, 
1885. Until November 1, 1867, when St. Ambrose and St. 
Mary's parishes became one, he had services in both churches. 
From Michigan City he also attended Schimmels, as a mission. 
From August 1891 till August 1894, he was pastor of 
Lagro. He had charge of Oxford, from September 1894 to 
June 1895. His name appears on the baptismal records of 
the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne on September 8, 1895. For 
six months of the first half of 1896, he was pastor of St. Peter's 
Church, at Laporte. Owing to ill health, he was assigned to 
St. John's Hospital at Anderson, as chaplain, where he died on 
March 14, 1902. His remains rest in the cemeteiy at Michigan 
City. 



THE REV. ACCURSIUS BEINE, O. F. M. 

He was born August 15, 1832; entered the Order October 
4, 1860; ordained priest November 7, 1862; pastor of St. 
Boniface's Church at Lafayette, from September 1870 to Jan- 
uary 1878; died in Louisville, Kentucky, March 13, 1888. 



THE REV. MAXIMILIAN BENZINGER. 

He was born in Wuertemberg, Germany, October 7, 1848, 
son of Michael and Elisabeth (Mueller) Benzinger. He studied 
at St. John's, Minnesota, and Calvary College, Wisconsin, and 
finished his theology at St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. He was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in 
the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 11, 1884. He was 



76 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

pastor of St. Michael's at Summit, from July 4, 1884 to October 
17, 1897. He has been pastor of Hesse Cassel, since October 
17, 1897. 



THE REV. HENRY BERBERICH, O. F. M. 

He was born December 23, 1858; entered the Order, 
September 14, 1876; ordained priest April 16, 1882; assistant 
in Lafayette, from December 1887 to August 1890, at St. 
Boniface's Church. 



THE REV. JOHN B. BERG. 

He was born in Edingen, near Treves, Rhine-province, 
Germany, August 20, 1864. He emigrated to America in 
August, 1880. He studied the classics in St. Lawrence's College, 
Mount Calvary, Wisconsin; his philosophy and first year of 
theology in St. Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, and completed 
his theology in St. Vincent's Seminary, West Moreland, Penn- 
sylvania. He was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in 
Fort Wayne, on June 15, 1889. His appointments were: 
Pastor of Reynolds, with Medaryville and Francisville as mis- 
sions; pastor of Alexandria, from June 8, 1893 to October 16, 
1893; pastor of Remington, from October 16, 1893 to July 4, 
1905; pastor of Whiting, since July 4, 1905. He is a member 
of the Diocesan Building Committee. 



THE REV. WILLIAM BERG. 

He was born on March 25, 1854, in Edingen, diocese of 
Treves, Germany. He made his classical studies at Paderborn, 
philosophy and theology in Munster, Germany. He was 
ordained priest in Osnabrueck, Germany, by Bishop Beckmann, 
on May 26, 1877. At the time of his ordination the so called 
Kultur-kampf had full sway in Germany. The Bishop of 
Munster having been imprisoned, he was ordained by Bishop 
Beckmann very early in the morning behind locked doors. 



The Clergy, Continued. 77 

He emigrated to this country, arriving at Fort Wayne, on July 
11, 1877. His first appointment was that of pastor of St. 
Martin's Church, Hanover Centre, from August 1877 till June 
9, 1881. He received his present appointment, pastor of St. 
Michael's Church, Schererville, on June 9, 1881. in F"ebruary 
1903, Bishop Alerding appointed him dean of the Hammond 
district. He is a member of the Diocesan School Board. 



THE RIGHT REV. MGR. AUGUST BESSONIES, V. G. 

He was born in Alzac, department du Lot, province of 
Quercy, France, on June 17, 1815. Having emigrated to 
America, he was ordained priest by Bishop de la Hailandiere, 
at Vincennes, on February 22, 1840. From March 11, 1853 to 
February 1, 1854, he was pastor at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, 
during the absence of Father Benoit. He was named Right 
Rev. Monsignore, January 22, 1884. He died at Indianapolis, 
on February 22, 1901. 



THE REV. AUGUSTINE BEYER, O. F. M. 

He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 25,1 849 ; ordained 
priest at Cincinnati, on May 25, 1872. He attended St. Joseph's 
Church at Reynolds sometime between the years 1876 and 1888, 
residing at Lafayette. 



THE REV. JOHN BIEDERMANN. 

He was born on February 11, 1867, at Bendern, Lichten- 
stein. Diocese of Chur, Switzerland. He attended the parochial 
school of his native city, and at the age of thirteen, he entered 
the College of "Mary of Perpetual Help" at Schwyz, Switzer- 
land. He pursued his philosophical course at Innsbruck, Tyrol, 
from 1886 to 1887, and his theological course at the Diocesan 
Seminary of Chur Schwyz, from 1 887 to 1 89 1 . He was ordained 
priest, by the Right Rev. Bishop Fidelis Battagli, on July 20, 



78 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1890. Having celebrated his first Mass, on August 5, 1890, he 
returned to the Seminary for another year. He was pastor, of 
Ruggell, Lichtenstein, from September 18, 1891 to February 
1901. On April 1, 1901, he arrived in this country. From 
April 15th to September 30, 1901, he was assistant at St. Paul's 
Church, Fort Wayne; and from October 1st, of the same year 
till June 30, 1905, he was assistant at St. Peter's Church, in the 
same city. On June 30, 1905, he was appointed pastor of 
Nix Settlement, with Roanoke for a mission. 



THE REV. BALTHASAR BIEGEL. 

He was born at Hanover Centre, Lake county, Indiana, 
on August 6, 1866. The Rev. William Berg gave him private 
lessons, after which he entered St. Lawrence's College, Mount 
Calvary, Wisconsin, where he finished his classical course, in 
June 1885. He studied philosophy and theology, at St. Francis' 
Seminary, Milwaukee, and was ordained a priest, with a fourteen 
months dispensation, by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at 
Fort Wayne, on June 15, 1889. His first and present appoint- 
ment was that of the first resident pastor at Elwood, since 
July 29, 1889. From the spring of 1892 till June 1893, he 
attended Alexandria, and again, from October 1893 till Decem- 
ber 1895. He also attended Cicero, from March till September 
10, 1898. 



THE REV. F. JOSEPH BILSTEIN. 

He was born in Oestinghausen, diocese of Paderborn, 
Germany, on February 12, 1867. He studied the classics at 
Havestadt and Paderborn, emigrated to this country, and 
studied philosophy and theology in the Seminary of St. Francis, 
Wisconsin. He was ordained priest by Bishop O'Hara, for the 
diocese of Scranton, at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, on June 7, 
1891. He was assistant at St. Nicholas' Church at Wilkesbarre, 
Penn. till October 1895, when he came to Fort Wayne. Assis- 
tant at St. Paul's Church, Fort Wayne, October 1895 till 
February 1898; pastor of St. Anthony's, Goodland and Morocco, 
from February 1898 till October 1900; pastor of Monterey, with, 
Rochester, Kouts and Culver as missions, since October 7, 1900. 



• The Clergy, Continued. . 79 

THE REV. SEBASTIAN BIRNBAUM, C. PP. S. 

He was born on May 3, 1825,in Wappershausen, Wuertem- 
berg, diocese of Rottenburg, Germany. He came to America, 
on June 7, 1864, and was ordained priest, on January 10, 1867. 
He assisted Rev. Wolfgang Giedl during his sickness, and upon 
his death, on May 23, 1873, Father Birnbaum, became the 
pastor of New Haven, remaining until July 1875. 



THE REV. MICHAEL J. BIRO, C. S. C. 

He was born in Szikszo, Hungary, October 5, 1863. His 
classical studies were made at Eger, Hungary, with the Cis- 
tercian Monks. He emigrated to America in 1893, and entered 
the Congregation of the Holy Cross, on August 15, 1897; 
profession, August 15, 1899. He completed his theological 
studies at the Catholic University, Washington, D. C, where 
he was ordained priest, by Bishop O'Gorman, of Sioux Falls, 
on February 8, 1900. He was appointed to organize the first 
Hungarian Congregation in South Bend, St. Stephen's. He 
was a member of the committee selected by the Hungarians of 
America to assist at the unveiling of a statue of George Wash- 
ington, at Budha-Pesth, Hungary. He continues in the pas- 
torate of St. Stephen's Church at the present time. 



THE REV. JOHN BLECKMANN. 

He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 5, 1846. He 
received his primary education in St. Joseph's school, of the 
same city. At the age of fifteen, he was adopted by Bishop 
Luers, for the diocese of Fort Wayne and was sent to St. 
Xavier's College; after that, he was sent to Notre Dame for 
his philosophical course, where he graduated in June, 1866. 
He completed his theological course, at Mount St. Mary's of 
the West, and was ordained priest, by Bishop Luers, in St. 
Joseph's Church, at Cincinnati, on April 27, 1870. He was 
made assistant to the Rev. Lawrence Lamoor, at Union City; 
where he remained for nine months, attending also the mis- 
sions Muncie, Winchester, Hartford City, Dunkirk, Portland 



80 . The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

and Ridgeville. He next was made pastor of Attica, from 
where he attended various missions scattered through Foun- 
tain, Warren, and part of Tippecanoe, counties, such as Cov- 
ington and Marshfield. Having had charge of Attica, from 
December 1870 until May 1875, he was transferred to Delphi. 
On February 15, 1885, Bishop Dwenger appointed him pastor 
of St. Mary's Church, at Michigan City. In 1895, he cele- 
brated his Silver Jubilee as priest: three bishops honored the 
occasion with their presence. Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids, 
Bishop Marty of Sioux Falls, and Bishop Rademacher of Fort 
Wayne, together with more than one hundred priests. After 
the celebration, he took a trip to Europe, where he had the 
honor of an audience with Pope Leo XI II. He returned on 
August 29, 1895, and remains to this day pastor of St. Mary's 
Church. He is the dean of the South Bend district. 



THE REV. JOHN BLECKMANN. 

He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 9, 1882. He 
attended the parochial school of his native parish, and made 
his classical studies at St. Xavier's College, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
He began and finished his studies in philosophy and theology, 
at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cedar Point, Ohio. He re- 
ceived tonsure and first two Minor Orders, in June, 1905; the 
other two Minor Orders, on June 21, 1906; Subdeaconship on 
March 15th, Deaconship March 16th, 1907, all at the Seminary. 
He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on May 22, 1907. His first appointment was 
that of assistant at St. Mary's Church, Michigan City, on 
June 8, 1907. 



THE REV. JOHN BLUM. 

He was born in Rubenheim, Bavaria, Germany, on Novem- 
ber 8, 1866. He studied the classics in Mount Calvary, Wis- 
consin, his theology in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
and was ordained priest by Archbishop Elder in Cincinnati, on 
June 22, 1892. His appointments were: Pastor of Frankfort 
and missions, from July 1, 1892 till December 24, 1895; pastor 



The Clergy, Continued. 81 

of Reynolds and missions, from December 24, 1895 till Novem- 
ber 1, 1896; assistant at Decatur, from November 1, 1896 till 
November 1, 1900; pastor of Kewanna (Grass Creek) and its 
mission, Lucerne, from November 1, 1900 till June 8, 1902; 
assistant at St. Ann's Church, Lafayette, from July 1905 till 
December 28, 1905. 



THE REV. EDWARD J. BOCCARD. 

He was born November 20, 1862, in St. Vincent's Parish, 
Allen county, near Fort Wayne. He studied the classics in 
St. Lawrence's College, at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin ; phi- 
losophy and theology in St. Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin. 
He was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on June 15, 1889. His appointments were: 
Pastor of Nix Settlement and Roanoke, from July 2, 1889 till 
November 1895; pastor of Auburn, from November 1895 till 
September 1898; pastor of Kewanna and Lucerne, from Sep- 
tember 1898 till October 1900; acting pastor of Columbia 
City, from October 1900 to May 1901; pastor at Delphi, since 
July 9, 1901. 



THE REV. HENRY A. BOECKELMANN. 

He was born March 31, 1851, in Oster Kappeln, Hanover, 
diocese of Osnabrueck, Germany, a son of Francis and Anna 
(Schroeder) Boeckelmann. The family emigrated to the 
United States, in 1853, and located in Logansport, where the 
father died, September 20, 1882. He attended the parochial 
school at Logansport until 16 years of age, when he entered 
the College of the Christian Brothers at St. Louis, Missouri. 
From there he was sent to St. Viateur's College, Bourbonnais, 
Illinois, to make his philosophical and theological course and 
was ordained priest, by Bishop Foley of Chicago, on August 
30, 1877. He was engaged as teacher at the college for one 
year, and on July 27, 1878, he was appointed pastor of St. 
John's Church, at Goshen and remained there until November 
26, 1880, on which date, he was transferred to the Cathedral 



82 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

at Fort Wayne. On February 15, 1885, he was appointed 
pastor at Delphi, where he continued until December 30, 1891. 
He was pastor of St. Vincent's Church at Elkhart, from Decem- 
ber 30, 1891 till October 4, 1906, the date of his death. Father 
Boeckelmann was noted for his uniform genial character, 
making him a most desirable companion, and also for the zeal 
and earnestness with which he performed every duty entrusted 
to him. One of the offices held by him was that of Synodal 
Examiner. He was also a member of the Diocesan School 
Board. 



THE REV. JOSEPH BOLKA. 

He was born on March 16, 1875, near Otis, Indiana. He 
made his classical, philosophical and theological studies at St. 
Francis, Wisconsin. Having completed his studies, he was 
ordained priest by Archbishop Katzer, at Milwaukee, on May 
28, 1899. He was appointed pastor of North Judson, remain- 
ing until November 25, 1904, when he received his present 
appointment, that of pastor of St. Stanislaus' Church, East 
Chicago. 



THE REV. BERNARD THEODORE BORG. 

He was born in Bexten, Hanover, Germany, on March 
8, 1836. He studied the classics at St. Vincent's, Pennsyl- 
vania, and philosophy and theology in St. Mary's Seminary, 
Baltimore, Maryland. He was ordained priest, by Archbishop 
Spalding of Baltimore, on June 30, 1868. His appointments 
were the following:- Assistant at St. Charles' Church, Peru, 
attending to Kokomo, Marion, and Tipton as missions, and to 
Fairmount as a station; pastor at Dyer, from July 1870 till 
September 1871; accompanied Bishop Dwenger to Rome, in 
1874; assistant at the Cathedral, till 1877; assistant at St. 
Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, till 1878; chaplain at the Old 
Peoples' Home, Avilla, till 1887; chaplain at St. Vincent's 
Orphan Asylum, Fort Wayne, from 1887 till December 22, 
1904, the date of his death. His remains rest in the cemetery 
at Fort Wayne. 



The Clergy, Continued. 83 

THE REV. ALEXIUS BOTTI. 

He was the pastor of St. Vincent's, in Allen county, from 
1858 to 1860, visiting from here New Haven once every month 
during the year 1858. From 1860 to 1871, he was pastor of 
St. Paul's Church at Valparaiso, attending Hobart as a mission. 
He died September 14, 1872, at the age of sixty-five, and is 
buried in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. P. J. BOURGET, C. S. C. 

He was one of the pastors of St. Joseph's Church at South 
Bend, attending the same from Notre Dame, prior to 1869. 
He died June 12, 1862, and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE VERY REV. JOSEPH HENRY BRAMMER, V. G. 

He was born in Hanover, Germany, on October 1, 1839. 
The faith of his parents was the Lutheran. He was a car- 
penter by trade, and emigrating to America, in 1854, he settled 
in St. Louis. His nature was deeply religious, and after listen- 
ing to lectures on Catholic doctrines, and having still farther 
studied the same earnestly and sincerely, he was received into 
the CathoHc Church, in 1859. He determined to devote his 
life to the conversion and guidance of souls. He completed 
his study of philosophy and theology in Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was ordained priest at 
Fort Wayne on May 11, 1868. He was appointed assistant 
priest at the Cathedral. Upon the death of Father Benoit, he 
was made Vicar General of the diocese and pastor of the Cathe- 
dral. During Bishop Dwenger's absence, in 1885, and again in 
1888, he was Administrator of the diocese; and in fact during 
the protracted illness of Bishop Dwenger, the arduous duties 
of the diocesan administration, as well as the care of the parish, 
devolved entirely upon him 

In 1880, he erected the imposing building in Cathedral 



84 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Square, known as Library Hall. About this time he took a 
trip to Europe, where he also visited Ireland. In 1886, he 
became largely instrumental in the building of St. Vincent's 
Orphan Asylum. Ten years later, in 1896, he undertook and 
successfully accomplished the thorough restoration of the 
Cathedral building. 

Father Brammer organized the St. Vincent de Paul Society 
in the Cathedral parish. He loved all men of whatever color, 
race or creed; he saw in everyone the image of God, a soul to 
be saved. He was known to have given away the last dollar, 
and to have borrowed money to assist the poor. 

It can be said of him, that he took the deepest interest in 
the welfare and advancement of the Cathedral schools: he 
loved children with a special affection. 

The continuous and arduous labors of Father Brammer 
gradually undermined his health, and for several years he was 
far from being well. His declining health only served to make 
him center his thoughts on the hereafter. His strength failed 
him from day to day, until having received the Last Sacra- 
ments, while yet in complete possession of his faculties, he 
surrendered his soul into the keeping of his Maker on Monday 
June 20, 1898. His remains rest in the Crypt of the Cathedral. 



THE REV. CLEMENTINE BROERMANN, O. F. M. 

He was born November 7, 1873; entered the Order, 
August 15, 1890; ordained priest July 24, 1897; assistant in 
Lafayette, from August 1897 to November 1898, at St. Boni- 
face's Church. 



i 



THE REV. ADAM M. BUCHHEIT. 

He was born October 25, 1861, in Decatur, Indiana, a son 
of Adam and Elisabeth (Weber) Buchheit, natives of Germany. 
In 1862, the family moved to Fort Wayne. Adam received 
his elementary education in St. Paul's School. Rev. Joseph 



The Clergy, Continued. 85 

Nussbaum, of Hesse Cassel, gave him lessons in Latin, from 
1876 to September 1878, when he entered St. Lawrence's Col- 
lege, at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, finishing his classical course 
in June 1883. In September, of that year, he came to St. 
Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, where he began and completed 
his philosophical and theological studies. Bishop Heiss or- 
dained him Subdeacon and Deacon, at St. Francis, and on 
June 29, 1887, Bishop Dwenger ordained him priest, in the 
Cathedral at Fort Wayne. He suppHed the place of the pastor 
at St. Paul's, Fort Wayne, for six weeks, was two weeks at 
Chesterton, and eight weeks at Lagro. At the end of October, 
he was appointed pastor at Goshen, with Millersburg and Lig- 
onier as missions, attending also the Elkhart County Poor 
House. Having labored here until July 13, 1889, he was given 
■a vacation. On June 2, 1890, he was made assistant to Rev. 
J. H. Hueser D. D., at Huntington, where he remained until 
July 19, 1895, when he was made pastor at Klaasville, with 
Lowell for a mission. From August to September 1898, he 
was pastor at Grass Creek, with Lucerne for a mission. Bishop 
Rademacher transferred him to Wanatah, on September 8, 
1898, giving him charge also of the missions Schimmels, Walk- 
erton, and Hamlet. On November 21, 1906, Bishop Alerding 
gave him charge of St. John's Church, at St, John, in Lake 
county. 



THE REV. PETER A. BUDNIK. 

He was born July 15, 1876, at Ludom, Archdiocese of 
Posen, Germany. He studied the classics, philosophy and one 
year of theology, in SS. Cyrill and Methodius' Seminary, at 
Detroit, Michigan, and the two last years of theology, in Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, at Cincinnati. He was ordained priest 
by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 
21, 1901. He was the second resident pastor at Walkerton 
and its missions, from July 18, 1901 to June 5, 1902. He was 
pastor of St. Adalbert's Church, at Hammond, from June 5, 
1902 till June 8, 1907. On the latter date he was transferred 
to Otis. 



86 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. ALEXANDER BUECHLER. 

He was bom March 12, 1877, in Ottawa, Illinois, a son of 
Philip and Anna (Moczygamba) Buechler. He received his 
primary schooling at Otis, Indiana. He studied the classics at 
St. Francis, Wisconsin, from 1890 to 1897, philosophy and 
theology in St. John's University, Minnesota, and Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and was ordained priest on July 
3, 1900, in the Josephinum at Columbus, Ohio, by His Emi- 
nence Cardinal Martinelli. His appointments were: Assistant 
at St. Stanislaus' Church, Michigan City; pastor pro tem. of 
Goshen; pastor of Terre Coupee, and its mission Rolling 
Prairie, since May 1, 1901. 



THE REV. MICHAEL J. BYRNE. 

He was born in Hamilton, Ohio, October 18, 1858. He 
studied the classics at Niagara University, philosophy, at St. 
Sulpice's Seminary, Baltimore, theology, at St. Vincent's, 
Pennsylvania, and was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, at 
Fort Wayne, June 29, 1888. His appointments were: residing 
at the Cathedral, he attended Leo and St. Michael's, in Allen 
county, from 1888 till 1889; assistant at the Cathedral, Fort 
Wayne, from 1889 to 1891; pastor ot East Chicago, from Jan- 
uary 26, 1891 till 1893; pastor of Whiting, from 1893 to August 
1898; assistant at the Cathedral, from August 15, 1898 to May 
1, 1899; pastor of Union City, from May 1, 1899 to May 16, 
1901; pastor of St. Ann's Church, Lafayette, since May 16, 
1901. He is a member of the Diocesan Building Committee. 



THE REV. MATTHEW ELEVART CAMPION. 

He was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, November 9, 1844. 
His parents emigrated to this country, and after spending a 
few years in Canada, they settled in Michigan City, arriving 
there on Christmas eve of 1850. He made his classical studies 
at the University of Notre Dame; his theology at St. Francis' 



The Clergy, Continued. 87 

Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 'He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Luers, on January 14, 1868, in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne. His first appointment was that of assistant to Rev. 
B. J. Force at Logansport, from January 24, till April 9, 1868. 
Upon the death of Father Force, he was pastor pro tem. of 
St. Vincent de Paul's Church, until August 9, 1868, attending 
also the missions, Kewanna and Lucerne. From August 9, 
1868 to October 1, 1873, he was pastor of St. Patrick's Church 
at Lagro. From here he attended to Wabash as a station till 
1871. He was transferred to the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, as 
assistant from October 1, 1873 to April 4, 1875, when he was 
appointed pastor of St. Joseph's Church at Delphi, where he 
remained only one month. Upon the death of Rev. George A. 
Hamilton at Lafayette, he succeeded him as pastor of St. 
Mary's Church, on May 9, 1875. On account of ill health he 
resigned this charge and in June 1880, he took charge of St. 
Peter's parish at Laporte. On June 9, 1883, he was transferred 
to the pastorate of St. Vincent de Paul's Church at Logansport. 
Father Campion was the dean of the Logansport district, a 
Diocesan Consul tor and a Synodal Examiner. In 1887, he 
was named irremovable rector and for fourteen years held the 
office of secretary of the Clerical Benevolent Association of the 
diocese. He died at Logansport, on December 18, 1899; his 
remains rest in the cemetery at Logansport. 



THE REV. PETER ANTHONY CAPEDER, C. PP. S. 

He was born in Lumberein, diocese of Chur, Switzerland, 
on January 1, 1817. Having been ordained priest on May 3, 
1843, he emigrated to America in 1844. From 1869 to 1871, 
he was the pastor of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay county. 



THE REV. FRANCIS ANTHONY CARIUS. 

He was born at Altenstadt, diocese of Strassburg, Ger- 
many, on December 31, 1821. He came to America in April 
1845, and was ordained priest by Bishop de la Hailandiere, in 
Vincennes, on March 11, 1846. His name appears on the 



88 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

baptismal records of the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, on April 
12 and June 17, 1846, and May 7, 1847. Up to the year 1851, 
he resided at St. John, Lake county, paying Lottaville monthly 
visits. From 1852 to 1855, he was the pastor of St. Vincent's 
Church, Logansport, attending also to Peru, and visiting the 
Catholics at Monterev every three months, celebrating Mass in 
private houses. He seems to have been the first priest to visit 
the Catholics at Kewanna and Lucerne, as early as 1855. He 
later became a priest of the Leavenworth, Kansas, diocese and 
died the chaplain in the Ursuline Convent at St. Louis. 



THE REV. J. C. CARRIER, C. S. C. 

He was born at Vernes, France, July 14, 1833. He was 
one of the pastors of St. Joseph's Church at South Bend, at- 
tending the same from Notre Dame, prior to 1869. During 
the absence of Father Carroll at New Orleans, some time 
between 1859 and 1864, and for several months after Father 
Carroll's departure, he was the pastor of St. Patrick's Church 
at South Bend. He was probably the first priest to preach to 
the German Catholics at South Bend in their mother tongue, 
while they were still worshipping at St. Patrick's Church. He 
died in Canada, on November 12, 1904. 



THE REV. THOMAS CARROLL, C. S. C. 

He was born in Andagh, Ireland, August 17, 1836; entered 
the Congregation of the Holy Cross, June 30, 1857. He was 
the organizer and first pastor of St. Patrick's Church, at South 
Bend, of which he took charge in 1858. The year following 
he erected a small brick church; but the few Irish families 
making up his parish being too poor to pay for it, he went to 
New Orleans and there collected enough money to pay the 
debt. Throughout his pastorate he resided at Notre Dame. 
In 1864, he went to Oil City, Pennsylvania, where he became 
the pastor of St. Joseph's Church and where he died in 1896. 
The Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes, at Notre Dame, owes its 
existence to Father Carroll. 



The Clergy, Continued. 89 

THE REV. JOHN B. CHASSE. 

He was born at Rennes, in the Province of Brittany, 
France, on January 6, 1816. Having emigrated to this country, 
he was ordained priest, by Bishop de la Hailandiere, on Decem- 
ber 19, 1840. His name appears on the baptismal records of 
the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on October 10, 1842. He died 
September 1, 1879, chaplain at St. Mary-of-the-Woods, where 
he is buried. 



r THE REV. JOHN W. CLARK, C. S. C. 

He was born in Ireland, November 1, 1843, was ordained 
priest June 29, 1866. After spending a number of years as 
missionary, in California and Nevada, he joined the Congrega- 
tion of the Holy Cross, after which he taught the classics in 
St. Lawrence's College, Canada. He was transferred to the 
American Province, and in 1893, was appointed pastor of St. 
Patrick's Church, South Bend, in which capacity he continued 
until the time of his death, March 16, 1899. 



THE REV. MICHAEL J. CLARK. 

He was ordained priest, February 28, 1841, by Bishop 
de la Hailandiere. His name appears on the baptismal records 
of the Cathedral at Fort Wayne on August 13, 1841, June 1st, 
and July 1842. He adds to his signature "Pastore absente." 
For a time in 1842, he was the resident pastor of Peru. In 
1843, he was made the first resident pastor at Lafayette, his 
parish extending over Tippecanoe, Fountain, Warren, Madison, 
Montgomery, Putnam, Benton, Carroll and White counties. 
He remained at Lafayette until 1857. He died at Bloomington, 
Illinois, pastor of a congregation at that place. 



THE REV. FRANCIS LOUIS COINTET, C. S. C. 

He was born at La Roe, France, February 26, 1816; re- 
ceived the habit, August 19, 1843; professed, September 5, 



90 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1846. He attended St. John, from April 1850 till January 1, 
1851. From January 1853 to October 1854, he visited Mich- 
igan City. He died September 19, 1854, and is buried at 
Notre Dame. 



THE REV. JAMES F. CONNELLY. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, on May 24, 1878. 
He studied the classics at St. Joseph's College, near Rensse- 
laer. He made his philosophical and theological course at 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He was ordained 
priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, on 
May 24, 1902. His first appointment was that of assistant at 
St. Bridget's Church, Logansport, until July 1, 1905, when he 
was made pastor of Lebanon and its missions. 



THE REV. THOMAS M. CONROY. 

He was born at Richmond, Indiana, on March 8, 1877. 
He made his classical studies in St. Joseph's College, near 
Rensselaer. He studied philosophy and theology in Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, at Cincinnati. He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 21, 
1901. His appointments were: Pastor of Portland and Mis- 
sions July 1, 1901 -June 1, 1902; assistant at Anderson from 
June 8, 1902; pastor at Monroeville since August 21, 1904. 



THE REV. PETER P. COONEY, C. S. C. 

He was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1822 
and was educated at Notre Dame University, and at St. Mary's 
Seminary, Baltimore. Having been ordained priest, in July 
1859, he was appointed Vice-president of St. Mary's of the 
Lake, Chicago, Illinois. On October 4, 1861, he received his 
commission of chaplain to the 35th regiment, Indiana Volun- 
teers. At the close of the war, he came to St. Patrick's Church 
at South Bend, and continued as its pastor, until March 12, 



The Clergy, Continued. 91 

1871. After this he gave missions in various parts of the 
country. He died at Notre Dame, May 7, 1905. 



THE RF,V. WILLIAM CORBY, C. S. C. 

He was born at Detroit, Michigan, October 2, 1833; re- 
ceived the habit, September 9, 1857; profession, September 10, 
1858; ordained priest December 25, 1860, by Bishop Luers. 
He was one of the pastors of St. Joseph's Church, at South 
Bend, attending the same from Notre Dame, prior to 1869. 
In the beginning of 1865, he had charge of St. Patrick's Church, 
at South Bend, for three or four months. He died December 
28, 1897, and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. JOHN A. CORCORAN. 

He visited Peru during the summer of 1835. He died in 
Peru and was buried on the north banks of the Wabash river, 
between the river and the canal; later his remains were re- 
moved to the Reyburn cemetery, at the instance of William 
B. McGregor, the first white resident on the present site of 
Peru; and later still, in 1887, fifty-two years after his death, 
was reinterred, in St. Charles' Cemetery, on the lot of Michael 
Cannon. 



THE REV. JOHN B. CRAWLEY. 

He was born in 1828 and ordained priest in 1864. He 
was the pastor at Anderson, from 1866 till August 1884; pastor 
of St. Peter's Church, Laporte, from the fall of 1884 till Decem- 
ber 19, 1893, the date of his death. His remains rest in the 
cemetery at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. PATRICK J. CRAWLEY. 

He was born in Castlerea, County Roscommon, Ireland, 
on December 19, 1869. He studied the classics in his native 



92 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

place, came to America and entered Notre Dame University, 
in November, 1890, Mount St. Mary's Seminary in September 
1894, and was ordained priest by Bishop Rademacher, in Fort 
Wayne, on June 24, 1897. He was assistant priest at St. 
Patrick's Church, Fort Wayne, until June 1, 1899; pastor at 
Lebanon from June 1, 1899 till June 30, 1905; assistant at 
Marion, from July 1, 1905 till April 14, 1906, since which time 
he has been the pastor of Marion. 



THE REV. PATRICK JOSEPH CROSSON. 

He was born in Carregallen, Ireland, on December 1, 1852. 
He received his elementary education in his native town. His 
classical course was made from 1868 to 1873 in private school, 
and in St. Mary's Seminary at Moyne, County Longford. In 
September, 1873, he entered the Missionary College of All 
Hallows, in Dublin, where he completed his course of phi- 
losophy. Having been admitted to the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
he emigrated to the United States in August, 1875, and in 
September, of the same year, he began the study of theology 
in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and completed the 
same in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee. He was ordained 
priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, 
on April 25, 1878. He was the assistant at St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, during five months, after which he was pastor at 
Lebanon for two and a half months, and in November of the 
same year, was appointed pastor of St. Anne's Church, in 
Fulton county, better known as Grass Creek. From August 
15, 1880 till December 31, 1881, he was again assistant at St. 
Mary's Church, at Lafayette. On January 1, 1882 till June, 
1882, he was given charge of Fowler and St. Bridget's, in 
Benton county (Barrydale), and six months later took up his 
residence at Oxford, with St. Bridget's for a mission. From 
September 1894 till Ascension day 1898, he was pastor of St. 
Bernard's Church, at Crawfordsville. He was pastor at 
Wabash, from 1898 till February 1, 1900, when he was made 
irremovable rector of St. Vincent de Paul's Church at Logans- 
port, and where he remains at the present time. 



The Clergy, Continued. 93 

THE REV. VALENTINE CZYZEWSKI, C. S. C. 

He was born February 14, 1846, in the village of Talkuny, 
in the parish of Miroslaw, Russian Poland, He emigrated to 
America in April 1869, and in 1872 entered the Congregation 
of the Holy Cross. He was ordained priest on December 28, 
1876, and was appointed pastor of St. Hedwig's Church, at 
South Bend, on January 1, 1877, which position he continues 
to hold at the present time. He was the first resident Polish 
pastor at South Bend, and Terre Coupee and Rolling Prairie, 
at the time, were missions attended from St. Hedwig's. Father 
Czyzewski also organized St. Casimir's and St. Stanislaus' 
Parishes. 



k 



THE REV. FREDERICK J. DANDURAND. 



He was born at Kankakee, Illinois, on April 30, 1870. 
He studied at St. Viateur's College, Bourbonnais, Illinois. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Rademacher at Fort Wayne, 
on June 28, 1895. He was assistant at St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, from July 1895 till February 27, 1897. He was 
assistant at St. Patrick's Church, at Fort Wayne, from Feb- 
ruary 27, 1897 till July 15, of the same year. He was assistant 
at the Cathedral, from July 15, 1897 till September 1898. He 
was pastor of Auburn, from September 1898 till July 23, 1900. 
He was pastor of Monroeville, from August 23, 1900 till August 
1904. He was compelled to resign on account of sickness, and 
died at his native town, in Illinois, on February 26, 1905. 



THE REV. SAMUEL DAUGHERTY, C. S. C. 

He was born at Glasgow, Scotland, May 31, 1839; received 
the habit, being a priest, on August 7, 1865. He was one of 
the pastors of St. Joseph's Church at South Bend, attending 
the same from Notre Dame, prior to 1869. 



THE REV. JOHN F. DeGROOTE, C. S. C. 

He was born in Mishawaka, Indiana, August 27, 1866. 
At the age of fourteen he entered the University of Notre 



94 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Dame, and five years later joined the Congregation of the Holy 
Cross. For two years, previous to his ordination, he was 
director of St. Joseph's Hall, Notre Dame. He was ordained 
priest by Bishop Rademacher, at Notre Dame, on July 21, 
1893. The offices he filled successively were: Prefect of dis- 
cipline and teacher in St. Edward's College, Austin, Texas, 
and in Holy Cross, New Orleans, and assistant priest at the 
Sacred Heart Church, New Orleans, for two years until March 
29, 1899, when he was appointed pastor of St. Patrick's Church 
at South Bend, which appointment continues to the present 
time. 



THE REV. FRANCIS X. DEIMEL. 

He was born at Brilon, diocese of Paderborn, on Novem- 
ber 25, 1846. Having emigrated to America in June 1868, he 
was ordained priest, on December 20, 1869 at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. In 1873, he transferred to the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
taking charge of Hanover Centre, from June 25th, of the same 
year till August 10, 1877. From here he also attended Klaas- 
ville as a mission. He was pastor of Schererville, from August 
1877 to May 1881. His health failing him, he left for St. 
Louis. He died in the Alexian Hospital, at St. Louis, on Novem- 
ber 11, 1881. His remains were brought to Schererville for 
burial. 



THE REV. FRANCIS DEIPENBROCK. 

He was a native of Westphalia, Germany, born on October 
25, 1825. When still a youth, he came to America. Having 
finished his theological studies at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, 
at Cincinnati, he was ordained priest. He was the second 
resident pastor of Avilla, having charge from 1862 to 1863. 
He died in Ottawa on September 4, 1868. He attended Ege 
as a mission from Avilla. 



THE REV. JOSEPH F. DELANEY. 

He was born on January 15, 1860, at Thompsonville, 
Connecticut. He was one of six children born to John and 



The Clergy, Continued, 95 

Mary Delaney. His father was a native of Roscrea, County 
Tipperary, and his mother, of the parish of Den, County Cavin, 
Ireland. His classical and philosophical courses were made at 
the Niagara University, after which he entered St. Francis' 
Seminary, Milwaukee. His health breaking down after one 
year, he was sent to St. Vincent's Seminary, Latrobe, Penn- 
sylvania, where he completed his theology. He was ordained 
priest, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, by Bishop Dwenger, 
on June 29, 1887. On July 17th, he received his appointment 
as an assistant to Very Rev. J. H. Brammer, V. G., at the 
Cathedral, until two years later he succeeded the Rev. T. M. 
O'Leary, as pastor of St. Patrick's Church at Fort Wayne. 
He was named irremovable rector by Bishop Alerding and is 
a Diocesan Consultor. 



THE REV. WILLIAM DEMERS, C. S. C 

He was born at St. Nicholas, Canada East, January 10, 
1820; received the habit in 1862; profession, August 25, 1865; 
ordained priest in 1865. He was made the second resident 
pastor of St. Joseph's Church at South Bend, in the fall of 
1870 up to December 26, 1872; pastor of St. Vincent, Allen 
county, in 1873; pastor of St. Louis' Church, Besancon, in 
1875; pastor of St. Joseph's Church, South Bend, from Sep- 
tember 1876 to September 1877. He died on December 22, 
1896 and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. JOHN DEMPSEY. 

He was born in Croagh, diocese of Limerick, Ireland, on 
March 21, 1845. He studied the classics in Limerick and 
philosophy and theology in St. John's College, Waterford, 
Ireland. Having emigrated to this country, he was ordained 
priest in Fort Wayne, by Bishop Dwenger, on July 18, 1873. 
His appointments were: Pastor of Grass Creek and Lucerne, 
from August 1873 till January 1877; pastor of Fowler and St. 
Bridget's (Barrydale), from April 19, 1878 till January 1, 1882; 
pastor of Lebanon, from 1882 till September 1884; pastor of 
St. Ann's Church, Lafayette, from September 1884 till August 
1888; pastor of Valparaiso, from August 1888 till May 1898; 



96 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

pastor of Crawfordsville, from May 1898 till April 4, 1906, on 
which date he dropped dead at the altar of St. Bernard's 
Church, in Crawfordsville. 



THE REV. RUDOLPH J. DENK. 

He was born in Germany, March 10, 1866, to Francis and 
Mary (Neumeier) Denk; he spent six years at Landshut, 
Germany, and four years at St. Vincent, Pennsylvania, in the 
study of the classics and philosophy; three years at Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, at Cincinnati, Ohio, in the study of theol- 
ogy, and was ordained priest, by Archbishop Elder, on June 
14, 1891. He was the pastor of Kewanna and the mission, 
Lucerne, from June till the fall of 1891; resident pastor of 
Auburn, from November 1891 for eight months; assistant at 
St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, from 1892 till May 1896, 
when he was appointed the second resident pastor of Sheldon, 
with Bluffton for a mission. He died as pastor of St. Aloysius' 
Church, at Sheldon, in St. Joseph's Hospital, Fort Wayne, on 
January 5, 1901, and was buried in the cemetery at Sheldon. 



THE REV. MARTIN L. DENTINGER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Buffalo, New York, May 17, 1856; or- 
dained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 30, 1885. He attended 
Portland as a mission on two Sundays of every month, from 
November 1885 to March 1888. He was the pastor of Pulaski 
from 1901 till October 1903. 



THE REV. FRANCIS DESCHAMP. 

He was the pastor of St. Vincent, Allen county, from 
1856 to August 19, 1858, the date of his death. From here 
he also attended Ege as a station. His remains rest beneath 
the sanctuary of St. Vincent's Church. 



THE REV. CHARLES DHE. 

He was born May 6, 1863, at Nermelles, Diocese of Arras, 
France. He made all his studies at Arras. He was ordained 



The Clergy, Continued. 97 

priest by Bishop Dennel of Arras, on July 10, 1887. His first 
appointment was at St. Pol sur Vernoise, diocese of Arras. He 
was next at New Iberia, Louisiana, Archdiocese of New Orleans. 
He came to the diocese of Fort Wayne, in February 1894, and 
was appointed pastor of Hartford City, with Montpelier for a 
mission. He had charge also of Dunkirk as a mission until 
March 1900. He was appointed pastor of St. Louis' Church, 
at Besancon, on July 11, 1906. 



THE REV. ANTHONY DICK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at St. Stephen, Ohio, January 1, 1852; or- 
dained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 11, 1881. He was the 
pastor of St. Augustine's Church, Rensselaer, from October 
1888 till July 1891; pastor of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay 
county, from 1898 till 1901 ; pastor of Pulaski, from November 
24, 1903 till September 30, 1905. 



THE REV. BERNARD DICKMANN, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Minster, Ohio, October 3, 1839; ordained 
priest at Minster, August 17, 1862. He was appointed pastor 
of St. Augustine's Church, Rensselaer, in February 1897, but 
on account of ill health he had to go South for a change of 
climate. 



THE REV. JOHN R. DINNEN. 

He was born in Shelburne, Vermont, on June 19, 1843. 
In 1857 the family removed to Chicago, Illinois, where he 
attended the Kinsey School and Sloane's Commercial College. 
In 1861 he entered the University of Notre Dame, and became 
assistant professor in book-keeping and penmanship, and one 
year later, was made secretary of the University. He remained 
at the University until 1868, when Bishop Duggan of Chicago, 
sent him to St. Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, to complete his 
course in theology. Bishop Luers adopted him for the diocese 
of Fort Wayne, and he was ordained priest by Bishop Luers, 
in St. Patrick's Church, Chicago, on July 22, 1869. On August 
18th, of the same year, he was made assistant to Rev. George 



98 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

A. Hamilton, pastor of St. Mary's Church, Lafayette. In April 
1870, he received the appointment of pastor of Oxford and all 
the missions in Benton, Boone and part of White counties. 
From October 18, 1875 till May 18, 1878, he was assistant in 
the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne. He was pastor of St. Ber- 
nard's Church at Crawfordsville for more than sixteen years. 
Here he celebrated his Silver Sacerdotal Jubilee, in July 1894. 
On August 4, 1894, he was named irremovable rector of St. 
Mary's Church, at Lafayette, by Bishop Rademacher. Father 
Dinnen is a Diocesan Consultor, dean of the Lafayette district, 
and a member of the Diocesan School Board. 



THE REV. ROBERT STEPHEN AMBROSE DOWD, C.PP.S. 

He was born at Clooncraif, County Roscommon, Parish 
Aughrim, Ireland, September 11, 1870; entered the Congre- 
gation of the Most Precious Blood, August 20, 1891, at Rhoner- 
ville, California; ordained priest at Carthagena, Ohio, June 23, 
1904, by Archbishop Moeller. Pastor of St. Vincent's Church, 
St. Vincent, Allen county, since January 1, 1907. 



THE REV. WILLIAM DOYLE. 

He was born twelve miles south of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, on August 31, 1820. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Bazin, on December 18, 1847. He attended Peru and Kokomo 
in 1851 and 1852. He was pastor of St. Vincent de Paul's 
Church, at Logansport, from 1855 to 1857, visiting the missions 
Pulaski and Indian Creek, and the stations now termed Ke- 
wanna and Lucerne. He attended Delphi while a station, about 
the year 1861. He died in St. Vincent's Infirmary, at Indian- 
apolis, on August 7, 1883. 



THE REV. DOMINIC DUEHMIG. 

He was born November 9, 1842, in Ebenheid, Baden, 
Germany. He was the eleventh of a family of twelve children. 
He attended the schools of his native village until 1854. His 
classical studies were made at Wertheim, on the Main, in July 
1862. Two years of his theological studies were made at the 



I The Clergy, Continued. 99 

University of Freiburg and two years more at the University 
of Louvain. He was ordained priest by the Bishop of Liege, 
Belgium on August 5, 1866. He left his native country on 
December 6, and arrived in New York on the 22nd, of the 
same month, reaching Fort Wayne on the 24th, in 1866. His 
first appointment was at Huntington for a short time only. 
He was made assistant priest at Avilla, on February 22, 1867 
and was duly installed as pastor of Avilla, on May 12th, of the 
same year. The places which he attended, as missions of 
Avilla, were Kendallville, Ligonier, Millersburg, Waterloo, 
Summit, Ege, Albion, Bremen, Auburn, Angola, Lagrange, 
Goshen, Leo, Rome City and Butler. Father Duehmig's life 
was full of hardships and personal sacrifices. Travelling from 
place to place, sleeping in log houses, celebrating Mass in rail- 
road shanties and humble cabin homes, preaching in court 
houses and public halls, dispelling prejudice and sowing the 
good seed, he certainly was a pioneer priest, worthy of the 
highest love and esteem. As far as known. Father Duehmig 
offered the first Mass ever said in Lagrange county, in the 
little log house, the home of Patrick Foley, in 1871. In Steuben 
county, he was want to celebrate Mass repeatedly, in the little 
railroad shanty belonging to Eugene Moriarity, as far back as 
1869. Father Duehmig, after an illness of a year or more, 
departed this life in the Kneipp Sanitarium at Rome City, on 
June 3, 1905. His life and labors will be ever held in grateful 
remembrance. His remains rest just back of the Mortuary 
Chapel in the Cemetery of Avilla, the statue of the Sacred 
Heart looking down upon his grave. 



THE REV. JAMES H. DURHAM. 

He was born at Middletown, New York, on November 26, 
1874. He made his classical studies at St. Benedict's College, 
Atchison, Kansas. His philosophical and theological course 
was begun and completed at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cedar Point, Ohio. He received tonsure on June 14, 1904; 
Minor Orders on June 21, 1906; Subdeaconship on March 15th, 
and Deaconship on March 16, 1907, all at the Seminary. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at 



100 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Fort Wayne, on May 22, 1907. His first appointment was 
that of assistant at St. Patrick's Church, Fort Wayne, on 
June 8, 1907. 



THE REV. JOHN P. DURHAM. 

He was born at Middletown, New York, on September 22, 
1867. He made his studies at St. Benedict's College, Atchison, 
Kansas, at the Seminary of Our Lady of the Angels, at Niagara, 
and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, at Cincinnati. He was or- 
dained priest at Cincinnati, by Archbishop Elder, on June 17, 
1897. He was assistant at the Cathedral of Fort Wayne, from 
June 17, 1897 until March 7, 1901. He was pastor of St. 
Mary's Church, at Huntington until May 16, 1901, when he 
received his present appointment, that of pastor of St. Mary's 
Church, Union City. 



THE REV. LAWRENCE A. EBERLE. 

He was born at Peru, Indiana, on March 13, 1875. He 
studied the classics at St. Viateur's College, Kankakee, Illinois, 
and at St. Joseph's College, near Rensselaer, Indiana. He made 
his philosophical and theological studies at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 24, 1902. 
His appointments were: Assistant at St. Joseph's Church, 
Mishawaka; assistant at Decatur, from July 1904, with Port- 
land for a mission; pastor of Portland and Geneva, since July 
3, 1905. 



THE REV. FRANCIS X. EGE. 

He was born in Wolpertswende, diocese of Rottenburg, 
Germany, on January 6, 1849. He made his classical studies 
with the Jesuits in Feldkirch, of his native country. His phil- 
osophical and theological studies were had in St, Francis' 
Seminary, Wisconsin. He was ordained priest by Bishop 



The Clergy, Continued. lOl 

Dwenger, at Fort Wayne, on June 10, '1876. His appointments 
were: Pastor of St. Anthony's, Benton county, from June 
1876 to October 1878; pastor at Ege, from October 1878 to 
November 1897; on account of sickness, he had no charge for 
a year; pastor of Klaasville, since August 13, 1898. 



THE REV. JOS. A. THOMAS EISENRING, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Mosmang, St. Gall, Switzerland, on Novem- 
ber 1, 1844. He attended the parochial school at Kirchberg 
and St. George's College near St. Gallen. Having emigrated 
to America, he aflfiliated himself with the Fathers of the Most 
Precious Blood, with whom he made his theological studies. 
He was ordained priest by Archbishop Purcell, on August 15, 
1873. Having had charge of the parishes of Celina and of 
New Riegel, both in Ohio, until 1878, he was sent to Europe, 
where he remained four vears in charge of the parish and the 
convent of the Sisters in Schellenberg. He was recalled to 
America and was given charge of the parishes, at Coldwater 
and Philothea, Ohio. In the year 1883, he labored at Wina- 
mac, diocese of Fort Wayne, attending also Schimmels, North 
Judson, Jeflferson and Royal Centre. Having held many re- 
sponsible positions and having been instrumental in the erec- 
tion of several churches, he finally became chaplain of the St. 
Joseph's Hospital at Fort Wayne, conducted by the Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ, on Decem.ber 3, 1889. In connec- 
tion with the hospital work, the Poor Handmaids have here 
their Provincial Mother-house, of which Father Thomas, as he 
is familiarly known, is the spiritual director. 



THE RE\'. ANTHONY M. FLEERING. 

He was born in Eppe, Westphalia, Germany, March 18, 
1853. He was the oldest of seven children born to Gerhard 
and Mary Ann (Esseling) Ellering. The family emigrated to 
the United States, in September 1868, and settled in Stearns 
county, Minnesota, where his parents died, his mother in 1884, 
and his father in 1885. He received his elemientarv education 



102 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

in his native city. From 1874 to 1878, he attended the Bene- 
dictine University at Collegeville, Minnesota, for his classical 
course. His studies in philosophy were made in Calvary Col- 
lege, Wisconsin, from 1878 to 1880, and his theological studies 
in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee. He was ordained priest 
by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 
11, 1884. His first appointment was that of assistant to Rev. 
Julius Becks, at Michigan City, who at the time was in feeble 
health. He was made pastor of Warsaw and of the missions 
Pierceton and Bourbon until May 1, 1886, when he received 
his present appointment, pastor of St. Paul of the Cross Church 
at Columbia City, and of the Sacred Heart Church at Warsaw, 
as a mission. 



THE REV. EDWARD M. FALLER. 

He was born January 3, 1824, in Barr, Province of Alsace. 
In his sixteenth year, he emigrated to the United States, land- 
ing in New Orleans, on April 1 1, 1840. He was ordained priest, 
on July 5, 1846, by Bishop de la Hailandiere of Vincennes. 
He first had charge of Lanesville, Indiana, but on October 12th, 
of the same year, he was transferred to Fort Wayne, and for 
two years was assistant priest to Father Benoit at St. Augus- 
tine's Church. He organized St. Mary's Congregation at Fort 
Wayne in 1848, and from here also attended Avilla and .its 
neighboring missions. While at Fort Wayne, he also attended 
to Decatur, as early as 1846, and Indian Creek, in 1851. When 
the diocese of Fort Wayne was established, in 1857, he re- 
turned to the diocese of Vincennes, being made the pastor of 
St. Mary's Church at New Albany. On July 5, 1906, he had 
been priest sixty years, the occasion was duly commemorated. 
He is still living and in active service. 



THE REV. MICHAEL PHILIP FALLIZE, C. S. C. 

He was born at Harlingen, Luxemburg, February 24, 
1855; came to America September 2, 1874; ordained priest 
December 31, 1878; pastor of St. Joseph's Church, South 
Bend, from August 15, 1880 till the fall of 1888. He was the 



The Clergy, Continued. 103 

president of the State Total Abstinence Union. Upon his 
departure from South Bend, he was chosen the Proto-Vicarius- 
Notarius of the missionary band, which was then sent to East 
Bengal, India, and he is still working there, as the Vicar Gen- 
eral of the diocese of Dacca. 



THE REV. GREGORY FANGMANN, O. F. M. 

He was born July 16, 1846; entered the Order, September 
17, 1863; ordained priest. May 22, 1869; assistant at St. 
Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from September 1870 to August 
1872. 



THE REV. FRANCIS P. FAUST. 

He is the son of Francis and Catherine (Schulz) Faust, 
born in Fort Wayne, on February 19, 1868. He studied the 
classics at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, philosophy and theology 
at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and was 
ordained priest, by Archbishop Elder, in Cincinnati, on June 
22, 1892. His appointments were: Pastor of Auburn and 
Albion, from July 1892 to December 1895; assistant at SS. 
Peter and Paul's Church, Huntington, from December 1895 to 
November 1897; pastor at Ege, since November 1897. 



THE REV. NORBERT FELDEN. 

He was born at Marytown, Fond du Lac county, Wis- 
consin, on the 9th day of April, 1880. When about a year old 
his parents moved to St. Francis, Wisconsin, where is located, 
St. Francis' Seminary, the Alma Mater of 1600 priests. Here 
the young Felden imbibed the spirit of the priesthood. He 
remained at this institution until 1901 when, for climatic 
reasons, he went to St. Meinrad's Seminary in Spencer county, 
Indiana. Here he completed his theological course in 1905. 
On the 17th of June, he was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, 
in the Cathedral of Fort Wayne. He was at once assigned to 
St. Peter's Church, at Fort Wayne, as the assistant. 



104 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

THE REV. AGNELLUS FISCHER, O. F. M. 

He was born January 13, 1848; entered the Order, August 
12, 1866; ordained priest, September 8, 1870; came to America 
in October, 1875; was pastor at St. Boniface's Church, Lafay- 
ette, from January 1878 to August 1882; returned to Europe 
in 1882. 



THE REV. JAMES B. FITZPATRICK. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, on September 17, 
1876. He studied the classics in St. Joseph's College, near 
Rensselaer, philosophy and theology in Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 21, 
1901. He was made assistant at the Cathedral and remained 
until February 1903, when he was appointed pastor of St. 
John's Church at Goshen. 



THE REV. JOSEPH FLACH. 

He was born in Haslach, Baden, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, on June 9, 1850. He studied the classics in Con- 
stance, Baden, philosophy and theology in Freiburg, and St. 
Peter's, in the same diocese. He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Lothar von Kuebbel, in St. Peter's Seminary, on July 
25, 1876. After his ordination he came to Fort Wayne and 
was the chaplain of the Sisters of St. Francis at Avilla, from 
October 1876 until the spring of 1878. He was pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, at Dyer, from March 5, 1878 to August 3, 
1883, when the Archbishop of Freiburg recalled him. But he 
returned to Fort Wayne the following year and spent a short 
time at St. Anthony's, in Benton county, assistant at Michigan 
City, and at Hanover Centre, Lake county, when he was ap- 
pointed pastor of Lottaville (Turkey Creek), and Hobart, until 
July 29, 1888. Since that time he has been the pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, at Dyer. 



I 



The Clergy, Continued. 105 

THE REV. GEORGE FLEISCH. C. PP. S. 

He was born at Goetzis, Vorarlberg, Brixen, November 1, 
1846; came to America, November 30, 1868; ordained priest 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 30, 1874. He was pastor of Holy 
Trinity Church, in Jay county, from 1876 till 1877, and again, 
from 1892 till 1898. He attended Portland regularly on two 
Sundays of every month, from 1876 till January 1878. He 
was the first resident pastor of Monterey, from September 
1880 till January 1886. He visited North Judson in 1881. 



THE REV. JOHN FLYNN. 

He was the first resident pastor of Chesterton, from Sep- 
tember 1868 till August 1, 1870, when he died at the age of 
twenty-eight years. His remains rest in the parish cemetery 
at Chesterton. 



THE REV. THOMAS FLYNN, C. S. C. 

He was born at Limerick, Ireland, in 1825; received the 
habit, November 21st, 1852; profession, August 15th, 1853. 
He attended Michigan City, from March 1855 to December 
1856. He died, September 23, 1886, and is buried at Notre 
Dame. 



THE REV. BERNARD JOSEPH FORCE. 

He was born at Vertle, Germany, March 17, 1828; received 
the habit of the Congregation of the Floly Cross, July 13, 1849; 
profession, August 15, 1850; ordained priest by Bishop Van 
de Velde, on December 11, 1850, in the Church of the Holy 
Name, Chicago, Illinois. He attended St. John, from the be- 
ginning of 1851 till the beginning of 1857. He was the resi- 
dent pastor at Laporte succeeding Father Wallace. His name 
appears on the church records at Michigan City, from January 
1853 to October 1854. He was the first resident pastor at 
Peru, from April 15, 1860 till 1864, visiting Kokomo and 



106 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Tipton. He was pastor of St. Vincent's Church, Logansport, 
from January 1864 till April 13, 1868, when he died at the age 
of forty years. While pastor at Logansport, he attended the 
missions Kewanna and Lucerne and, from 1864 to 1866, the 
missions Pulaski and Indian Creek. His remains rest in the 
cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



) 



THE REV. JOHN HERMAN FORCE. 

He was the pastor of St. Paul's Church, at Valparaiso, 
when he died, April 4, 1859, at the age of thirty-eight years 
and four months. From 1858 to 1859 he also attended Hobart 
as a mission. His remains rest in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. MICHAEL J. FORD. 

The son of Thomas and Catherine (Delehanty) Ford, 
native of County Clare, Ireland, was born in Dayton, Ohio, 
February 9, 1871. In the winter of 1873, the family, con- 
sisting of five sons and three daughters, settled on a farm in 
Wells county, Indiana. He received his education at the home 
school and the Indiana Normal School, at Valparaiso, after 
which he taught a school in Wells county for two terms, and 
then entered the State Normal School, at Terre Haute, where 
he remained two years. He was a parishoner of St. John's 
Church, Montpelier, Indiana, a mission attended from Muncie. 
In September 1893, he entered St. Viateur's College, Bourbon- 
nais, Illinois, where he made his classical and philosophical 
studies. In 1896, he visited England, Ireland, France, Bel- 
gium and Spain. In the fall of 1897, he entered Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, where he completed his 
course in theology. He was ordained priest by his Excellency, 
the Most Rev. S. Martinelli, Apostolic Delegate, in the Joseph- 
inum at Columbus, Ohio, on July 3, 1900. His first appoint- 
ment was that of assistant to Rev. B. Kroeger, pastor of St. 
Bridget's Church, Logansport, where he remained for two 
years. On May 24, 1902, he was appointed pastor of St. Ann's 
Church, near Grass Creek and of Lucerne, a mission. On Sep- 



The Clergy, Continued. 107 

tember 1, 1904, he was appointed assistant priest at Anderson, 
with his residence at St. John's Hospital. He remained there 
till January 18, 1906, when he took charge of St. Bridget's 
Church, Barrydale, and the mission, Otterbein. 



THE REV. PETER J. FRANCISCUS, C. S. C. 

He was born at Luxemburg, January 26, 1850; received 
the habit, June 21, 1873; profession, August 15, 1874; ordained 
priest, October 28, 1876. . He was the pastor at St. Vincent, 
Allen county, in the year 1888. At present he is pastor of 
Sacred Heart Church at New Orleans. 



r 



THE REV. JOHN CLAUDIUS FRANCOIS. 

His name appears on the baptismal records of the Cathe- 
dral at Fort Wayne, in January, February, May, June, July 
and August, 1836 and again in June 1839. He was pastor of 
St. Vincent de Paul's Church at Logansport, from 1838 to 1841, 
also attending Lafayette, about the year 1840. He died at 
Lafourche, Louisiana, July 20, 1849. 



THE REV. PETER FRANZEN. 

He was the first resident pastor of St. Martin's Church at 
Schimmels, from October 1878 to April 1881. He was pastor 
of St. Francis Xavier's Church, at Waterloo when he died, on 
May 11, 1883, at the age of thirty-six years and five months. 
His remains rest in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. JULIUS FRERE, C. S. C. 

He was born at St. Germain, France, September 5. 1820; 
received the habit, August 24, 1860; profession, in 1866. He 
was the first resident pastor of St. Joseph's Church at South 
Bend, from July 1, 1869 till the fall of 1870; pastor at St. 
Vincent, Allen county, from 1870 to 1873. He died May 2, 
1892 and is buried at Notre Dame, 



108 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOHN FRERICKS, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Elbergen, diocese of Osnabrueck, Ge - 
many, September 20, 1838; came to America, August 24, 1866; 
ordained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 24, 1876. He was 
pastor of Pulaski in 1877 and again, from 1881 until 1889. 
From here he attended Schimmels, from December 1881 to 
April 1885 and also visited North Judson. 



THE REV. ERHARD FRITZ, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Buehlerthal, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, January 4, 1851; came to America, September 8, 
1873; ordained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 30, 1885. He 
was the resident pastor at Monterey, from January 1886 till 
July 1888. He was pastor of Pulaski, from 1897 till June 
1901. 



THE REV. FREDERICK FUCHS. 

He was a native of Munster, Westpha ia, Germany. He 
came to Huntington from Cincinnati, Ohio. He was pastor 
of SS. Peter and Paul's Church, at Huntington for five years. 
Owing to ill health he was transferred to Klaasville, where he 
died on October 1863, at the age of thirty eight years. His 
remains rest in the cemetery at Klaasville. 



THE REV. SEBASTIAN GANTHER, C PP. S. 

He was born at Unter-Muensterthal, diocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, August 20, 1821; came to this country. May 12, 
1847; ordained priest at Peru, Ohio, June 5, 1849. He was 
pastor of St. Mary's Church, Decatur, from June 1857 till 
May 1858. 



I 



THE REV. CHARLES A. GANZER. 

He was born October 29, 1857, in St. Mary's, Elk county, 
Pennsylvania, in the diocese of Erie. He made all his studies 
at St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, and was ordained priest 
by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on April 



The Clergy, Continued. 109 

19, 1881. He was assistant at St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, 
for eight months. He was pastor of Klaasville and Lowell, 
from January 1, 1882 till April 27, 1891. He was pastor of 
St. Joseph's Church, Kentland, from September 1'891 to the 
day of his death, which occurred on December 10, 1902. 



THE REV WILLIAM GAUSEPOHL, O. F. M. 

He was born September 11, 1840; entered the Order, 
October 4, 1860; ordained priest, September 10, 1864; assist- 
ant at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from January 1866 
to April 1867. 



THE REV. AUGUST WILLIAM GEERS. 

He was born at Chur, on February 25, 1853. He came to 
this country, on August 10, 1870 and was ordained priest at 
Fort Wayne, on April 1, 1876. He was the first resident 
pastor of Ege from 1876. He next had charge of Hesse Cassel 
in 1877, remaining until August, when he received the appoint- 
ment of assistant at SS. Peter and Paul's Church, Huntington. 
In February 1879, he transferred to the diocese of Marquette, 
Michigan. 



THE REV. SAMUEL GELTING O. F. M. 

He was born October 13, 1863; entered the Order, August 
30, 1885; ordained priest, December 17, 1892; assistant in 
Lafayette from August 1, 1898 to May 1901, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



THE REV. WOLFGANG N. GIEDL. 

I He was the first resident pastor of St. John the Baptist's 

I Church at New Haven. He died May 23, 1873, at the age of 

thirty-five. His remains rest in the cemetery at New Haven. 



110 The Diocese of Fort JVayne. 

THE REV. ANDREW GIETL, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Pessenburkheim, diocese of Augsburg, 
Germany, March 10, 1854; came to America, September 1872; 
ordained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 19, 1879. He, as 
the superior of the Indian School, near St. Joseph's College, 
Collegeville, personally attended Wheatfield, from June to 
September 1898, and since August 1905, Wheatfield has been 
attended by the Fathers C. PP. S., residing at the Indian 
School. 



THE REV. PAUL GILLEN, C. S. C. 

He was born in Ireland in 1808; received the habit, Decem- 
ber 1856; profession, July 2, 1857. He was the first resident 
pastor at Michigan City, attending it as a mission as early as 
1854. He also attended Chesterton, Walkerton and Hobart. 
He died October 20, 1882 and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. LUCAS GOTTBEHOEDE, O. F. M. 

He was born January 23, 1837; entered the Order, Octo- 
ber 4, 1860; ordained priest, November 7, 1862; pastor in 
Lafayette, from July 1897 to September 1900, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



THE REV. FELIX GRAF, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Hazberg, Archdiocese of Munich, Germany, 
May 26, 1842; came to America, October 15, 1867; ordained 
priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, January 21, 1876. He was the 
pastor of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay county, from 1877 till 
1878. 



THE REV. JOHN GROGAN. 

He was the third resident pastor of Kokomo, from June 
1872 to September 1873, attending also to Tipton as a mission; 



, , The Clergy, Continued. Ill 

from October 1, 1873 till March 1,'1882, he was the pastor of 
St. Patrick's Church at Lagro. He was the first resident pastor 
at Dunnington, from June 1882 to the summer of 1884; first 
resident pastor of Monroeville, from 1884 to 1886. He was the 
pastor of Marion, from October 1886 till January 1894, attend- 
ing also to Fairmount as a station. He was the resident pastor 
at St. Peter's Church, Laporte, from January 1, 1894 till 
October 1897, when owing to ill health, he was compelled to 
resign. He died January 24, 1899 and was buried at Lafay- 
ette. 



THE REV. ALPHONSE GRUSSl, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Sidney, Ohio, October 5, 1859; ordained 
priest, at Cathagena, Ohio, July 29, 1883. He visited North 
Judson from Rensselaer. He attended Wheatfield, from 
October 1895 till 1897. 



THE REV. CHARLES B. GUENDLING. 

He was born at Peru, Indiana, on January 15, 1868. He 
studied the classics and one year of philosophy in St. Francis' 
Seminary, Wisconsin, one year of philosophy and four years 
of theology, in the North American College, at Rome, Italy. 
He was ordained priest by Cardinal Parocchi, in the Lateran 
BasiUca, on June 11, 1892. His appointments were: Secre- 
tary of the Bishop, and Chancellor of the diocese and assistant 
at the Cathedral at Fort Wayne. In July 1898 he was ap- 
pointed Superintendent of the St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, 
at Lafayette. He is the Secretary of the Diocesan School 
Board. 



THE REV. JOHN H. GUENDLING. 

He was born December 19, 1855 at Peru, Indiana. He 
entered Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, in 1870. 
Having completed his classical studies, he was sent to the 
North American College, Rome, Italy, in 1876, but owing to 



112 The Diocese of Fort Wayne, 

continued ill health, he was obliged to return to his native 
country in 1878. He then entered the Sulpician Seminary at 
Baltimore, Maryland, where he completed his course in theology 
and was ordained priest, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, by 
Bishop Dwenger, on July 2, 1880. The Bishop made him 
Superintendent of St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum at Lafayette, 
in July 1880, holding this position till July 1898. On July 15, 
1898 he was appointed pastor of the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, 
and in January 1899 Bishop Rademacher made him his Vicar 
General. From the death of Bishop Rademacher on January 
12, 1900 until the accession of Bishop Alerding, he was Admin- 
istrator of the diocese. To recuperate his health he took a 
trip West, in February, 1901. From June 29, 1901 to July 4, 
1902, he had charge of Goshen. On the latter date he was 
named the successor of Father Meissner, deceased, as irre- 
movable rector of St. Charles' Church at Peru. Father Guend- 
ling is a member of the Bishop's Council and a member of the 
Diocesan School Board. 



THE REV. PHILIP GUETHOFF. 

He was born November 18, 1856 in London, England, of 
German parents. He made his classical studies in St. Law- 
rence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and his studies in 
philosophy and theology in St. Francis' Seminary, the Arch- 
diocese of Milwaukee. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 11, 1884. 
He was the pastor of St. Catharine's Church, Nix Settlement, 
with Roanoke as a mission, from June 15, 1884 to July 1, 
1889. He has been the pastor of St. Mary's Church at Crown 
Point, from July 1, 1889. He is a member of the Diocesan 
Building Committee. 



THE REV. ANGELUS HAFERTEPE, O. F. M. 

He was born at Voltlage, diocese of Osnabrueck, Germany, 
on June 24, 1855; came to America in 1857; ordained priest, 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 15, 1878; visited the mission 
Frankfort from Lafayette, from January till August 1896. 



The Clergy, Continued. 113 

THE REV. DENIS J. HAGERTY, C. S. C. 

He was born in London, February 17, 1856, and came to 
America at the age of twelve. Having resided in Wisconsin a 
few years, he joined the Congregation of the Holy Cross, and 
was ordained priest May 1, 1880. He was pastor of St. Pat- 
rick's Church, South Bend, from August 1880 until January 
1891. He was the pastor of Kewanna and the mission Lucerne 
from the spring to September 1896. At present he is chaplain 
at St. Mary's Academy, Notre Dame. 



THE REV. MICHAEL MARY HALLINAN. 

His name appears on the baptismal records of the Cathe- 
dral, at Fort Wayne, on August 13, 1865. He was the assistant 
to Father Hamilton, pastor at St. Mary's Church, Lafayette 
for eight years, up to the time of Father Hamilton's death, in 
1875. He was the resident pastor at Wabash, from November 
1879 till November 1881. Later he became Vicar General of 
Bishop Fitzgerald of Little Rock, Arkansas, which position he 
held up to the time of his death four years later. 



THE REV. GEORGE A. HAMILTON. 

He was a native of Marion county, Kentucky, born in 
1818. He was educated at St. Mary's College, Lebanon, Ken- 
tucky, and was ordained priest by Bishop Quarter, in the 
Cathedral of Chicago, on August 19, 1846. On his mother's 
side, he was descendant of the Spalding family from Kentucky. 
His first labors were in the diocese of Chicago. Upon the 
establishment of the diocese of Fort Wayne, he transferred to 
this diocese, taking charge of St. Vincent de Paul's Church, at 
Logansport, from .August 1859 to January 1864. While here, 
he attended to various missions, such as, Peru, Delphi, Winamac, 
Kentland, Kokomo, Frankfort, Kewanna and Lucerne. He 
became the pastor of St. Mary's Church, at Lafayette in 1864. 
He joined the first American pilgrimage to Rome in company 
with Bishop Dwenger, in May, 1874. He died quite suddenly 
on April 10, 1875. His remains rest beneath St. Mary's 
Church, Lafayette. 



114 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOSEPH DE MUTZIG HAMION. 

He was ordained priest by Bishop de la Hailandiere, on 
August 16, 1840. He was the first assistant of Father Benoit, 
at St. Augustine's Church, Fort Wayne, from September 1840 
to April 17, 1842. His name appears on the records of St. 
Mary's Church, at Decatur, and of Hesse Casse^ in 1841. He 
died at Logansport, in the early part of 1842. 



THE REV. BONAVENTURE HAMMER, O. F. M. 

He was born June 23, 1842; entered the Order, October 4, 
1860; ordained priest, August 5, 1865; in Lafayette, since 
April 1882, at St. Boniface's Church. He is a noted litterateur, 
a thorough German and English scholar, the autho of numerous 
works. Among other productions of his, we may mention the 
splendid rendition of Ben Hur into German. 



THE REV. BARTHOLEMEW HARTMANN. 

He was born in Nieder-Orschel, diocese of Paderborn, 
Germany, on May 18, 1851. He studied the classics with 
Dean Ostrop, in Alton, Illinois. His philosophical and theo- 
logical studies were made in St. Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, 
and in Montreal. He was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, 
in Fort Wayne, on February 20, 1875. His appointments 
were: Superintendent of the Orphan Asylum at Rensselaer 
and Lafayette, from the time of his ordination until July 1880; 
pastor of Areola and Monroeville, from 1880 till 1886; pastor 
of Monroeville, from 1887 till 1893. Owing to poor health, he 
was for a time chaplain in the hospital at Logansport, and 
assistant at St. Paul's Church, Fort Wayne. But since 1895, 
he was obliged to abandon the active ministry and took up his 
residence in Alton, Illinois, where he died on June 12, 1903. 



THE REV. JAMES M. HARTNETT. 

He was the assistant at the Cathedral in Fort Wayne, 
from 1878 till October 23, 1880, the date of his death. He is 
buried at Valparaiso. 



I 



The Clergy, Continued. 115 

THE REV. JULIUS HEFFNER, C. PP. S. 



He was born at Thompson, Lima county, Ohio, December 
4, 1870; entered the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood, 
November 12, 1885; ordained priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, by 
Archbishop Elder, April 26, 1895. He was the pastor of Holy 
Trinity Church, Jay county, from 1901 to 1906. 



THE REV. DANIEL HEILE, O. F. M. 

He was born August 6, 1842; entered the Order, September 
8, 1870; ordained priest, July 26, 1874; pastor at St. Boniface's 
Church, Lafayette, from August 1882 to September 1887; died 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 23, 1905. 



THE REV. ANTHONY HERMAN HEITMANN. 

He was born in Lastrupe, Oldenburg, diocese of Munster, 
Germany, on September 18, 1832. He made his studies at the 
Gymnasium of Vechta and in the University of Munster; 
emigrated to America September 24, 1864. He was ordained 
priest in Fort Wayne, by Bishop Luers, on March 25, 1865. 
His first appointment was that of assistant, at St. Mary's 
Church in Fort Wayne, until October 1870. He was the pastor 
of St. John's Church, at St. John, from October 1870 till July 
1, 1906, when he resigned. He is at present pastor emeritus 
continuing to reside at St. John. 



THE REV. JOHN CAPISTRAN HEITMANNO, . F. M. 

He was born December 2, 1859; entered the Order, Septem- 
ber 14, 1876; ordained priest, October 4, 1882; assistant in 
Lafayette, rom September 1890 to August 1891, at St. Boni- 
face's Church during which time he also visited the station 
Frankfort. 



116 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. HENRY A. HELLHAKE. 

He was born February 9, 1849, at Quincy, Illinois, in the 
diocese of Alton. He studied the classics at St. Francis' 
College, of his native place, and his philosophy and theology 
in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee. He was ordained priest 
for the diocese of A' ton, on April 21, 1872, at Quincy. He was 
admitted to the diocese of Fort Wayne, and was appointed 
pastor of Columbia City, from October 1875 to May 1886; was 
pastor of Remington until August 1893, of Lebanon, and 
missions, till August 1898, of Fowler, until August 12, 1900, 
and since that time, he has been pastor of Sheldon and 
Bluffton. 



THE REV. ANTHONY HENNEBERGER. 

He was the son of Frank and Lucy (Gilles) Henneberger, 
born at Luetz, on the bank of the river Mosel, in the diocese of 
Treves, Germany, on April 2, 1859. His desire was to become 
a priest, and when the Prussian Government closed all Catholic 
institutions, he emigrated to America and settled near Prince- 
ton, Indiana, in 1874: he, his mother and four sisters. In 
September 1880, he entered St. Meinrad's College, and upon 
the recommendation of the Abbot, Bishop Dwenger ordained 
him for the diocese of Fort Wayne, in his Cathedral, on June 14, 
1889. On that same day, he was appointed the pastor at 
Fowler, where he remained until August 7, 1898, and was given 
charge of Attica. On account of his health failing him, he was 
obliged to give up the active ministry, from April 1899 until 
August 12, 1900, when he was again given charge of his former 
parish at Fowler, Indiana. On January 1, 1907 he was trans- 
ferred to St. John's Church, at Tipton. 



THE REV. THEODORE HIBBELEN. 

He was ordained priest in 1871. He died, pastor emeritus, 
January 13, 1899, at St. Louis, where he is buried. 



The Clergy, Continued. 117 

THE REV. HILARY HOEtSCHER, O. F. M. 

He was born October 14, 1857; entered the Order, Septem- 
ber 4, 1875; ordained priest, September 29, 1880; pastor in 
Lafayette, from July 1892 to July 1897, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



THE REV HENRY HOERSTMANN. 

He was born at Delphos, Ohio, on July 26, 1882. He 
attended the parochial school in his native town, and made 
his classical studies at St. Joseph's College near Rensselaer, 
Indiana. His philosophical and theological studies were 
begun and finished at Mount St Mary's Seminary, Cedar 
Point, Ohio. He received tonsure in June, 1904; the two 
first Minors, in June, 1905; the two second Minors, in June, 
1906; Subdeaconship on March 15th, and Deaconship on 
March 16, 1907. He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, 
in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 22, 1907. 



THE REV. WILLIAM HOFF. 

He was born in Chicago, Illinois, on March 13, 1878. He 
completed all his studies at the Pontifical College, Josephinum 
at Co'umbus, Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop Hartley, 
at Columbus, Ohio, on April 8, 1905. He was appointed the 
assistant priest in St. Joseph's Church, at Logansport, on May 
11, 1905. 



THE REV. WILLIAM S. HOGAN. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, October 9, 1869. 
His studies were made at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained 
priest at Fort Wayne by Bishop Rademacher, on June 24, 
1897. His appointments were: Assistant at St. Vincent's 
Church in Logansport rom July 4, 1897 till August 7, 1898; 
pastor of Lebanon and missions, from August 7, 1898 till May 
7, 1899; assistant at Logansport, from May 7, 1899 till February 
1, 1900; pastor of Dunkirk and missions, from March 1900 till 



118 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

September 7, 1902; pastor of Goshen, from September 7, 1902 
till February 1903; pastor of St. Pau 's Church, Valparaiso, 
since February 1903. 



THE REV. NICHOLAS HOLTEL, O. F. M. 

He was born April 9, 1853; entered the Order, August 25, 
1869; ordained priest, February 13, 1876; assistant at St. 
Boniface's Church Lafayette, from March 1876 to April 1877; 
died at Peoria, Illinois, March 30 1895. 



THE REV. WILLIAM B. HORDEMAN. 

He was born at Rensselaer, Indiana, on September 19, 
1875. He studied the classics at St. Joseph's College, near 
Rensselaer, philosophy and theology at Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and was ordained priest by Bishop 
Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 17, 1905. 
His appointments were: Assistant to Rev. F. C. Wiechmann 
at Gas City; assistant at the Cathedral, from January 18th, to 
February 5, 1906; substitute at Fowler, from February 5th, to 
March 5, 1906; at St. Bernard's Church, Crawfordsville from 
April 4th, to April 15, 1906; assistant at SS. Peter and Paul's 
Church, Huntington, from August 28th, to October 30, 1906; 
pastor of Frankfort and the mission Cicero, since October 30, 
1906. 



THE REV. GEORGE H. HORSTMANN. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, on November 15, 1872. 
From the seventh to the fourteenth year of his age, he attended 
St. Mary's parochial school. In 1888 he began his classical 
studies in St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin. 
In 1892 he was sent to Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
for the study of philosophy and theology, and was ordained 
priest by Bishop Rademacher, at Fort Wayne, on June 24, 
1897. His appointments were: Assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, Michigan City, till August 1900; pastor of Reynolds 
and its missions, from August 1900 to July 1905; pastor at 
Remington, since July 4, 1905. 



^ 



The Clergy, Continued. 119 

THE REV. JOHN HOSS. 

He was born at Dalheim, Luxemburg, on October 5, 1841. 
He came to America, on September 24, 1872, and was ordained 
priest, April 25, 1878. He was the pastor of St. Anthony's, 
Benton county, from October 1878 till June 1884, attending 
also to Earl Park as a mission, and up to 1880, to Goodland as 
a station, continuing to visit it as a mission until 1883. He 
was the resident pastor of Monroeville, from 1886 to 1887. 
Residing at the Old Peoples' Home, Avilla, he attended to 
Kendallville, from 1887 to 1889. He returned to Europe, 
where he died and is buried. 



THE REV. GUST AVE HOTTENROTH. 

The son of John and Margareth (Humburg) Hottenroth, 
was born August 19, 1872, at Hundeshagen, Eichsfeld, prov- 
ince of Saxony, Germany. Having attended the parochial 
schools of his native village, he entered the college of St. 
Charles, near Aix-la-Chapelle. Completing his philosophy in 
Liege, Belgium, and having emigrated to America, in Novem- 
ber 1893, he made his theological studies in St. Meinrad's Sem- 
inary, Spencer county, Indiana, conducted by the Benedictine 
Fathers. He was ordained priest there by Bishop Chatard, 
of Indianapolis, on May 30, 1896, for the diOcese of Fort Wayne. 
His first and present appointment is that of assistant priest to 
Mgr. Oechtering at St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. EDWARD JOSEPH HOULIHAN. 

He was born in South Bend, Indiana, on August 30, 1874. 
He studied the classics and philosophy in St. Lawrence's 
College, Montreal, Canada, and theology in Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 24, 1902. 
He was pastor pro tem. at Goshen; assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, in Lafayette; pastor of Kewanna and Lucerne, since 
October 20, 1904. 



a- 

I 



120 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. EBERHARD HUELSMANN, O. F. M. 

He was born March 27, 1849; entered the Order, August 
12, 1867; ordained priest, May 25, 1872; assistant at St. Boni- 
face's Church, Lafayette, from August 1873 to August 1874. 



THE REV. JOHN HERMAN HUESER, D. D. 

He was born November 8, 1839, in Steinhausen, West- 
phaHa. He made his philosophical and theological studies at 
Munster and Innsbruck, where the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity, was conferred on him. He was ordained priest, on 
September 21, 1863 in Brixen, Tyrol. Having 'abored three 
years in his native diocese, he entered the American College 
in Louvain, Belgium, in October 1866, for the study of the 
English language in the mean time he also taught dogmatic 
theology. 

He landed in New York in October 1867. Bishop de 
St. Palais placed him in charge of Millhausen, Decatur county, 
Indiana, in the diocese of Vincennes. At that time the settle- 
ment of Catholic co'onies in the South was being agitated, and 
Father Hueser taking a deep interest in this movement placed 
himself at the disposal of Bishop Feehan, of Nashville, who 
sent him to Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. Another priest taking 
charge of Lawrenceburg, Father Hueser started a new settle- 
ment fourteen miles further south, naming it Loretto. Here 
he built a house and church. He built another church, St. 
Joseph's, still further south. Eight miles east of St. Joseph, 
he established St. Mary's settlement, and built a log church. 
With the permission of Bishop Quinlan of Mobile, he established 
a colony near Florence, Alabama, and named it St. Florian; 
having built a frame church and priest's house. Rev. Michael 
Merz became the first pastor. After five years, Father Hueser 
returned North, where in Cincinnati, he became the editor of 
the Wahrheitsfreund, during the sickness of editor, Baumstark. 
In August 1876 he came to the diocese of Fort Wayne, and for 
one year was the acting pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's Church, 
Huntington. From August 1877 until January 1880, he was 
pastor at Hesse Cassel, on which latter date he was appointed 



The Clergy, Continued. 121 

pastor and later irremovable rector SS. Peter and Paul's 
Church, Huntington. His health necessitated a change of 
climate and on August 24, 1906, Father Hueser tendered his 
resignation, and on September 10th, of the same year, he left 
for Carlsbad, New Mexico. Much of Doctor Hueser's time was 
spent in Hterary work, besides his communications to the 
current journals, he wrote four volumes of sermon sketches, 
the Catechism in the pulpit, First Instructions in the Catholic 
Catechism for the use of teachers and pupils, and a prayer and 
meditation book for the use of the sick, and for priests attending 
the sick, bearing the title, "Lord, behold, he whom Thou 
lovest is sick. 



THE REV. CHRYSOSTOM HUMMER, C PP. S. 

He was born March 9, 1866, at Luxemburg, Stearns county, 
Minnesota. He pursued his studies at St. Charles' Seminary, 
Carthagena, Ohio, and was ordained priest, by the Most Rev. 
W. H. Elder, D. D., June 21, 1893. He taught one year at 
the St. Joseph's Indian and Normal School. From June 1894 
to September 1896, he was pastor of St. Michael's Church, at 
KaHda, Ohio, and from 1896 to January 1903, he was professor 
at St. Joseph's College, Collegeville, Indiana, from which pos - 
tion he was transferred to the pastorate of the Church of the 
Most Precious Blood at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. BONIFACE IWASZEWSKI, C. S. C. 

He was born May 1875, in Poland; received the habit, 
August 15, 1896; profession, August 15, 1898; ordained priest, 
August 12, 1900, at Washington, D. C, by Bishop Curtis. He 
is the assistant at St. Hedwig's Church, South Bend. 



THE REV. JOSEPH JAGEMANN. 

He was born in Ershausen, province of Saxony, Germany, 
on May 21, 1879. He made his classical studies in Leipsic, 
Germany, two years of philosophy and one year of theology in 



122 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Paderborn, Germany, and two years of theology in St. Francis' 
Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 18, 
1904. His appointments were: Assistant at St. Joseph's 
Church, Mishawaka; assistant at SS. Peter and Paul's Church, 
Huntington. With the permission of the Right Rev. Bishop 
of Fort Wayne, he has an appointment in the Archdiocese of 
St. Paul. 



THE REV. FRANCIS J. JANSEN. 

He was born at Essen, Germany, on May 7, 1874. The 
family emigrated to America in 1883. He attended the 
parochial schools in New York, and at the age of thirteen, 
became the private secretary of Mr. Louis Benziger of Benziger 
Brothers. From 1888 till 1893, he studied at St. Lawrence's 
College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, was received into the 
diocese of Fort Wayne, and made his philosophical and theo- 
logical course in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, until 
June 16, 1898, on which date he was ordained priest by Arch- 
bishop Elder. He was assistant at St. Mary's Church Lafayette, 
from September 10, 1898 till June 17, 1899; was appointed 
pastor of Frankfort and missions June 21, 1899, where he 
remained until October 30, 1906, when he was appointed 
pastor of St. Vincent's Church at Elkhart. 



THE REV. THOMAS FRANCIS JANSEN. 

He was born December 25, 1872, on mid-ocean, his parents 
emigrating and settling in Fort Wayne. He attended St. 
Peter's parochial school at Fort Wayne. In the fall of 1890, 
he entered St. Lawrence's College, at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, 
where he studied the classics. Having completed his classical 
course, he entered Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, 
to pursue the study of philosophy, for two years, and theology, 
for three. He was ordained priest by His Eminence Sebastian 
Cardinal Martinelli, Apostolic Delegate to the United States, 
in the Josephinum at Columbus, on July 3, 1900. For one 
month he relieved Rev. Louis Moench at Valparaiso. His first 
appointment was that of assistant to Rev. John Bleckmann at 



The Clergy, Continued. 123 

Michigan City, from August 12, 1900, till February 27, 1903, 
when he was made pastor of St. Bridget's Church at Hobart 
and SS. Peter and Paul's Church at Lottaville (Turkey Creek). 
On November 6, 1905, Lottaville received a resident pastor. 



THE REV. THEODORE JARZYNSKl, C. S. C. 

He was born October 25, 1869, in Russian, Poland; received 
the habit, March 19, 1896; profession, March 19, 1898; ordained 
priest, November 6, 1898, by Bishop Hurth of Dacca, India, 
at Notre Dame. He was assistant priest to Father Czyzewski 
at St. Hedwig's Church, in South Bend. At present he is in 
the diocese of Denver. 



THE REV. PETER JOHANNES, C. S. C. 

He was born at Eischen, in the Grand Duchy of Luxem- 
burg, on September 29, 1855. The family emigrated to 
America where he entered the novitiate at Notre Dame, Indiana, 
and was ordained priest October 12, 1878. He labored in New 
Orleans until the end of 1881, when on account of ill health, 
owing to the Southern climate, his superiors recalled him to 
Notre Dame. In February 1882, he was appointed the first 
regular pastor of the German Catholics in South Bend. Here 
he organized St. Mary's Congregation. He celebrated his 
Sacerdotal Silver Jubilee, on October 12, 1903, and on the 
morning of the 27th of the same month, 1904, he was found 
dead in his bed, having suffered a stroke of apoplexy. 



THE REV. HERMAN JURASCHEK. 

He was born on August 12, 1873, in Geseke, near Pader- 
born, province Westphalia, Germany. He entered the 
Gymnasium of Geseke, when in 1889, he emigrated to America, 
and studied at St. Francis' College, Quincy, Illinois, then two 
years at St Francis' Seminary, at Milwaukee. He finished 
his theological studies at St. John's, CoUegeville, Minnesota, 
where he was ordained priest for the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
on June 24, 1896 by Bishop Marty. He was made assistant 



124 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

at the Cathedral, and for three months had charge of Union 
City. After which he was the assistant at St. Mary's Church, 
Michigan City, from October 13, 1896 to July 17, 1897. He 
was pastor of Ege for four months. He became pastor at 
Summit, on November 12, 1897, and remained until May 10, 
1899, when he took charge of Chesterton, up to the present time. 



THE REV. ALPHONSE M. JUST, C. S. C. 

He was born at Harlange-Wiltz, Grand Duchy of Luxem- 
burg, Germany, on May 27, 1879. He made his elementary 
studies at Harlange; his classical, at the Athenseum in Luxem- 
burg and at Le Vesinet, France, (Seine et Oise). He entered 
the Novitiate of the Congregation of the Holy Cross at Angers, 
France, (Maine et Loire) in 1900; received the habit, August 
15, 1900; made his profession, on December 8, 1902. He made 
his philosophical studies in the study-house of the Congregation 
and in the University of Angers, till April 1903, when, on 
account of the French persecution, he was obliged to leave, 
going to Rome, Italy, where he remained until December 1903. 
He was now sent to the study-house of the Congregation in 
Chittagong, Eastern Assam and Bengal, East British Indies, 
Asia, where he pursued his theological course, from 1904 till 
1906, when sickness obliged him to come to America. He 
completed his course at the American Catholic University, 
Washington, D. C, and was ordained priest, by Bishop Hurth, 
C. S. C. at the University of Notre Dame, on August 2, 1906. 
He was made the assistant at the Sacred Heart Church, 
South Bend, and upon the death of Father Klein, C. S. C, 
October 6, 1906, was appointed his successor. 



THE REV. MAURICE KAEDER, O. S. B. 

He was born at Kammern, Archdiocese of Cologne, May 
27, 1837; came to America in 1847; ordained priest, June 2, 
1860. He was the pastor at Crown Point, from July 1882 to 
September 1888. 



The Clergy, Continued. 125 

THE REV. PETER ALOYSIUS KAHELLEK. 

He was born on April 25, 1865, in the diocese of Culm, 
Germany. He studied the classics at St. John's University, 
Minnesota, and St. Francis, Wisconsin, philosophy in Sandwich, 
Canada, and theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained priest by Archbishop Elder, at Cin- 
cinnati, on June 17, 1897. His first appointment was that of 
pastor at North Judson, where he remained till July 2, 1899, 
attending to Wheatfield, from February 12th, till June 1898. 
Since July 2, 1899, he has had charge of St. Casimir's Church, 
Hammond. 



THE REV. HENRY C. KAPPEL. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, on February 2, 1873. He 
attended St. Mary's parochial school. The Rev. Charles 
Romer, assistant at St. Mary's Church gave him private 
instructions, whereupon he took up his classical course at St. 
Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin. His studies 
in philosophy and theology were begun and completed at 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was or- 
dained priest, by Bishop Rademacher, on June 24, 1897. His 
first appointment was that of assistant priest to Rev. H. M. 
Plaster, at St. Joseph's Church, Hammond, from August 1897 
to February 1899. From February to June 1899, he was 
assistant to Rev. B. Kroeger at St. Bridget's Church, Logans- 
port. He was pastor of Walkerton and missions, from Septem- 
ber 10, 1899 to July 14, 1901, being its first resident pastor. 
From July 14, 1901 to June 30, 1905, he was pastor of Fair- 
mount, with Matthews, as' a station. For two and a half 
months he remained as pastor of St. Michael's Church, Ply- 
mouth, when on September 13, 1905, he received his appoint- 
ment, pastor of Areola and the mission Pierceton. Since June 
8, 1907, he has charge of Oxford. 



THE REV. JOHN KASPRZYKOWSKL 

He was born at Grunsberg, Germany, on June 10, 1877. 
He studied the classics at St. Lawrence's College, Mount Cal- 
vary, Wisconsin; philosophy at SS. Cyrillus and Methodius' 



126 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Seminary, Detroit, Michigan ; theology at the Kenrick Seminary, 
in St. Louis. He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, in 
the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 22, 1906. Since his 
ordination he has been the assistant at St. Stanislaus' Church, 
Michigan City. 



THE REV. JOHN C. KELLER. 

He was born at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, diocese of 
Scranton, on September 12, 1875. He studied the classics at 
Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and philosophy and theology at 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained 
priest by Archbishop Elder, in Cincinnati, on June 16, 1899. 
His appointments were: Assistant at St. Charles' Church, 
Peru, from July 5, 1899 to July 12, 1901; assistant at St. 
Joseph's Church, Mishawaka, from July 12, 1901 to June 8, 
1902; pastor of Kendallville and the missions Ligonier and 
Rome City, since June 8, 1902. 



THE REV. MICHAEL F. KELLY. 

He was the pastor of Marion, from 1876 till 1882; pastor 
of Lagro, from April 20, 1882, till January 1884; pastor of 
Kewanna and the missions Lucerne and Rochester, from 1884 
till the fall of 1886; pastor of Lebanon, from the fall of 1886 till 
October 4, 1893, the date of his death. He is buried at 
Lafayette. 



THE REV. CHARLES FREDERICK KEYSER. 

He was born in Monroe, Michigan, on February 2, 1875. 
He made his classical studies at the University of Notre Dame 
and the Assumption College, Sandwich, Canada, philosophical 
and theological, at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, on October 
11, 1902, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne. On the same day, 
he was appointed assistant to Rev. Henry Boeckelmann, 
pastor of St. Vincent's Church, at Elkhart. In October 1903, 



The Clergy, Continued. 127 

he received the appointment of assistant to Rev. Henry M. 
Plaster, pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Hammond. On Novem- 
ber 6, 1905, he was made pastor of Lowell and assisting the 
Rev. Anthony Heitmann, pastor of St. John's Church, St. 
John. From July 1, 1906, till November 21st, of the same 
year, he was the acting pastor of St. John, on which latter date 
he was made pastor of Lowell. On June 8, 1907, he was 
transferred to North Judson, having charge also of the mission 
San Pierre. 



THE REV. EDMUND B. KILROY, D. D. 

He was born on November 24, 1830, in Ireland, received 
his education in the University o" Notre Dame. On July 13, 
1849, he entered the Congregation of the Holy Cross, made his 
profession, on August 15, 1853. Ordained a priest, he became 
a professor at Notre Dame and afterwards for two years, 
President of St. Mary's College of Chicago. Having separated 
from the Congregation of the Holy Cross, he was pastor, first 
at Laporte, from 1854 to July 1859. He succeeded Father 
Gillen as resident pastor at Michigan City, having jurisdiction 
over both St. Ambrose and St. Mary's Churches, until September 
1860. He was also pastor of Lafayette at St. Mary's Church. 
He accepted an appointment of chaplain of the army during 
the Civil War in 1861. From 1863 till 1867, he attended 
Oxford. Later he went to Ontario, Canada, West; in 1869, 
he was at St. Mary's, Ontario, later at Strattford, where he died. 



THE REV. FRANCIS A. KING. 

He was born on March 25, 1861, in Delphi, Indiana. His 
studies were made in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
He was ordained priest in Milwaukee, by Archbishop Heiss, on 
June 29, 1885. His appointments were: Pastor of Covington 
and missions till 1890; pastor of Union City, from 1890 till 
1899; pastor of Goshen; assistant at Goodland, from June 1902 



128 The Diocese of Fort Wayne, 

till August 9, 1903; at present he is assistant of St. Vincent de 
Paul's Church, Logansport, residing in St. Joseph's Hospital 
of the same city. 



THE REV. MARTIN KINK. 

He was pastor of Pulaski, from 1862 to 1863, with Indian 
Creek, Klaasville for missions. He was pastor of SS. Peter 
and Paul's Church, at Huntington, from August to December 
1863. He attended Hesse Cassel and Sheldon, from 1863 to 
1866. He was a native of Bavaria, to which country he re- 
turned and where he died. 



THE REV. PETER P. KLEIN, C. S. C. 

He was born at Portsmouth, Ohio, on July 16, 1862, where 
he attended the parochial school of St. Mary's Church until 
July 1, 1875. He completed his classical course at Notre Dame, 
in June 1880, after which he became a member of the Congre- 
gation of the Holy Cross and taught in St. Joseph's College, 
Cincinnati. In 1881 he was sent to Montreal, Canada, where 
he taught in the institution known as Cote-des-Neiges, at 
which place he was ordained priest, on February 28, 1885, and 
was made president of the institution. When he left in 1887, 
the attendance had increased from 38 to 221 with a corre- 
sponding improvement in the buildings. He was sent to 
Europe on business of the Congregation in 1887, and upon his 
return he was appointed president of St. Isidore's College, at 
New Orleans. He remained two and one-half years for the 
good of this institution. In the midst of his activity, he 
suffered an apoplectic stroke and returned to Notre Dame. 
After that for five years, he was president of St. Edward's 
College, Austin, Texas; after which he gave missions in various 
parts of the country. In 1905, he was again sent to Europe on 
important business. On March 25, 1906, he was made pastor 
of Sacred Heart Church, South Bend, where he died on October 
6, 1906. 



The Clergy, Continued. 129 

THE REV. FRANCIS J. KOCH. 

He was born in Nix Settlement, Whitley county, Indiana, 
on September 18, 1868. From the eighteenth year of his age 
until 1894, he was a teacher in the public school, after which 
he studied the classics in St. Viateur's College, Illinois, and St. 
Joseph's College, Indiana. Philosophy and theology he studied 
in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, and was ordained 
priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, 
on May 24, 1902. His appointments were: Assistant at St. 
Joseph's Church, Hammond, from June 1902 till October 1903; 
pastor of St. Anthony's, Benton county, since October 1903. 
Twenty-five years ago he went to school to a man who is now 
one of his parishoners. 



THE REV. HENRY KOEHNE. 

He was born in Altenbergen, Westphalia, Germany, on 
June 2, 1835. Until the twelfth year of his age, he attended 
the schools of his native place, after which he attended college 
for his classical course. He emigrated to this country in the 
company of the Rev. Joseph Fisch, in the month of October 
1859. He studied phi'osophy and theology, in St. Mary's 
University, Chicago, Illinois, and together with six other 
students, was ordained priest, on the Feast of Pentecost, May 
24, 1863, by Bishop Duggan. He was given charge of the 
parish at Henry, Illinois, together with five neighboring mis- 
sions. The fact that he administered Baptism to three hundred 
and sixty, during the first year, shows how numerous the 
Catholics were, scattered about in these missions. Later he 
had charge of the missions Danville and Champaign of the same 
State. Having become acquainted with Bishop Dwenger, he 
was soon admitted a member of the Fort Wayne, diocesan 
clergy, and was given charge at once of St. Joseph's Parish at 
Logansport, where he labored, from August 24, 1872 till 
November 24, 1906, the date of his death. His remains rest 
in the cemetery at Logansport. 



130 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. EDWARD KOENIG. 

He was born on September 1, 1827, at Brilon in West- 
phalia, and was ordained priest, at Paderborn, on March 28, 
1852. Having exercised the sacred ministry in several places 
of his native diocese, he was appointed the spiritual director 
of the Insane Asylum at Marsburg, which position he filled 
during ten years. He emigrated to America and arrived in 
Fort Wayne, on November 23, 1865, when he was appointed 
pastor of the new St. Paul's Congregation. It was under his 
direction that much of the work accomplished was done. It 
was also owing to his efforts that St. Joseph's Hospital was 
built. Father Koenig departed this life on January 22, 1898. 
He was a universal favorite, a man and priest of the most 
amiable character. His remains rest in the cemetery at Fort 
Wayne. 



THE REV. FREDERICK KOENIG. 

He was born on July 1, 1873, at Brilon, Diocese of Pader- 
born, Germany, He studied the classics in Brilon and Steyl, 
Germany, philosophy in Moedlingen, Germany, theology in 
Louvain, Belgium. He was ordained priest at Louvain, by 
Bishop Maes, of Covington, Kentucky, for the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, on June 29, 1897. For three months he was assistant 
at Hartford City, six months, the assistant at Union City, 
when in September 1898, he was made the first resident pastor 
of Lowell, with Wheatfield and Kniman, as missions. On 
November 6, 1905 he was transferred to the pastorate of 
Lottaville, better known as Turkey Creek. 



THE REV. HENRY KOENIG. 

He was born in Heiligenstadt, diocese of Paderborn, 
Germany, on October 7, 1835. He was ordained priest, on 
June 9, 1859, at Carlow, Ireland. He emigrated to America, 
in October 1859. He was the second resident pastor at Mish- 
awaka, from 1859 till 1867, visiting also Elkhart. He was the 



The Clergy, Continued. 131 

first resident pastor, at Winamac in 1867, and from 1868 to 
the close of 1872, was the pastor of Pulaski and Indian Creek. 
While here he attended also Monterey and during the absence 
of the Rev. B. Rachor, from October 1866 till November 1868, 
paid visits to St. John. Later he became a priest of the Lacrosse 
diocese, being pastor of St. Mary's Church at Keyesville, 
Wisconsin, at the time of his death in 1892. 



THE REV. EERDINAND KOERDT. 

He was born at Oestinghausen, Westphalia, Germany, on 
August 23, 1853, a son of Henry and Catharine Koerdt. His 
father was a farmer. During his boyhood days, he attended 
the schools of his native village,until he was twelve years of 
age, after which he took private lessons for eight months, and 
then began his collegiate course at Bechem, in September 1866. 
Having spent three years at this place, he entered the Royal 
Gymnasium at Paderborn. Two years later, October 31, 1871, 
the young man began his philosophical and theological courses 
at Munster. Having completed three years of his theological 
course, he taught a private school for one year. The May-laws, 
better known as the Kultur-kampf, induced him to emigrate 
to America, in August 1875. He entered Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was ordained priest by 
Bishop Dwenger, on July 8, 1876, in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne. His first appointment was that of pastor of Sheldon 
with Bluffton as a mission. On July 3, 1896, he was transferred 
to the pastorate of St. Peter's Church, Fort Wayne. Father 
Koerdt was particularly noted as a school man. He was 
appointed a member of the School Board in 1883. In 1895, 
he was made the Defensor of the Matrimonial Court. He was 
the Secretary of the Diocesan Synods since 1880. In 1900, 
St. Peter's was named an irremovable rectorship. Though 
young, his health was broken down and he was obliged to seek 
rest and recuperation in the spring of 1905. God willed differ- 
ently, and on May 7th, of the same year, he departed this life 
at Los Angeles, California. His remains rest in the cemetery 
at Fort Wayne. 



132 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOHN F. KOHL. 

He was born at South Germantown, Wisconsin, on Novem- 
ber 24, 1879. He attended the parochial schools of his native 
place. From September 5, 1894, until 1897, he spent in the 
study of the classics at St. Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, com- 
pleting the same at St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, 
Wisconsin. In June 1900, he was sent to St. Meinrad's Sem- 
inary, at St. Meinrad, Indiana, where he completed his philo- 
sophical and theological studies, and was ordained priest by 
Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, on June 17, 
1905. He was assistant priest in St. Bridget's Church, Logans- 
port, from June 30, 1905. 



THE REV. GEORGE KOLESINSKI. 

He was born in the village Romanizki in Lithuania Russian 
Poland. He entered the "Congregatio Marianorum" on March 
19, 1853, and was ordained priest on February 13, 1859, by 
Bishop Welnezewski, and during the Polish Insurrection, he 
was exiled to Siberia, in 1863. Returning from there, he was 
imprisoned for nine months in 1888. Having emigrated to 
America in 1890, he labored in the Archdiocese of Chicago until 
January 19, 1894, when he was appointed pastor of the Polish 
congregation at Terre Coupee with Rolling Prairie for a mission. 
Here he remained until April 1901, when he served as assistant 
to Father Czyzewski at St. Hedwig's Church in South Bend, 
until August 1905, since which time owing to his advanced 
years, he has had no special duties. 



THE REV. PAUL KOLOPP, C. S. C. 

He was born at Alberschweiler, diocese of Nancy, in 1856. 
Having emigrated to the United States in 1873, he was ordained 
priest on June 15, 1880, at Notre Dame and was given charge 
of the German portion of St. Patrick's congregation at South 
Bend, residing with the pastor of this church. He was soon 
removed to a mission in California and later became a priest 
of the Covington, Kentucky, diocese where he died on April 
26, 1906, pastor of Corpus Christi Church, Newport, Kentucky. 



The Clergy, Continued. 133 

THE REV. MARCUS. KREKE, O. F. M. 

He was born February 19, 1852 ; entered the Order, Septem- 
ber 8, 1870; ordained priest, December 18, 1875; assistant at St, 
Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from September 1876 to April 
1877. 



THE REV. ANTHONY J. H. KROEGER. 

He was born in Kloppenburg, Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, 
Germany, on January 25, 1854. He attended the parochial 
school of his native city and there also began his study for the 
priesthood. At the instance of his uncle, the Rev. Bernard 
Kroeger, he came to the United States. He was sent to Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained 
until June 1879, the date on which that Seminary closed. He 
finished his studies at St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, and was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, in the 
Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, on December 12, 1879. His appoint- 
ments were: Assistant to Rev. B. Kroeger at St. Bridget's 
Church, Logansport, until November 24, 1880; pastor of St. 
John's Church, Goshen, with Ligonier and Millersburg as mis- 
sions, till October 20, 1888; pastor at Lagro with Andrews 
(formerly Antioch) as a mission, until June 2, 1890; pastor of 
St. John's Church, Tipton, until January 1, 1907; pastor at 
St. Joseph's Church, Logansport, since January 1, 1907. He 
is a Diocesan Consultor, Procurator Fiscalis, Synodal Examiner 
and a member of the School Board. 



THE REV. BERNARD KROEGER. 

He was born at Kloppenburg, Oldenburg, Prussia, on 
March 14, 1832. At the age of seventeen, he emigrated to the 
United States, locating temporarily at Cincinnati, Ohio, then 
for four years at Teutopolis, Illinois, after which he returned 
to Europe. In the year following, he came back to the United 
States and entered Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
remaining there for two years, after which he became a student 



134 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

in St. Vincent's Seminary, Pennsylvania, for six years. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Luers at Fort Wayne, on August 
2, 1863. For a short time, he was assistant at the Cathedra', 
Fort Wayne, after which he was sent to St. Vincent de Paul's 
Church, Logansport, as assistant to Rev. George A. Hamilton, 
visiting the missions Kewanna, Lucerne and Pulaski. He suc- 
ceeded Rev. B. Force at Peru, January 5, 1864. From here he 
also attended to the missions Lagro, Kokomo and Tipton and 
to the stations Wabash, Rochester and Fairmount. From 1872 
till March 1, 1875, he had charge of the St. Joseph's Orphan 
Asylum at Rensselaer. On the latter date, he was appointed 
to organize a new parish at Logansport, St. Bridget's Church. 
He is the dean of the Logansport district. He resigned his 
charge on July 13, 1907, owing to his advanced age and inability 
to attend to parochial work. He continues to reside in Logans- 
port. 



THE REV. WILLIAM KROEGER. 

He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, January 25, 1853. He 
made his classical studies at Teutopolis, Illinois, philosophy, 
at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, theology, at 
St. Meinrad's, Indiana. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, January 25, 1880. 
He was assistant at St. Mary's Church, Lafayette, about one 
year, when he received the appointment of pastor of St. Vin- 
cent's Church, Elkhart, where he remained until 1891. He 
died at Epiphany, South Dakota, December 8, 1904, where he 
is buried. 



THE REV. H. F. JOSEPH KROLL. 

He was born at Baltimore, Maryland, October 4, 1855. 
Having completed his elementary education at the parochial 
and high school of his native city, he entered St. Vincent's 
College, forty miles east of Pittsburg to take up the classics. 
His health failing after two years, his physician advised a 
change of climate. Coming West, he became acquainted with 



The Clergy, Continued. 135 

Bishop Dwenger, who accepted him as a student of the diocese 
of Fort Wayne. He was sent to St. Francis, near Milwaukee, 
where he finished his classical, philosophical and theological 
courses. Archbishop Henni conferred Minor Orders on him 
and ordained him Subdeacon and Deacon. On July 21, 1879, 
he was ordained priest in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, by 
Bishop Dwenger. His first appointment was pastor of Ches- 
terton, where he resided, attending also to Lake Station, 
Millers, Edgemoor, Westville, Whiting and Walkerton. During 
five years, he also visited the State Prison at Michigan City. 
On February 21, 1898, Bishop Rademacher appointed him 
pastor of St. Paul's Church in Fort Wayne, his present charge. 
He is the Defensor Matrimonii and a member of the Diocesan 
School Board. 



THE REV. HERMAN VIRGILLIUS KRULL, C. PP. S. 

He was born January 12, 1874, at Lorup, Kreis Huemm- 
ling, Hanover; entered the Congregation of the Most Precious 
Blood, September 22, 1893; ordained priest, December 17, 1902, 
at Carthagena, Ohio, by Bishop Moeller of Columbus. He was 
the pastor of St. Peter's Church at Winamac, from November 
1904 till the end of January 1905. Pastor pro tem. at Kentland 
sometime between December 10, 1902, and February 13, 1903. 



THE REV. JOHN F. KUBACKI. 

He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on November 20, 
1868, the son of Thomas and Victoria (Brzezinska) Kubacki, 
natives of Poland, who emigrated to this country in 1857. He 
began his studies in St. Mary's College, Kansas, continued 
them at St. Francis' Seminary at Milwaukee, and completed 
his theological course at Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cin- 
cinnati. He was ordained priest by Archbishop Elder, on 
June 19, 1894, and was sent to North Judson, Indiana, having 
charge of San Pierre and Knox, until November 1896, when 
he was appointed pastor at Reynolds. Here he had charge 
also of Francisville and Medarryville and the stations Monon 



136 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

and Monticello. From August 6, 1900, till November 10, 1904, 
he was pastor of St. Stanislaus' Church at East Chicago. Since 
the latter date, he received an appointment in the diocese of 
Pittsburg. 



THE REV. GODFREY KUENG. 

He was born in Gotzis, Austria, diocese of Brixen, on 
January 3, 1837. He was ordained priest, on June 26, 1862 
and emigrated to America, in June 1868. He was the first 
resident pastor of St. Michael's Church at Schererville, from 
the latter part of 1875 till October 1876, when he returned to 
his native country. 



THE REV. SERAPHINE KUNKLER, C. PP. S 

He was born at Unter-Glotterthal, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, August 28, 1851 ; came to America, October 16, 1868; 
ordained priest at Fort Wayne, March 14, 1879. He was the 
assistant at SS. Peter and Paul's Church, Huntington, from 
May 1879 till January 1880. He is pastor of Holy Trinity 
Church, in Jay county, since 1906. 



THE REV. ALOYSIUS KURTZ, O. F. M. 

He was born at Laar, diocese of Limburg, Germany, on 
June 7, 1850; emigrated to America, in 1853; ordained priest, 
at Detroit, Michigan, on August 25, 1872; attended the mission 
Frankfort, from August 1896 till August 1898, residing at 
Lafayette. 



THE REV. FRANCIS X. LABONTE. 

He was born at Benson, Vermont, in the diocese of Bur- 
lington, on January 30, 1868. His studies were made at 
L' Assumption, Montreal, Canada, and at Baltimore, Maryland. 



The Clergy, Continued. 137 

He was ordained priest by Bishop. Rademacher, in the Cathe- 
dral at Fort Wayne, on May 19, 1894. He was pastor of St. 
Louis' Church at Besancon until January 1902. He then 
labored in the diocese of Hartford, Connecticut until his return 
to Fort Wayne, on April 7, 1905, when he was appointed 
assistant at St. Vincent's Church, Elkhart. He was pastor of 
St. Patrick's Church at Oxford from October 30, 1906, till 
March 21, 1907, when he departed this life in St. Elisabeth's 
Hospital at Lafayette. After a solemn Requiem Mass in St. 
Mary's Church at Lafayette, the remains were taken to Stafford 
Springs, Connecticut, for burial. 



THE REV. ALBERT E. LAFONTAINE. 

He was born in Montreal, Canada, on April 7, 1868. He 
received his elementary education in the schools of that city; 
took a commercial course at Varennes College; studied classics 
at L' Assumption; began the study of theology at Brignole Sale 
College, Genoa, Italy, in 1887 and was ordained priest there, 
on June 11, 1892, for the foreign missions. In that same year, 
he came to Toronto, Canada, where he did missionary work 
among the Italians and conducted night schools. After a 
short while, he was appointed superintendent of the Blantyre 
Industrial School and was also given charge of the parish at 
East Toronto. He did missionary work also in the Niagara 
Peninsular. In 1896, he came to Fort Wayne in delicate 
health and was assistant at the Cathedral in Fort Wayne, until 
July 1897, when he was sent to St. Vincent's. On July 9, 1901, 
he was appointed Superintendent of Parochial Schools for the 
diocese of Fort Wayne, a position which he was the first to 
occupy. He is still active in that same field of labor. 



THE REV. SIMON P. LALUMIERE. 

He was born at Vincennes, Indiana, in 1804; ordained 
priest by Bishop Flaget, the first priest ordained for Vincennes; 
his name appears on the baptismal records of the Cathedral at 
Fort Wayne, from May 31st, to June 7, 1835; he visited Lafay- 
ette from Terre Haute about the year 1841. He died at Terre 
Haute, June 9, 1857. 



138 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. FRANCIS J. LAMBERT. 

He was born at Wilting, the diocese of Treves, Germany, 
on February 13, 1857. He received his elementary education 
at the schools of his native town. He visited the Gymnasium 
at Treves, where he spent seven years, after which he entered 
the Jesuit College at Tournhout, Belgium, and remained one 
year. His philosophical and theological courses were made in 
the American College, Louvain, from 1879 until March 10, 1883, 
the date on which he was ordained priest by Bishop Adames, 
for the diocese of Fort Wayne. He left his native country on 
April 21, 1883, and arrived at Fort Wayne on May 4th. His 
appointments were: Pastor of Nix Settlement and Roanoke, 
from May 4, 1883 till June 15, 1884; pastor at St. Anthonyjs, 
Benton county, from June 15, 1884 till May 15, 1888; pastor 
at Dunnington since May 15, 1888. 



THE REV. LAWRENCE LAMOOR. 

He was born at Schalladuebach, Bavaria, diocese of Spire, 
Germany, on August 30, 1840. He emigrated to this country 
in 1850 and was ordained priest, on May 17, 1865. His name 
appears on the baptismal records of the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, on July 16, 1865. He was the assistant to Rev. B. 
Kroeger at Peru in 1865 and attended to Tipton as a mission. 
From 1867 till 1870, he was the pastor of Union City, attending 
to Kokomo and Dunkirk as missions. He also visited Hart- 
ford City and Montpelier sometime between the years of 1856 
and 1883. He was the pastor of St. Charles' Church at Peru, 
from 1872 to September 1875. Later he entered the Benedic- 
tine Order in Manchester, New Hampshire. 



THE REV. JOHN F. LANG. 

He was born February 15, 1848, in Delphos, Ohio. He 
studied the classics in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, philosophy, with the Sulpicians at Montreal, Canada, 
theology in Cleveland, Ohio, and St. Francis, Wisconsin. He 



The Clergy, Continued. 139 

was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger in Fort Wayne, on 
February 20, 1875. His appointments were the following: 
Pastor of St. Patrick's Church, Chesterton, from March 1875 
till October 1877; pastor of St. Patrick's Church, Oxford, from 
October 1877 till April 1882; secretary of Bishop Dwenger and 
Chancellor of the diocese, from 1882 till 1892. At the present 
time, he is pastor at Lowell, Ohio, in the diocese of Columbus. 



THE REV. GEORGE LAUER. 

He was born on August 24, 1872, at Fort Wayne, Indiana. 
He made his studies at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, and Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained 
priest, by Bishop Rademacher, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, 
on June 30, 1896. The first eighteen months of his ministry 
were spent consecutively at Goshen, Earl Park, Laporte and 
Rome City, after which he spent an additional eighteen months 
in charge of Ligonier and Kendallville. He was assistant at 
St. Joseph's Church, Hammond, for a short time, and since 
March 1899 is the pastor of St. Mary's Congregation, East 
Chicago. 



THE REV. JACOB LAUTH, C. S. C 

He was born at Bous, diocese of Luxemburg, April 16, 
1845; emigrated to America, April 16, 1863; received the habit, 
August 24, 1867; profession, August 30, 1868; ordained priest 
at Notre Dame, November 11, 1870. He was the pastor at 
St. Vincent, Allen county, in the year 1895. 



THE REV. JOHN LAUTH, C. S. C 

He was born at Bous, diocese of Luxemburg, January 1, 
1841; came to America in 1858; received the habit, August 24, 
1867; profession, August 30, 1868; ordained priest, November 
11, 1870. He was pastor of St. Patrick's Church, South Bend, 
during the year 1875; pastor of St. Vincent, Allen county, from 
1888 to 1890. 



140 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. PETER LAUTH, C. S. C 

He was born at Bous diocese of Luxemburg, May 24, 
1834; came to America, May 19, 1854; received the habit, 
August 15, 1864; profession, September 9, 1866; ordained 
priest, at Notre Dame, March 7, 1869. He was the pastor of 
St. Joseph's Church, at South Bend, from January 1873 till 
September 1874, and again, from September 1875 till 1876. 
He was pastor of St. Patrick's Church at South Bend, from 1876 
till August 1880. He has been pastor of St. Joseph's Church 
at South Bend, since April 5, 1902. 



THE REV. ALPHONSE LAUX, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Stolsenberg, Luxemburg, on September 
11, 1835. He was received into the Community of the Most 
Precious Blood, on July 17, 1858, was ordained priest by 
Archbishop Purcell of Cincinnati, on November 7, 1861. He 
was the chaplain of the Kneipp Sanitarium, from March 1903 
till September 1906. He departed this life in St. Francis' 
Hospital, Cincinnati, on February 28, 1907. 



THE REV. AUGUSTINE LEMONNIER, C. S. C. 

He was born April 25, 1839. He was one of the pastors 
of St. Joseph's Church at South Bend, attending the same 
from Notre Dame, prior to 1869. He died on October 29, 
1874, and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. CHARLES LEMPER. 

He was born at Glandorf, Ohio, on August 3, 1854. He 
was ordained priest in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, by Bishop 
Dwenger, on May 22, 1880. He was pastor of Attica, from 
1880 till 1898, also attending to Covington, as a mission, during 
the time it had no resident pastor. He was transferred to St. 



The Clergy, Continued. 141 

Michael's Church, Plymouth, where he remained until the date 
of his death, December 13, 1900. 'His remains rest in the ceme- 
tery at Plymouth. 



THE REV. F. G. LENTZ. 

He was horn at Cumberland, Maryland, in 1846. He was 
educated at Bardstown, Kentucky, and Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, Cincinnati, and was ordained priest by Bishop 
Dwenger, on July 6, 1876. He was immediately sent to Tipton, 
as its first resident pastor. Here he remained until June 5, 
1890, when he was appointed pastor at Covington. 



THE REV. LOUIS J. L'ETOURNEAU, C. S. C 

He was born at Detroit, Michigan, on October 3, 1828; 
received the habit, June 1854; profession. May 1, 1856; ordained 
priest, by Bishop Henni, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 
20, 1857. He was one of the pastors of St. Joseph's Church 
at South Bend, attending the same from Notre Dame, prior to 
1869, and again, from September 1874 till September 1875. 
At present he is at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. ZEPHIRINUS LEVEQUE, C. S. C. 

He was born at La Riviere, Canada, January 10, 1806; 
received the habit, November 1, 1856; profession, December 
25, 1857. He was one of the pastors of St. Joseph's Church 
at South Bend, attending the same from Notre Dame prior to 
1869. He died February 13, 1862, and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. EDMUND ALOYSIUS LEY. 

He was born at Landeck, Ohio, on May 24, 1875. He 
made his classical studies at St. Joseph's College, near Rens- 
selaer, and his philosophical and theological studies at Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained 



142 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

priest in the chapel of the Episcopal Residence, at Fort Wayne, 
on December 22, 1905, by Bishop Alerding; since which time 
he has been the assistant at St. Mary's Church, Anderson. 



THE REV. LEOPOLD LINDER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Donzdorf, diocese of Rottenburg, Ger- 
many, January 10, 1863, came to America, October 16, 1885; 
ordained priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, June 21, 1891. He was 
the pastor of St. Peter's Church, at Winamac, from 1898 till 
1903. 



THE REV. ATHANASIUS LINGEMANN, O. F. M. 

He was born August 14, 1853; entered the Order, August 
25, 1874; ordained priest, June 15, 1878; assistant at St. Boni- 
face's Church, Lafayette, from August 1879, to June 1881; 
died at Wichita, Kansas, June 23, 1895. 



THE REV. FRANCIS LORDEMANN. 

He was born in Darfeld, diocese of Munster, Germany, 
on January 15, 1850. He received his elementary education 
and made the classical course in his native country. Having 
emigrated to America in 1869, he entered St. Francis' Semi- 
nary at Milwaukee, where he completed his studies. He was 
ordained priest in Fort Wayne, by Bishop Dwenger, on Septem- 
ber 20, 1873. His first and present appointment is that of 
pastor of St. Patrick's Church at Kokomo, from which place 
he also attended to Tipton as a mission. From 1874 till 1888 
he attended Frankfort as a mission once a month. 



THE REV. FRANCIS DE PAUL LOTZ, O. F. M. 

He was born June 6, 1867; entered the Order, August 30, 
1885; ordained priest, December 17, 1872; pastor in Lafayette, 
from September 1900 to September 1903, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



The Clergy, Continued. 143 

THE REV. MICHAEL P. LOUEN. 

He was born January 16, 1870, in Chicago, Illinois. He 
made his classical and philosophical studies in France, and his 
theological studies at St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. He was ordained priest in Milwaukee, by Archbishop 
Katzer, on May 28, 1899. His appointments were: Assistant 
at St. Joseph's Church, Mishawaka till July 9, 1901; pastor 
pro tern, at St. Mary's Church, Huntington; pastor at St. 
Vincent, Allen county, and Leo, from September 1901 till 
January 1, 1907; pastor at Fowler since January 1, 1907. 



THE REV. JOSEPH A. LYNN. 

He was born December 14, 1875, in Murnelles, County 
Tirone, Archdiocese of Armagh, Ireland. He studied the 
classics, philosophy and one year theology in St. Viateur's 
College, Kankakee, Illinois, and completed his theology in 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was or- 
dained priest, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, by Bishop 
Alerding, on June 17, 1905. He was assistant priest at St. 
Mary's Church, Lafayette, until February 6, 1906. He was 
given the privilege to visit his native country and upon his 
return, since June 24, 1906, he has been the assistant at St. 
Charles' Church, at Peru. 



THE REV. CHARLES E. McCABE. 

He was born in Peru, Indiana, on November 14, 1875. He 
made his classical studies at St. Viateur's College, Kankakee, 
Illinois. He studied philosophy and theology in Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest 
by Archbishop Elder, in the chapel of the Seminary, on June 
16, 1899. He was assigned as assistant to St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, from June 23, 1899 till July 10, 1901. He was 
pastor of St. Bridget's, in Benton county, and the mission 
Otterbein, from July 10, 1901 till January 4, 1906, when he 
received his present appointment; pastor of St. Genevieve's 



144 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Church, at Gas City and chaplain of St. Ignatius' Chapel of 
the Marion Branch National Home for Disabled Volunteer 
Soldiers. 



THE REV. MEINRAD McCARTHY, O. S. B. 

He was born at Monmouthshire, Ireland, February 9, 
1839; ordained priest, January 20, 1869. He was the resident 
pastor of Oxford, from October 1875 till October 1877, attend- 
ing to the missions Fowler, Dunnington and Barrydale. 



THE REV. PATRICK McDERMOTT. 

He was born on March 17, 1820, at El Fin, County of 
Roscommon, Ireland. His father was a well-to-do farmer. 
He graduated in 1843, at the College of Maynooth. His 
brother, the Rev. John McDermott, laboring in the missions 
of Indiana, induced him to emigrate. He was ordained priest 
on December 21, 1843, by Bishop de la Hailandiere. In 1847, 
he was assigned to Lagro, attending also Huntington. In 
1848, he was given Logansport and Peru, where he remained 
until December 1852. From here he also attended to the 
stations Pulaski and Indian Creek, from 1848 till 1850. He 
had attracted attention in the wilds of the North and was 
called to Evansville to assist Rev. Anthony Deydier. He 
remained in the diocese of Vincennes, dying at Indianapolis, 
on September 13, 1882. His body now rests in the St. Joseph's 
cemetery at Indianapolis. 



THE REV. MOSES A. McGARRY, C. S. C, D. D. 

He was born on February 25, 1846, in Inverness County 
Cape Breton, N. S. He came to the United States when a boy. 
In 1869 he was sent from Boston to Montreal to complete his 
classical and philosophical studies. He entered the Congre- 
gation of Holy Cross in 1872, and took the vows on December 
25, 1873. Having completed the study of theology, he was 



The Clergy, Continued. 145 

ordained a priest by the Most Rev. Charles Edward Fabre, 
Archbishop of Montreal, on September 21, 1875. After his 
ordination he was professor in the classical course till 1895, in 
which year he was made the president of his Alma Mater. 
He held this position for nine years, when he taught moral 
theology during two years, at Holy Cross College, Washington 
D. C. Since August 1906 he has been the rector of the Sacred 
Heart Church, at Notre Dame, Indiana, 



THE REV. JOHN McMAHON. 

He visited Delphi, Reynolds, Francisville, Medaryville 
and Anderson, from Lafayette in 1860. He had charge of St. 
Mary's Church at Union City, from 1862 till 1867. He died at 
Reynolds, on May 28, 1872. His remains rest at Lafayette. 



THE REV. ALOYSIUS MALIN, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Mauren, diocese of Brixen, May 10, 1853; 
came to America, October 16, 1865, ordained priest at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, June 24, 1876. He attended the mission Port- 
land on two Sundays of every month, from December 1878 till 
May 1882. 



THE REV. ROMAN A. MARCINIAK, C. S. C. 

He was born in New York City, on July 17, 1873. He 
attended the parochial school of St. Hedwig's, at South Bend. 
Having completed the course of studies at Notre Dame, he 
entered the Community of the Holy Cross in 1893. In the 
Catholic University at Washington, he made his philosophical 
and theological studies. On September 8, 1897, Bishop Rade- 
macher ordained him priest ,at Notre Dame. He was appointed 
assistant at St. Hedwig's Church, South Bend, where he re- 
mained one year. During two years after this, he was stationed 
at Holy Trinity Church, at Chicago, as assistant. In 1900 he 
was appointed pastor of St. Stanislaus' Church, at South Bend, 
which position he holds at the present time. 



146 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOHN A. MARK. 

He was born at Acholshausen, near Wuerzburg, Bavaria, 
Germany, on April 1, 1820. He studied the classics in his 
native place, philosophy at the University of Wuerzburg, 
theology in that same University, and also in All Hallows' 
College, Archdiocese of Dublin, and in the Diocesan Seminary 
of Halifax. He was ordained priest, on August 6, 1852, by 
Archbishop Walsh, of Halifax, where he labored until the year 
1860, when Bishop Yuncker received him into the diocese of 
Alton. Bishop Dwenger accepted him for the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, in 1876. His appointments were: Pastor of Attica, 
with Covington as a mission, from 1876 till 1880; pastor of 
Hesse Cassel, from 1880 till 1897, when he resigned on account 
of his advanced age and accepted the position of chaplain in 
St. Joseph's Hospital, at Logansport. Here he died November 
20, 1904. 



THE RT. REV. AUGUST MARY MARTIN, D. D. 

He was born, February 2, 1803, at Breton, St. Malo, 
diocese of Rennes, France; ordained by Bishop Segney of 
Rennes, in 1828. He was pastor of St. Vincent de Paul's 
Church, Logansport, from 1841 to 1844. He visited Lafayette 
from Logansport occasionally about 1841. He was consecrated 
Bishop of Natchitoches, Louisiana, in the Cathedral at New 
Orleans, by Archbishop Blanc, assisted by Bishops Portier and 
Van de Velde, on November 30, 1853. He died at Natchi- 
toches, September 29, 1875. 



THE REV. CONSTANTINE MAUJAY. 

He was born June 14, 1849, in Angers, France, where he 
also made all his studies. As Deacon, he came to America 
and was ordained priest on January 1, 1872, at Wheeling, 
West Virginia, by Bishop Whelan. In April 1873, he came to 
the diocese of Fort Wayne and was appointed pastor of St. 
Vincent's, Allen county. In 1876, he was made pastor of St. 



■ The Clergy, Continued. 147 

Louis' Church, at Besancon and remained for two years. He 
was assistant at Avilla and at St". Mary's Church, Lafayette. 
From the latter place he was sent to Fowler, where he remained, 
from June 1882 to May 1889, attending also Earl Park. In 
1889, he went to the diocese of Concordia, Kansas, but returned 
to Fort Wayne in 1894, and was appointed pastor of Portland, 
with Albany, Geneva, Red Key and Ridgeville as missions. 
Owing to defective eye-sight, he resigned in 1901 and entered 
the convent of the Fathers of Mercy in Brooklyn, New York. 
He returned, however, to the diocese of Fort Wayne and was 
chaplain for a short time at the Kneipp Sanitarium, Rome 
City. He died at St. Francis' Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, on 
February 1, 1906. His remains rest in the cemetery at Cin- 
cinnati. 



THE REV. DOMINIC MEIER, O. F. M. 

He was born at Covington, Kentucky, September 2, 1851; 
ordained priest, at Louisville, Kentucky, December 19, 1874. 
He attended Attica, from May 1875 till April 1876, residing 
at Lafayette. He also had charge of Reynolds in 1876. At 
present he is pastor of St. Anthony's Church, Streator, Illinois. 



THE REV. A. M. MEILI. 

He was born at Zurich, diocese of Chur, Switzerland, on 
March 8, 1840. He was ordained priest, on February 27, 1870. 
He was assistant priest at St. Joseph's Church, Logansport 
until 1872. He also attended Monroeville sometime between 
the years 1872 and 1884. Later he was a priest of the Kansas 
City, Kansas, diocese. 



THE REV. HENRY MEISSNER. 

He was born in Munster, Westphalia, Germany, on Decem- 
ber 3, 1842. Having made his classical course in the Govern- 
ment College, at Munster, and one year of philosophy and 



14S The Diocese oj Fort Wayne. 

theology in the University of the same place, he emigrated to 
America, where he landed. November 6, 1866. He entered the 
Sulpician Seminarv, Baltimore, and was ordained priest, on 
June 30, 1868. His first appointment was that of assistant at 
A%illa. On September 13th, of the same year, he was sent to 
Goshen and from there to Crovsn Point, where he remained for 
five vears. From here he attended to Dyer as a mission, from 
September to December 1871. He had charge of Schererville, 
from 1874 until September 13, 1875, when he took charge of 
St. Charles' Church at Peru. He \isited England, Ireland, 
France, Germany, Holland and Italy in 1884. Whilst in Rome, 
he had an audience with Pope Leo XIII, who authorized him 
to give the ApostoHc Benediction to his congregation. He 
departed this life on July 2nd, and was buried July 4, 1902, in 
St. Charles' Cemetery, Peru. 



THE RE\'. ANTHONY MESS.MANN. 

He was bom on December 11, 1839, in Steinfeld, Olden- 
burg, diocese of Munster, Germany. At the age of twenty, 
he emigrated to .America. Ha\ing completed the fourth year 
of his classical course. Bishop Luers adopted him for the 
diocese of Fort Wayne, and in 1866 sent him to Notre Dame 
University for the study of philosophy. In 1867, he was sent 
to .Mount St. Mary's of the West, Cincinnati, Ohio, for the study 
of theolog}'. Bishop Luers ordained him priest, on January 6, 
1870, in St. John's Church, Cincinnati. He was assistant at 
St. \'incent's Church, Logansport, from January 22, till April 
3, 1870. His other appointments are the following: He was 
pastor at Kentland, from .\pril 1870 to December 1880. While 
residing at Kentland, he also attended to Remington, Earl 
Park, St. Anthony's, and Goodland. He was pastor of St. 
Peter's Church, Fort Wayne, from December 1880 to July 
1896; and pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Laporte, since July 
9, 1896. 



The CUrzy, Coniinmd. 149 

THE REW CHARLES MEYER. C. PP. S. 

He was bom at Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 25, 1856 ; ordained 
priest at Cincinnati, May 30, 1885. He was pastor pro tern, at 
Kentland sometime between December 10, 1902, and Februan.- 
13, 1903. 



THE RE\'. J. THOMAS MEYER, C. PP. S. 

He was bom at Minster, Ohio, July 25. 1569. He spent 
about ten years in St. Charles' Seminar}', at Carthagena. Ohio. 
He joined the C. PP. S. and was ordained priest, on April 26, 
1895. His first appointment was at Reed, Seneca county, 
Ohio, from May 10, 1895 till March 10, 1896; after which he 
was sent to Sedalia, Missouri, where he had charge of five 
missions. In September 1899 he was sent to Rensselaer, 
Indiana. 



THE REW JULIAN MEYER. C. PP. S. 

He was bom August 2S. 1S7S. at Weingarten. Wuertem- 
berg, Germanv; entered the Congregation of the Most Precious 
Blood. .August 15, 1891; ordained priest at Carthagena. Ohio, 
by Bishop Moeller of Columbus. December 17, 1902. He was 
the pastor of Pulaski for six weeks, in October and November 
of 1903. 



THE REW WILLIAM CASPAR MILLER. 

The son of William M. and Mar>- J. (.Ackermann") Miller, 
was bom at Lafayette. Indiana, on Januar\- 16. 1S69. to which 
place his parents had moved from St. Joseph's Parish. Qn- 
cinnati. Ohio, in the wake of Bishop Luers. who had been 
consecrated for the diocese of Fort Wa\ne. Thev became 



150 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

pioneer members of St. Boniface's Church, at Lafayette. Young 
Miller attended St. Boniface's school until his thirteenth year 
of age. Evidences to the vocation of priesthood manifested 
themselves and with the accomplishment of this end in view, 
he entered St. Francis' Gymnasium, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
later St. Gregory Preparatory Seminary, Cedar Point, Ohio, 
where he completed his classical course. His philosophical and 
theological courses were made at Mount St. Mary's of the West 
Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Alerding, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, on May 24, 1902. 
After his ordination, he enjoyed the privilege of an European 
trip, visiting Rome, and having audiences with Pope Leo XIII, 
on August 2nd, and 7th. During the illness of Rev. Dominic 
Duehmig, he had charge of the parish at Avilla, where he 
remained from October 1, 1902 to February 1, 1903. He was 
then made assistant to Rev. John Bleckmann, pastor of St. 
Mary's Church, Michigan City. On August 28, 1906, he was 
transferred to the Bishop's House in Fort Wayne, where his 
time is divided between the work of an assistant at the Cathedral 
and of clerical work under the Bishop's direction. 



THE REV. WILLIAM CONRAD MILLER. 

He was born in Heimersheim, diocese of Treves, Germany, 
on July 11, 1857. He studied the classics at the Gymnasium 
of his native country, emigrating to the United States, in Decem- 
ber 1877. Having made his philosophical and theological 
studies at Mount St Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
partly at St. Meinrad's Seminary, Indiana, he was ordained 
priest, in Fort Wayne, by Bishop Dwenger, on September 24, 
1881. His appointments were: Pastor of Nix Settlement and 
its mission Roanoke, from October 1881 till March 31, 1883; 
pastor of Kentland, from March 31, 1883 till September 1891, 
attending Goodland as a mission, from 1883 till 1888; pastor 
of Areola and its mission, Pierceton, from 1891 till 1895; 
pastor of Oxford and its mission Barrydale, from June 1895 
till July 1901; pastor of Oxford without mission, from July 
1901 till October 6, 1906; irremovable rector of SS. Peter and 
Paul's Church, Huntington, since October 6, 1906. 



The Clergy, Continued. 151 

THE REV. J. OTTO M4SLER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Bellevue, Ohio, March 13, 1857; ordained 
priest at Carthagena, Ohio, June 8, 1882. He attended Port- 
land, as a mission, on two Sundays of every month, from 
February till November 1885. He was pastor of St. Peter's 
Church, Winamac, from 1887 till 1897. 



THE REV. LOUIS A. MOENCH. 

He was born, on January 25, 1853, in Freudenberg, Baden, 
Archdiocese of Freiburg, Germany. He came to America in 
1867 and resided with Father Duehmig at Avilla, until he 
entered St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where 
he completed his studies. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Dwenger, June 10, 1876 and was sent to Avilla as assistant, 
until April 1879, attending also the neighboring missions. 
After this, he was assistant at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, for 
eight months. He was pastor of Lebanon, with its missions, 
from November 1879 to January 1, 1882. He was assistant 
at St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, until February 6, 1883. 
From that date until July 26, 1898, he was pastor of St. Michael's 
Church, Plymouth. Having been pastor of St. Paul's Church, 
Valparaiso, from July 26, 1898, till February 1903, he was 
appointed the Vicarius, and on June 29th, of the same year, 
irremovable rector of St. Joseph's Church, Mishawaka. He is 
a member of the Diocesan Building Committee, and School 
Board, 



THE REV. LEO MOLENGRAFT, O. F. M. 

He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 7, 1862; 
ordained priest, at Cincinnati, January 6, 1888. He attended 
the station, Frankfort from Lafayette, from 1888 to 1890. 



THE REV. DENIS J. MULCAHY. 

He was born on May 7, 1860, in Greenock, Archdiocese 
of Glasgow, Scotland. In 1863, his parents emigrated to the 
United States and located in Cleveland, Ohio, where he received 



152 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. ■ 

his elementary education in the parochial school. His classical 
studies were made in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, as well as, his philosophy, completing his theology in 
the Salesianum at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, until March 8, 1884, 
when he was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in Fort 
Wayne. His appointments were: Assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, Lafayette, from March 19, 1884 to August 20th, of 
the same year; pastor of Lebanon and missions, from August 
20, 1884 to October 22, 1886; pastor of Grass Creek and 
Lucerne, from November 1, 1886 to May 1, 1891; pastor of 
St. Mary's Church, Anderson, since May 7, 1891. He is a 
member of the Diocesan Building Committee. 



THE REV. EDWARD J. MUNGOVAN. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, on December 19, 
1876. He studied the classics in St. Joseph's College, .near 
Rensselaer, philosophy and theology in Mount St. Mary's 
Seminary, at Cincinnati. He was ordained priest, in the 
Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 24, 1902 by Bishop Alerding. 
His first appointment was that of assistant in St. Patrick's 
Church at Fort Wayne. Since June 8, 1907, he is the pastor 
of Areola and its mission, Pierceton. 



THE REV. THOMAS A. MUNGOVAN. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, on June 13, 1874. 
Having attended the parochial school of his native parish, he 
entered St. Vincent's College, West Moreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, for the study of the classics. He began and completed 
philosophy and theology in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati, and was ordained priest, for the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
by Archbishop Elder, in the Seminary Chapel, on June 16, 
1899. He was assistant at St. Patrick's Church, Fort Wayne, 
till May 24, 1902, when he was appointed the first pastor of a 
congregation to be organized in Indiana Harbor. He is still 
the pastor of St. Patrick's Church of that place. 



The Clergy, Continued. 153 

THE REV. ALPHONSE MUNSCHINA. 

He was born at Strassburg, France, on May 16, 1815; 
came to America in 1839; ordained priest, February 19, 1843. 
He was assistant to Father Benoit at St. Augustine's Ciiurch, 
Fort Wayne, his name appearing on the records of the Cathedral 
from December 15, 1844 to February 15, 1846. From here 
he attended to the CathoHcs in and about Avilla, at Decatur 
and Hesse Cassel. Later he labored in the diocese of Vincennes. 
He died November 2, 1898. 



THE REV. JOSEPH MUTCH. 

He was born at Michigan City, on June 13, 1880. He 
attended the parochial school of his native city; made his 
classics at St. Joseph's College, near Rensselaer; philosophy 
and theology at Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cedar Point, Ohio. 
Having completed his studies, he was ordained priest, by Bishop 
Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 22, 1906. 
He received the appointment of assistant at St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, on the day of his ordination. 



THE REV. JOHN A. NAGELEISEN, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Piqua, Ohio, August 27, 1861; ordained 
priest. May 30, 1885. He was the pastor of Holy Trinity 
Church, in Jay county, from 1888 till 1892, attending to Port- 
land as a mission, on two Sundays of every month, from 
March to July 1888. 



THE REV. STANISLAUS NEIBERG, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Loramie, Ohio, April 15, 1860; ordained 
priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, March 17, 1889. He was the pastor 
of St. Augustine's Church, Rensselaer, from July 1891 till 
September 1896. At the same time, he was a professor at St. 
Joseph's College. 



154 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. PIUS NIEHAUS, O. F. M. 

He was born November 26, 1853; entered the Order, 
August 25, 1869; ordained priest, December 20, 1876; assistant 
at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette, in August 1886; pastor 
of the same church, from September 1887 to August 1890; 
chaplain at St. Anthony's Home for the Aged, at Lafayette, 
since August 1906. 



THE REV. FRANCIS XAVIER NIGH. 

He was born at Gersau, Switzerland, diocese of Chur, on 
July 26, 1811. He was ordained priest, on October 2, 1834, 
and emigrated to the United States, on November 1, 1854. 
In the year 1855, he built a little frame church, about two 
and one-half miles north-west of Monterey, on the banks of 
the Tippecanoe river. He was the first resident pastor at 
Pulaski, from 1858 to 1862, residing with a private family and 
having Indian Creek, Winamac, Monterey, Turkey Creek, 
Crown Point, Klaasville and Kewanna in his charge. Later 
he bacame a priest of the diocese of Chicago. 



THE REV. FRANK NIGSCH, C. PP. S. 

He was born May 24, 1846, at Blons, a village near Feld- 
kirch, in Tyrol. He came to America, October 1866, made 
his studies at Carthagena, Ohio, and was ordained priest in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, January 25, 1872. Some of his first pastoral 
charges were, Cassella, Ohio, and Weston, Missouri. Later 
he was appointed pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Wapako- 
neta, Ohio. Then followed his pastorates of St. John's Church, 
Glandorf, and St. John's Church, Maria-Stein, Ohio. From 
the latter place, he was sent to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he 
labored, from October 12, 1897 till January 19, 1903, becoming 
the founder of the present flourishing Congregation of the Most 
Precious Blood. 



The Clergy, Continued. 155 

THE REV. CHRISTIAN NIGSH, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Feldkirch, Vorarlberg, diocese of Brixen, 
Germany, January 26, 1843; came to America, May 20, 1870; 
ordainfed priest, April 17, 1878. He was the pastor of St. 
Peter's Church, Winamac, from 1880 till 1885, attending 
Schimmels and Monterey for a time. 



THE REV. JOHN F. NOLL. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, on January 25, 1875, was 
educated at the Cathedral Brothers' School, until he was 
thirteen years of age, when he went to St. Lawrence's College, 
Mount Calvary, Wisconsin to study for the priesthood. After 
spending five years there, he went to Mount St. Mary's Semi- 
nary, Cincinnati, Ohio, for the study of philosophy and theology. 
He was ordained priest, by Bishop Rademacher. in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on June 4, 1898. His first appointment was 
that of assistant to Rev. Henry Boeckelmann, at Elkhart, then 
he was sent to assist Rev. B. Kroeger, at Logansport, from 
December 1898 to February 1899. From February 1899 to 
June 1902, he was the pastor of Ligonier and missions. In 
June 1902, Bishop Alerding transferred him to Besancon, where 
he labored until July 11, 1906, when he was sent to Hartford 
City, with Montpelier for a mission. The work of giving 
missions to non-Catholics was also entrusted to Father Noll, 
to engage in the same when time and circumstances permit. 
A pamphlet, entitled "Kind Words from Your Pastor," of 
which Father Noll is the author has won for itself a wide cir- 
culation, and is used especially for distribution at missions. 



THE REV. MARTIN F. NOLL. 

He was born, July 19, 1849, and studied the classics in 
St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Being too young 
for the seminary, he was the teacher and organist at Valparaiso 
for four years. Having completed his studies of philosophy 
and theology in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, 



156 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

he was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, in 1872. He had 
charge of Union City for three years, next he was transferred 
to Elkhart and Goshen, from 1875 till 1880. While pastor at 
Union City, he attended to Dunkirk as a station. In 1880, 
Bishop Dwenger appointed him pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, where he died on June 14, 1880. His remains rest 
in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. CHARLES NOTHEIS, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Berlin, Shelby county, Ohio, July 20,1866; 
entered the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood, May 14, 
1884; ordained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Archbishop Elder, 
June 21, 1893. He was pastor of St. Augustine's Church, 
Rensselaer, from June till September 1899. 



THE REV. LEONARD NURRE, O. F. M. 

He was born J anuary 7, 1 854 ; entered the Order, September 
8, 1870; ordained priest, December 8, 1876; assistant in Lafay- 
ette, from April 1877 to August 1879; pastor, since September 
1903, at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette. 



THE REV. JOSEPH NUSSBAUM. 

He was born at Rimbach, Saxony, diocese of Paderborn, 
September 30, 1832. He was ordained priest at Paderborn, 
on April 5, 1859. He came to America, on January 23, 1869. 
He was the first resident pastor at Hesse Cassel, from 1873 to 
1877, having charge also of Sheldon as a mission. He was the 
pastor of St. Mary's Church, Decatur, from February 1877 
till July 20, 1880, when he succeeded Father Oechtering, as 
pastor of St. Joseph's Church, at Laporte. He departed this 
life at Laporte, on December 26, 1895. Father Nussbaum was 
a straight forward and outspoken man. He is buried at 
Laporte. 



The Clergy, Continued. 157 

THE REV. JOHN OBERHOLZ. 

He was born in Stappenburg, Archdiocese of Cologne, 
Germany, April 13, 1864. He studied the classics in Steele, 
Germany, and Berlin, Ontario, Canada, and at the latter place 
also philosophy. He made his theological studies, at Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and was ordained priest 
by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 
17, 1905. He received the appointment of assistant at St. 
Charles' Church, Peru, remaining till June 24, 1906, when he 
made a visit to Europe. He was the assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, Michigan City, from September 1, 1906, till June 8, 
1907, when he was made pastor of Wanatah and its mission, 
Schimmels. 



THE REV. AUGUST BERNARD OECHTERING. 

He was born in Rheine, diocese of Munster, Westphalia, 
on September 8, 1837, the youngest son of Gerhard H, and 
Teresa (Benningmeier) Oechtering. In 1858, he completed 
his collegiate studies in the college of Rheine and a few months 
after his graduation, July 30, 1858, emigrated to America. 
Bishop Luers sent him to Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, for his theological studies and on May 17, 1861, 
ordained him a priest in the Cathedral at Eort Wayne. His 
first appointment was that of pastor of Delphi and contiguous 
missions, from May 26, 1861, to December 22, 1865. In 1864, 
he accompanied Bishop Luers to Europe, where he spent six 
months. He was pastor of St. Mary's Church, Avilla, from 
December 22, 1865 till May 12, 1867, attending also to Ege as 
a mission. He was pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Mishawaka, 
from May 12, 1867 to the time of his death, which occurred in 
St. Joseph's Hospital, Fort Wayne, on December 27, 1898. 
He made a second trip to Europe, in 1875, visiting Rome, 
where he had an audience with Pius IX. He was a member 
of the Diocesan School Board. A man of heroic faith, strong 
physically as well as mentally. Father Oechtering labored 
unceasingly and unselfishly for the spiritual welfare of the flock 
committed to his care. In the hour of his death, his memory 



158 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

turned to his dear mother and his last request was, that, when 
dead, his body be robed in the alb made for him by his mother. 
Another request of his was, that no sermon be preached at his 
funeral and no monument be erected over his grave. His 
wish has been respected. 



THE REV. EDWARD O'FLAHERTY. 

He was the first resident pastor at Crawfordsville, from 
1856 till the date of his death, on August 8, 1864, at the age of 
forty-five years and seven months. His remains rest in the 
cemetery at Lafayette. 



THE REV. BEDE OLDEGEERING, O. P. M. 

He was born September 15, 1856; entered the Order, 
August 26, 1878; ordained priest, August 12, 1883; assistant 
in Lafayette, from May 1901 to November 1902, at St. Boni- 
face's Church. 



THE REV. THOMAS M. O'LEARY. 

He was the son of Thomas and Honora (Lawler) O'Leary. 
His father was a native of Ardfert, County Kerry, while his 
mother was born in the village of Banna, in the same county, 
Ireland. He was born, June 8, 1854, at Lafayette, Indiana. 
Upon the death of his mother, he was cared for by Father 
O'Reilly, of Valparaiso, until he entered Notre Dame Univer- 
sity, where he remained several years. His farther education 
and theological studies were made at St. Francis' Seminary, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and St. Meinrad's Abbey, in Spencer 
county, Indiana. On January 26, 1885, Bishop Rademacher 
of Nashville, Tennessee, ordained Father O'Leary priest at St. 
Mary's Church in Fort Wayne, at which time Monsignore 
Benoit's remains lay in state at the Cathedral. From the time 
of his ordination Father O'Leary was assistant at the Cathedral 
until he was appointed pastor of the new St. Patrick's Parish 



The Clergy, Continued. 159 

in Fort Wayne. He departed this life, on October 24, 1889, 
all too soon, being but a few months over thirty-five years of 
age at the time of his death. He was a priest of character, 
dignity and genuine ability. His remains rest in the cemetery 
at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. MICHAEL O'REILLY. 

He was the pastor of Valparaiso, from 1864 until August 
4, 1887, the date of his death. His remains rest in the cemetery 
at Valparaiso. 



THE REV. PETER J. O'REILLY. 

He was born at Rutland Center, Vermont, on April 25, 
1875. His classical studies were made at Seton Hall College, 
philosophy at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop Rademacher, in the 
Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on December 19, 1897. His appoint- 
ments were: Assistant at St. Mary's, Lafayette, until Septem- 
ber 1898; pastor of Frankfort, and missions, from September 
10, 1898 to June 1899; assistant at the Cathedral of Fort Wayne, 
from June 1899 to January 1902, when he left the diocese of 
Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. HENRY A. FAANAKKER, C. S. C. 

He was born in Harlem, Holland, on January 12, 1864; 
received the habit, August 15, 1894; professed August 15, 1896; 
ordained priest, by Bishop Rademacher, August 19, 1896. He 
was appointed pastor of the Belgian Catholics residing in South 
Bend, where he organized the Sacred Heart Congregation and 
Church in 1896. Owing to ill health and the hope of effecting 
his recovery, he was removed to Austin, Texas, where he died 
February 12, 1906. 



160 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. LOUIS RAPHAEL PAQUET. 

He was born April 24, 1865, at Quebec, Canada He 
made his studies at the Petit Seminaire de Quebec, Nicolet 
College and the Grand Seminaire de Montreal. He was ordained 
priest by Bishop Zardetti at St. Francis, Wisconsin, for the 
Archdiocese of New Orleans, in June 1893. Having been 
adopted in the diocese of Fort Wayne, he was given charge of 
St. Rose's Church, Monroeville, on January 8, 1896. He was 
pastor of Fairmount, from September 2, 1900 till January 1, 
1901; assistant at Muncie, from February 16th, till October 
1901; assistant at Anderson, from October 1901 till June 1902; 
pastor of Portland and missions, from July 1902 till February 
1904; assistant at St. Paul's Church, Fort Wayne, from March 
1905 till May 30, 1906; chaplain at St. Vincent's Orphan 
Asylum, residing at St. Paul's, from May 30, 1906, till April 
1, 1907, since which date he is the resident chaplain of the St. 
Vincent's Orphan Asylum. 



THE REV. BENJAMIN MARY PETIT. 

He was born in the year 1811, a native of Rennes, France. 
From his earliest years his piety and charity had been the joy 
of his mother and the edification of all. After distinguishing 
himself at the school of his native town, he applied himself to 
the study of law; being admitted to the bar, he practiced law 
for a year or two and towards the close of 1835, he felt him- 
self called to the life of a missionary. Bishop Brute of Vin- 
cennes visiting at Rennes met him and he at once communi- 
cated to the Bishop his resolution. In the summer of 1836 
he emigrated to America; and on October 14, 1837, was or- 
dained priest by Bishop Brute, sooner than he expected in 
consequence of the death of Father De Seille. Writing to his 
mother he says: "I am now a priest, and the hand which is 
writing to you has this day borne Jesus Christ. How can I 
express to you all I would wish to say, and yet how shall I 
not attempt to say something on a subject on which no tongue 
can adequately dwell? My hand is now consecrated to God; 
my voice has a power which God Himself obeys. How my 



The Clergy, Continued. 161 

lips trembled this morning at roy first Mass, when, at the 
Memento, I recommended you all to God! and tomorrow I 
shall do the same, and after tomorrow, and every day of my 
life. Within two days I start hence all alone on a journey of 
three hundred miles, and yet not alone, for I shall journey in 
company with my God, whom 1 shall carry on my bosom day 
and night, and shall convey with me the instruments of the 
Great Sacrifice, halting from time to time in the depth of the 
forest, and converting, the hut of some poor Catholic into the 
palace of the King of Glory. My heart is so light, so happy, 
so contented, that 1 am a wonder to myself. From Mass to 
Mass — to go forward even to heaven! You recollect that I 
often said I was born happy. I can say the same still. 1 had 
always desired a mission amongst the savages; there is but one 
such in Indiana, and it is 1, whom the Pottawottamies call 
their "father black robe." He accompanied the Indians ban- 
ished westward by the Government and on his return, died at 
St. Louis, February 10, 1839. His remains were brought to 
Notre Dame, by Father Sorin, in 1856. 



THE REV. HENRY M. PLASTER. 

He is the son of Bernard and Catharine (Schmitz) Plaster, 
born in Dubuque, Iowa, on March 31, 1853. He entered St. 
Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, on February 1, 1873, and was 
ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, on December 12, 1879. He was the pastor of Attica, 
Covington and several missions and stations, until August 15, 
1885, since which time, he has been the pastor of St. Joseph's 
Church, Hammond. He was the first priest to celebrate Mass 
in East Chicago, in the Todd Opera House, in 1890. Father 
Plaster is a Diocesan Consultor. 



THE REV. ROBERT J. PRATT. 

He was born in Johnstown, Ohio, November 19, 1864, a 
son of Dr. B. W. and Jane M. (Bean) Pratt, natives of Vermont. 
On March 19, 1885, he was received into the Catholic Church 



162 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

by Rev. D. A. Clark at Columbus, Ohio. He made his classi- 
cal course at St. Charles' College, EUicott City, Maryland and 
at St. Viateur's College, Kankakee, Illinois. He studied phi- 
losophy and theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio and was ordained priest for the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
by Archbishop Elder of Cincinnati, on June 18, 1894. His 
appointments have been: Assistant at St. Mary's, Lafayette, 
from July 2, 1894 till June 28, 1895; pastor of St. Patrick's 
Church, Areola, from June 29, 1895 till January 30, 1900; 
pastor of St. Bernard's Church, Wabash, since January 30, 1900. 



THE REV. JOHN R. QUINLAN. 

He was born in Valparaiso, Indiana, on April 19, 1858. 
He made his studies in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and was ordained priest there, by Bishop Richter 
of Grand Rapids, Michigan, on June 22, 1890. His appoint- 
ments were: Assistant at the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, during 
seven years and seven months; pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Huntington, till March, 1901; pastor of the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, till May 16, 1901, since which time, he has been the 
pastor of St. Mary's Church, at Huntington. 



THE REV. WILLIAM J. QUINLAN. 

He was born in Syracuse, New York, on April 16, 1864. 
He studied the classics at Valparaiso and in St. Lawrence's 
College, Calvary, Wisconsin, and his philosophy and theology, 
in St. Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was 
ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, on June 29, 1888. He was pastor of Areola with 
Pierceton as a mission, till August 20, 1891; was assistant at 
the Cathedral in Fort Wayne, during which time he had charge 
of Besancon, till January 4, 1894, when he was made pastor 
of Marion. On April 14, 1906, he was transferred to St. Ber- 
nard's Church, Crawfordsville. 



The Clergy, Continued. 163 

THE REV. PETER JOSEPH QUINN. 

He was born at Gortinderragh, County Tyrone, Ireland, 
on June 29, 1866, a son of Michael and Margareth (McGladrigan) 
Quinn. He was one of nine children, one of these, John Quinn, 
is now Canon of a church in County Derry, and was private 
secretary to Cardinal Logue, during the conclave that elected 
Pius X. Father Quinn received his elementary education in 
his native parish. He studied the classics in St. Patrick's 
College, at Armagh. He emigrated to America, in 1888, where 
he entered St. Viateur's College, at Kankakee, Illinois. He 
was adopted into the diocese of Fort Wayne, in 1892, and was 
sent to Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, for the study 
of philosophy and theology. Archbishop Elder ordained him 
priest on June 18, 1897. He was the assistant to Rev. John 
R. Dinnen, pastor of St. Mary's at Lafayette, from July 1, 1897 
to January 1, 1898, when he was appointed pastor of St. 
Patrick's Church at Lagro. 



THE REV. BALTHASAR RACHOR. 

He was born at Zellhausen, diocese of Mentz, Germany, 
November 25, 1834; came to America in 1854; ordained priest. 
May 23, 1858. He was the pastor of St. John, from September 
1, 1858 till October 1866, when to recuperate his health, he 
made a trip to Europe and sojourned there for over two years; 
upon his return, he continued at St. John, from November 
1868 till October 1870. From here he also attended Klaasville 
as a mission, from 1863 till 1866. 



THE REV. ELIGIUS RACZYNSKI, C. S. C. 

He was born December 1, 1868, in Poland; received the 
habit, December 8, 1891; professed, January 3, 1894; ordained 
priest, at Fort Wayne, by Bishop Rademacher, January 6, 
1894. He was the pastor of St. Casimir's Church, South Bend, 
from April 11, 1899 till June 11, 1902, the date of his death. 



164 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. BENEDICT M. RAJCANY. 

He was born in Galgocz, Hungary, on February 2, 1869. 
He was ordained priest, as a member of the Franciscan Order, 
in Tirnau, by Bishop Balthizar, on January 23, 1892. At the 
invitation of Bishop Rademacher, he emigrated to the diocese 
of Fort Wayne, where he was appointed pastor of the St. John 
the Baptist's, Slavo Hungarian Congregation, in North Ham- 
mond, on April 17, 1897. He was secularized and received 
into the diocese of Fort Wayne, in December 1902. He also 
has charge of the mission of the Holy Trinity Church, in East 
Chicago. His services are much in demand by his countrymen 
in different places of this country. 



THE REV. URBAN RASZKIEWICZ. 

He was born in Szante, Lithuania, Russian Poland, on 
July 23, 1823. He made all his studies in Wladislaw, Poland, 
where he was ordained priest on September 8, 1848, a member 
of the Franciscan Order. From the time of his ordination till 
his emigration to the United States, he resided at different 
monasteries of his Order in Russian and Prussian Poland. He 
suffered much, even imprisonment, during the so called Kultur- 
kampf. Recommended by His Eminence Cardinal Ledechow- 
ski, and at the solicitation of Bishop Dwenger, he emigrated 
and came to the diocese of Fort Wayne, where he was appointed 
pastor of St. Mary's Church at Otis, in August 1881. In view 
of services rendered the diocese among its Polish population. 
Bishop Dwenger conferred upon him the title of "Dean of the 
Poles." Although advanced in years Father Raszkiewicz is 
still at his post. 



THE REV. AUGUST REICHERT, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Nersloch, Baden, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, February 22, 1 83 1 ; came to America in 1 834 ; ordained 
priest, November 21, 1853. When Bishop Dwenger gave the 
Congregation of the Most Precious Blood charge of Winamac, 



The Clergy, Continued. 165 

Father Reichert was sent there in 1873, but remained only a 
few months. During his stay at Winamac, he attended Pulaski 
and Indian Creek. 



THE REV. HENRY RENSON. 

He was born at Westerloh, Prussia, diocese of Osnabrueck, 
on March 28, 1807; ordained priest, June 6, 1836; came to 
America in 1848. He was the resident pastor of Klaasville, 
from 1866 till 1869. He succeeded the Rev. M. P. Wehrle in 
visiting Hanover Centre. He died in a hospital at Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 



THE REV. PAUL REUTER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Hohenroth, diocese of Wuerzburg, Ger- 
many, June 24, 1831; came to America, July 6, 1858; ordained 
priest, September 4, 1859. He was the pastor of Holy Trinity 
Church, in Jay county, from 1871 till 1876. Residing at St. 
Mary's Home, near New Corydon, he had charge of the mission, 
Portland, which he reached on horse-back and where he cele- 
brated Mass on week days, from the year 1873 till 1876. 



THE REV. JACOB RINGELE, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Doettingen, Switzerland, diocese of Solo- 
thurn, in 1806; ordained priest, December 21, 1842; came to 
America, December 31, 1843. He was the pastor of Holy 
Trinity Church, in Jay county, from 1866 till 1869. 



THE REV. BONNET ROCHE, C. S. C. 

He was born on January 6, 1832 at Aubait (Puy-de-Dome), 
France, he made his classical studies in the College at Rion, 
and his theological studies at the same place. Having entered 
the Congregation of the Holy Cross at Les Maus, he was ordained 



166 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

priest, on June 18, 1859. In 1860, he did missionary work in 
Eastern Bengal, India, and continued there for seventeen years. 
In 1877, he emigrated to Notre Dame, and shortly after, he 
took charge of St. Vincent de Paul's Church, in Allen county, 
from 1878 to 1888. He returned to India, and died at Solepore, 
on August 12, 1897, aged sixty-five years. 



THE REV. PATRICK F. ROCHE. 

He was born in Rochester, New York, March 15, 1852. 
He studied the classics at St. Charles, Maryland, philosophy 
and theology at St. Bonaventure's, Alleghany, New York. He 
was ordained priest, by Bishop Dwenger, in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on June 11, 1881. He was assistant at St. 
Mary's Church, Lafayette, from 1882 to 1884; pastor of Lagro 
and Andrews, from 1884 to August 24, 1888; pastor of St. 
Ann's Church, Lafayette, from 1888 to May 16, 1901, when 
he was appointed pastor of the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, where 
he is at present. 



THE REV. CHARLES M. ROMER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Nagenstadt, diocese of Rottenburg, Ger- 
many, June 9, 1856; came to America, April 2, 1875; ordained 
priest, by Bishop Dwenger in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, 
June 19, 1879. He was assistant at St. Mary's Church, Mich- 
igan City; assistant at St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne; pastor 
at St. Joseph's Church, Delphi, from January 1, 1892 to July 
17, 1901, when he became a member of the Congregation of 
the Most Precious Blood. 



THE REV. MICHAEL P. ROONEY, C. S. C. 

He was born at Albany, New York, January 8, 1830; 
received the habit, July 13, 1849; profession, August 15, 1852; 
ordained priest, by Bishop Van de Velde, at Notre Dame, on 
February 2, 1853. He was the first resident pastor at Laporte, 
from 1853 to 1854, from which place, he also attended Michigan 



The Clergy, Continued. 167 

City, where his name appears on the records, from January 
1853 to October 1854. He also attended St. John, from the 
beginning of 1857 till June of the same year. 



THE REV. PHILIP ROTHMANN, O. F. M. 

He was born September 18, 1856; entered the Order, 
August 25, 1872; ordained priest, November 7, 1879; assistant 
at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from August 1884 to 
August 1886. He was assistant priest at St. Joseph's Church, 
Hammond, till May 9th, and acting pastor till August 10, 1885. 



THE REV. JOSEPH RUDOLPH. 

He was born at Bottenheim, in Alsace, April 23, 1813; 
ordained priest, at Strassburg, on August 10, 1839; came to 
America, in 1842. His name appears on the baptismal records 
of the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, from July 1842 to October 
1844. He was assistant to Father Benoit, visiting the Catholics 
in and about Avilla and also Decatur. Later he labored in 
the diocese of Vincennes. He died May 29, 1866, and is buried 
at Oldenburg, Indiana, beneath the sanctuary of the church 



THE REV. ENGELBERT RUFF, C. PP. S. 

He was born at St. Maergen, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
October 5, 1817; came to America, February 2, 1845; ordained 
priest, at New Riegel, Ohio, March 4, 1848. He was the pastor 
of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay county, from 1864 to 1866. 



THE REV. STEPHEN SAILER, O. F. M. 

He was born at St. Jacob, Austria, March 29, 1828; entered 
the Order, September 6, 1853; ordained priest, July 26, 1857; 
came to America September 15, 1868; assistant at St. Boni- 
face's Church, Lafayette, from August 1872 to August 1873; 
returned to Europe in 1876; died at Salzburg, Austria, December 
19, 1899. 



168 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOHN SAND. 

He was born July 8, 1855 at Neerson, Archdiocese of 
Cologne, Germany. He made his studies at Neerson, Viersen, 
and Munich, and was ordained priest for the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, by Bishop Hoetzel, of Augsburg, in Munich, Germany, 
on July 19, 1898 and arrived at Fort Wayne, in December 
1898. He was assistant at St. Charles' Church, Peru, from 
December 25, 1898 to July 5, 1899, and assistant at St. Joseph's 
Church, Hammond, from July 6, 1899 to July 6, 1901. Owing 
to poor health necessitating a change of climate, the Bishop 
granted him leave of absence. He was made chaplain in St. 
Raphael's Hospital, St. Cloud, Minnesota, from July 12, 1901 
till February 1, 1902, since which date he has been pastor of 
Lastrup, in the diocese of St. Cloud, Minnesota. 



THE REV. MATTHIAS SASSE, O. F. M. 

He was born. May 28, 1859, in Haldern, Prussia; entered 
the Order, August 25, 1883; ordained priest, December 28, 
1892; assistant at St. Boniface's Church, Lafayette, from Jan- 
uary 1895 to November 19, 1895; he was the first pastor of 
St. Lawrence's Church, Lafayette, from November 19, 1895 to 
November 8, 1896. 



THE REV. FRANCIS S. SCHAEFER, O. F. M. 

He was born, at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 6, 1863; ordained 
priest, at Cincinnati, July 26, 1887. He attended St. Joseph's 
Church, at Reynolds till 1888. 



THE REV. HENRY VINCENT SCHAEFER. 

He was born at Waltrop, diocese of Munster, Germany, 
on March 11, 1833. Emigrating to this country in January 
1853, he was admitted to Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest, on June 27, 1858, and 
was made the first resident pastor of St. Mary's Church, Avilla, 



The Clergy, Continued. 169 

attending, from here, to Warsaw,. Ege, Goshen, Ligonier and 
Leo. About the year 1861, he made a pilgrimage to the Holy 
Land. In 1863, he was sent to Columbia City, having also Nix 
Settlement, Roanoke and Areola in his charge. Exposures to 
the inclemencies of the weather brought on consumption. The 
relief he sought at New Orleans was denied him and he died 
an edifying death on December 18, 1873. His remains were 
laid to rest in the cemetery back of St. Louis' Cathedral. 



THE REV. MAXIMILIAN SCHAEFER, O. E. M. 

He was born July 8, 1851; entered the Order, August 12, 
1869; ordained priest. May 14, 1874; assistant at St. Boniface's 
Church, Lafayette, from August 1874 to September 1875. 



THE REV. FREDERICK W. SCHAEPER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, March 15, 1865; 
ordained priest, at Rome, Italy, December 22, 1888. He was 
the pastor of Kewanna and the mission Lucerne, from July till 
the fall of 1893. 



THE REV. FRANCIS X. SCHALK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at New Riegel, Ohio, on March 29, 1859. 
He entered the community C. PP. S., September 3, 1873, and 
was ordained priest by Archbishop Elder, at Carthagena, Ohio, 
on June 8, 1882. He was sent to Sedalia, Missouri, with sur- 
rounding missions and stations, till 1886; was then on the 
missions in Kansas, till 1889; had charge of Glynnwood, Ohio, 
till 1891; labored in Tennessee, till 1894; was rector of St. 
Joseph's Indian and Normal School, at Rensselaer, till 1896; 
was pastor of St. Augustine's Church, Rensselaer, from Septem- 
ber 1896 till February 1897, then of Wheatfield and Lowell, 
till 1898; chaplain at the hospital of New Ulm, Minnesota, and 
served as substitute in many places, until October 1, 1905, 
when he was made the pastor of Pulaski, with Royal Centre 
for a mission. 



170 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. FREDERICK SCHALK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at New Riegel, Ohio, March 2, 1850; ordained 
priest, January 17, 1873. He and two other Fathers C. PP. S., 
were pastors pro tern, at Kentland, from December 10, 1902 
till February 13, 1903. He resides at the Mission House of 
the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood, Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. LEANDER SCHELL, O. F. M. 

He was born December 9, 1875; entered the Order, August 
15, 1893; ordained priest, August 12, 1900; assistant in Lafay- 
ette, from October 1902 to August 1906, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



THE REV. JOSEPH M. SCHERER, C. S. C. 

He was born on July 15, 1850 in Zunsweir, the Grand- 
Duchy of Baden, Germany. The family emigrated to America, 
in 1855, and settled first in Pennsylvania, then in Ohio, near 
Portsmouth. On January 9, 1873, Joseph entered the Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame, and on June 21, 1875 was received a 
member of the Congregation of the Holy Cross, making his 
profession, on June 23, 1876. He was ordained priest, on 
June 15, 1880, by Bishop Dwenger, at Notre Dame. He filled 
many important positions in the community to which he 
belongs, when being superior of the community house at Notre 
Dame, he was called to succeed Father Johannes as pastor of 
St. Mary's Church, at South Bend. He holds that position at 
the present time, since October 27, 1904. 



THE REV. KILIAN SCHILL, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Heuweiler, Archdiocese of Freiburg, Ger- 
many, July 8, 1854; came to this country, May 18, 1873; 
ordained priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, June 8/1882. He was 
the pastor of St. Peter's Church, at Winamac, from 1885 till 
1887. 



The Clergy, Continued. 171 

THE REV. A. SGHIPPERT. 

He was a native of the kingdom of Wuertemburg, and a 
convert from lutheranism. He was the first resident pastor of 
SS. Peter and Paul's Church, at Huntington, from March 1857 
till August 1858. He lived in a rented cottage on Cherry 
street. On account of ill health, he retired to Innsbruck, 
Tyrol, where, in a young ladies' academy, he filled the position 
of professor of the French language. While pastor of Hunt- 
ington he also attended Nix Settlement and Roanoke as mis- 
sions. 



THE REV. LAWRENCE J. SCHIRACK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at New Corydon, Indiana, February 26, 1863; 
ordained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 17, 1889. He has 
been the pastor of St. Peter's Church, Winamac, since the end 
of January 1905. 



THE REV. VALENTINE MICHAEL SCHIRACK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at St. Mary's Home, Jay county, Indiana, 
October 9, 1871 ; entered the Congregation of the Most Precious 
Blood, April 20, 1887; ordained priest, by Bishop Matz of 
Denver, Colorado, February 14, 1896. He was the pastor of 
St. Peter's Church at Winamac, from 1903 until November 15, 
1904, on which date he was almost instantly killed as a con- 
sequence of his horse becoming frightened by a passing hand- 
car, throwing him from the buggy. 



THE REV. RAPHAEL SCHMAUS, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Oberbaar, diocese of Augsburg, Germany, 
May 18, 1867; came to America, March 24, 1885; ordained 
priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, June 21, 1891. He was the pastor 
of Pulaski, from 1891 till 1893. 



172 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. WILLIAM GEORGE SCHMIDT. 

He was born at Lahr, in the province of Nassau, Germany, 
on February 5, 1852. Emigrating to this country in 1861, the 
family settled at Mineral Points, Wisconsin. Here he attended 
the parochial school, and then entered Calvary College, at Fond 
du Lac, Wisconsin. He then entered the St. Francis' Seminary 
at Milwaukee, where he studied three and one-half years: 
completing his theological studies at Mount St. Mary's Semi- 
nary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest by Bishop 
Dwenger in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on December 19, 
1874. He has had charge of St. Lawrence's Church at Muncie, 
since January 28, 1875. He is the dean of the Muncie district. 



THE REV. PETER SCHMITT. 

He was born on March 12, 1871, at Eschringen, Germany. 
He made his classical studies at Farbach, Lorain, and Pont-a- 
Moussen, France. His theological studies were made at the 
American College of Louvain, Belgium, where he was ordained 
priest, on June 29, 1897. On October 10th, of the same year, 
he was appointed the asisstant at St. Joseph's Church, Misha- 
waka, where he remained until May 1899. He was pastor of 
St. Michael's Church, Summit, till July 1900, when he was 
acting pastor at Plymouth, during Rev. Charles Lemper's 
illness. In March 1901, he was appointed pastor at Areola 
and Pierceton its mission, where he remained until September 
13, 1905 since which date he has been the pastor of Covington 
and the mission Veedersburg. 



THE REV. JOHN M. SCHMITZ. 

He was born, January 10, 1876, in the diocese of Treves, 
Germany. He studied the classics at St. Joseph's College, 
Kirkwood, Missouri, philosophy and theology, at Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained priest 
by Archbishop Elder, on June 16, 1899. His appointments 
have been: Assistant at Avilla, from July 2, 1899; assistant 



The Clergy, Continued. 173 

at Muncie, from September 1899; pastor at Auburn and mis- 
sions, since July 13, 1900. In 1906 Father Schmitz enjoyed a 
trip to Europe, having the privilege of an audience with Pope 
Pius X. 



THE REV. MATTHEW JACOB SCHMITZ. 

He was born at Siegburg, Prussia, diocese of Cologne, on 
December 14, 1831; ordained priest, April 21, 1857; came to 
America February 21, 1867. He was the first resident pastor 
at Dyer, from April 1867 till July 1870. From here he also 
attended to Lottaville. 



THE REV. CONRAD SCHNEIDER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Wolfsbach, Archdiocese of Bamberg, 
Germany, November 8, 1846; came to this country, on July 6, 
1869; ordained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 15, 1878. 
He visited Monterey some time between the years 1878 and 
II 



THE REV. THEOBALD SCHOCH, C PP. S. 

He was born in Mercer county, Ohio, July 24, 1848; or- 
dained priest, January 18, 1872. In the early part of 1876, 
he was the pastor of Pulaski; pastor of St. Peter's Church, 
Winamac, from the latter part of 1876 to 1880, also attending 
Monterey, as a mission. 



* THE REV. GEORGE M. SCHRAMM. 

He was born on Trinity Sunday, June 16, 1867, in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. From his fifth to his thirteenth year, he 
attended St. Mary's school and for some time also the Brothers' 
school, at the Cathedral. Having completed his sixteenth 
year, he entered St. Lawrence's College at Mount Calvary, 
Wisconsin, where he remained for five years. In September 



174 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1888, he was admitted to Mount St. Mary's of the West, Cin- 
cinnati, where he was given a two years course in philosophy 
and three years in theology. He was ordained priest, on May 
11, 1893, by Archbishop Elder. On June 8, of the same year, 
he was sent to Reynolds. At Francisville, one of the missions 
attached to Reynolds, was an epidemic of typhoid fever, and 
here he contracted the disease. He spent nearly nine months 
at St. Elisabeth's Hospital, at Lafayette. In the fall of 1896 
Bishop Rademacher sent him as an assistant to Rev. John 
Bleckmann, at Michigan City. During the absence of the 
pastor from March 1897 to July of the same year, he had 
charge of St. Joseph's Church at Hammond. He then returned 
to Michigan City, when on October 1, 1897 Bishop Rademacher 
made him pastor of St. Peter's Church at Laporte, which 
position he still holds. 



THE REV. JOHN BAPTIST SCHROEDER, O. F. M. 

He was born at Enochsburg, Indiana, October 9, 1852; 
ordained priest, at Detroit, Michigan, August 18, 1875. He 
was the pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Reynolds, in 1884. 
He attended to Remington, from 1881 to 1883. He died 
February 14, 1901. 



THE REV. ROCHUS SCHUELEY, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Schutterthal, Baden, Archdiocese of Frei- 
burg, Germany, on August 15, 1829; came to America, April 
25, 1848; ordained priest, at New Riegel, Ohio, November 21, 
1853. He was the pastor of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay 
county, from 1862 till 1864. 



THE REV. GAUDENTIUS SCHUSTER, O. F. M. 

He was born November 21, 1871; entered the Order, 
August 15, 1889; ordained priest, July 25, 1896; assistant in 
Lafayette, from October 1896 to August 1897, at St. Boniface's 
Church. 



The Clergy, Continued. 175 

THE REV. COSMAS SEEBERGER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Frastanz, Vorarlberg, diocese of Brixen, 
March 14, 1840; came to America, December 20, 1866; or- 
dained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 30, 1874. He was one 
of ten Fathers C. PP. S., who visited Monterey, from 1873 till 
1888. He was the pastor of Pulaski in 1875, and again, from 
1878 till 1880. He attended the mission, Portland, on two 
Sundays of every month, from January to December 1878. 
He was the resident pastor of Roanoke for eight months, from 
November 1880, visiting Nix Settlement every Sunday. 



THE REV. AUGUSTINE SEIFERT, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Tiffm, Ohio, April 28, 1857; ordained 
priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 11, 1881. He attended Port- 
land as a mission, on two Sundays of every month, from May 
to September 1882. At present he is the Rector of St. Joseph's 
College, near Rensselaer. 



THE REV. LOUIS DE SEILLE. 

He was a native of Belgium, a descendant of one of the 
oldest and wealthiest families of that Country, near Sleidinge. 
His missionary labors in Indiana date, from 1832 to 1837. His 
missions embraced portions of Indiana, Michigan and Illinois. 
To travel sixty or eighty miles to answer a sick call, was a 
common occurrence with him. Little is known as to particu- 
lars of his labors, but his death and its circumstances must be 
mentioned. He was visiting Pokegan, at a distance of about 
thirty-five miles from Notre Dame, for two weeks, when on 
leaving he told his dear Indians that they would not see him 
again. " I have a great journey to perform," he said to them, 
"pray for me and do not forget to say your beads for me". 



176 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Returning to Notre Dame, he sent messengers to Chicago and 
Logansport, a distance respectively of eighty-six and sixty-six 
miles, to have a priest come to attend him in his dying hour. 
After three days, the messenger returned without a priest. 
The house in which he lived was a log shanty divided into two 
parts, one of which served as a chapel, the other as a sleeping 
room. Father de Seille now requested to be carried into the 
adjoining chapel. Resting in the arms of his faithful Indians 
and having spent some time in prayer at the foot of the altar, 
he directed his attendant to vest him in surpHce and stole. 
They raised him gently and supported the dying priest, who 
with trembling hand opened the tabernacle and drew forth the 
ciborium. Having uncovered it, he humbly and devoutly 
administered to himself the Holy Viaticum. After spending a 
long time in thanksgiving he was carried back to the adjoining 
room, where in less than a half an hour, invoking the sweet 
names of Jesus and Mary, with a calm smile on his counte- 
nance, he expired without a struggle. The poor Indians at 
Pokegan, impressed with what their Black Gown had told 
them, that they would not see him again, set out for Notre 
Dame. When they arrived Father de Seille was no more. 
For three days they stood in mourning around the bed of death. 
They refused to bury the dead priest and did so only when 
ordered by the authorities of the neighboring town. The body 
was interred in the little chapel, but it and the bodies of two 
other missionaries now rest in a vault beneath the sanctuary 
of the present magnificent church. A cross was erected on 
the spot where the log cabin stood with the following inscrip- 
tion: "Hie praesens locus semel et iterum sanctificatus est 
oblatione divini sacraficii etiam per quosdam antecessorum 
nostrorum. Scimus procerto quod venerabilis de Seille rem 
sacram haberet aliquando in hoc humili suo cubiculo. Ibi 
moriens propriis manibus se communicavit in absentia alius 
sacerdotis quem in vanum desiderabat. Ibi mortuus et se- 
pultus piis amicis traditus est in humili capella quae postea 
labore et arte in hanc praesentem ecclesiam pulcherrimam 
mutata est ob quam causam haec loca quasi fundamenta 
Ecclesiae Nostrae Domini inservientia omni veneratione relig- 
iosa digna videntur." The memorial tablet in the wall of the 
church reads: 



The Clergy, Continued. 177 

Hie Jacent 

REV. F. COINT'ET, C. S. C. 

Dilectus Deo Et Hominibus. 

Sublatus Die 19 Mensis Septembris, 1854, 

Aetatis Suae 37 Anno. 

REV. J. DESEILLE OBITUS A.D. 1836. 

REV. B. PETIT OBITUS A.D. 1838. 

Viri Pariter Quidem Mirabiles, Qui 

Paucis Diebus Expleverunt 

Tempora Multa 

R. I. P. 

"Father de Seille is described as a man of grave and re- 
served manner. His long intercourse with the Indians im- 
parted to him a tinge of their deep melancholy. His face, 
though youthful, bore the traces of suffering and the marks 
of years; abstinence was written on his brow, and his down- 
cast eye accorded with his meek profession." The common 
belief of the Indians was that Father de Seille had the gift of 
prophecy: instancing the foretelling of his own death, also the 
fact, that the two wealthiest men in the neighborhood died 
penniless, as he said they would, and that a wooden cross 
erected by him was never touched by fire, although every 
thing about it was burnt two or three times, the Indians assert- 
ing that he foretold, it would never be destroyed by fire. 



THE REV. JULIUS SEIMETZ. 

He was born in Michigan City, Indiana, on April 17, 
1871. He studied the classics in St. Joseph's College, near 
Rensselaer, philosophy and theology, in Carthagena, Ohio, and 
in St. Francis' Seminary, of Wisconsin. He was ordained 
priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral of Fort Wayne, 
on the 21st day of June 1901. He was assistant in St. Charles' 
Church at Peru, from July 12, 1901 to June 30, 1905. He 
has been pastor at Reynolds with Medaryville and Francis- 
ville as missions, since July 4, 1905. 



THE REV. FELIX THOMAS SEROCZYNSKI. 

The son of Thomas and Justina (Iwaszkiewicz) Seroczyn- 
ski, was born on March 5, 1879 at Warsaw, Indiana. The 



178 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

family moved to Fort Wayne, in April 1893. In the same 
year, Felix entered St. Joseph's College, near Rensselaer. He 
was sent to Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, in 1899, 
and having finished his philosophical and theological studies, 
he was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral 
at Fort Wayne, on June 18, 1904. His first appointments 
were to supply the pastors of St. Stanislaus' Church at East 
Chicago and North Judson, two months each. He was assist- 
ant at St. Mary's, Lafayette, for about one month, when he 
was appointed pastor at North Judson, on November 25, 1905. 
He was transferred to St. Adalbert's Church, at Hammond, 
on June 8, 1907. 



THE REV. MARTIN SHERER. 

He was born at PfaflFenhofen, diocese of Augsburg, Ger- 
many, July 28, 1830; came to America, December 22, 1854; 
ordained priest at Lafayette, Indiana, October 24, 1858. He 
was the pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Laporte, for a period 
of about nine years. From here he paid frequent visits to 
Michigan City, continuing to attend the Germans here until 
the arrival of Rev. George Steiner. In 1859, he organized St. 
Martin's Congregation at Schimmels. His name appears on 
the baptismal records of Klaasville, February 26, 1867. During 
the absence of Rev. B. Rachor, he and other priests attended 
St. John, from October 1866 till November 1868. Later he 
was a priest of the Archdiocese of St. Louis, where he died. 



THE REV. RICHARD SHORTIS, C. S. C. 

He was born at St. Nicholas, Ireland, March 21, 1815; 
received the habit, July 13, 1849; profession, March 19, 1850. 
He visited Laporte after the year 1840. He also visited Mich- 
igan City, from 1847 to 1852. He died September 14, 1887, 
and is buried at Notre Dame. 



THE REV. DOMINIC SHUNK, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Canal Fulton, Ohio, November 26, 1855; 
ordained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 11, 1881. He was 



The Clergy, Continued. 179 

the organizer of the parish of the Most Precious Blood at 
Wanatah, being the pastor from June 1887 to February 1897. 
From Wanatah he attended as missions: Schimmels, San 
Pierre, Walkerton, Westville, Hamlet, Wheatfield, North 
Judson and Kouts, and the station Knox. He attended 
Schimmels, residing at San Pierre, from July 1885 to 1888, 
and residing at Wanatah, from 1888 to February 1897. 



THE REV. FRANCIS J. SIEGELACK. 

He was born at Duesseldorf, Prussia, diocese of Cologne, 
on November 23, 1833; came to America, July 26, 1863; or- 
dained priest, October 6, 1865. He was the pastor of Ply- 
mouth, from 1866 to 1869; the first resident pastor of St. 
Martin's Church, Hanover Centre, from 1869 to 1873, attend- 
ing also Klaasville as a mission. At present he is the pastor 
of St. Mary Magdalene's Church, New York City. 



THE REV. SIMON SIEGRIST. 

He was born at Stottsheim, diocese of Strassburg, Ger- 
many, on February 13, 1822, and emigrated to the United 
States, on June 19, 1847. He was ordained priest, August 29, 
of the same year. He was pastor of St. Mary's Church, Indian- 
apoHs, from January 21, 1858, till his death October 28, 1873. 
While at Indianapolis, he attended Kokomo as a mission for 
a time. As far as can be ascertained, he was the first priest 
who celebrated Mass in Tipton county. 



THE REV. JULIAN SKRZYPINSKI. 

He was born at Rogozno, Province Posen, Germany, on 
January 9, 1881. He attended the schools of his native place. 
His classical studies were begun in his native town and fin- 
ished at St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin. 
His philosophical and theological studies were begun and com- 
pleted at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cedar Point, Ohio. 



180 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

He received tonsure and the first two Minor Orders in June, 
1905; the other two Minor Orders in June, 1906; Subdeacon- 
ship on March 15, and Deaconship on March 16, 1907: all at 
the Seminary. He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding, 
in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 22, 1907. His first 
appointment was acting pastor of St. Stanislaus' Church, at 
East Chicago, during the absence of Father Bolka. 



THE REV. WILLIBALD SLIEMERS, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Minster, Ohio, April 20, 1860; ordained 
priest, at Carthagena, Ohio, March 17, 1889. He was the 
pastor of Pulaski, from 1894 to 1896. 



THE REV. BRUNO SOENGEN. 

He was born in Mentz, Germany, on August 8, 1856. He 
made his studies in Mentz, Innsbruck and Rome. He was 
ordained priest by Bishop Haller, the Co-adjutor of Trent, on 
February 9, 1879. He was a member of the Capuchin Order, 
until 1894, and came to Fort Wayne, July 18, 1895. He was 
appointed as follows: Assistant at SS. Peter and Paul's 
Church, Huntington, till December 9, 1895; pastor of St. 
Catharine's Church, in Nix Settlement, Whitley county, with 
Roanoke, Huntington county, as a mission, until July 1, 1905, 
when he resigned and made a trip to Europe; assistant at St, 
Joseph's Church and chaplain at St. Margaret's Hospital, at 
Hammond, since November 15, 1905. 



THE REV. DANIEL J. SPILLARD, C. S. C. 

He was born in Cork, Ireland, November 8, 1839. He 
came to the United States in 1845. He spent some time in 
Rochester, New York, and in Elgin, Illinois, when in 1864 he 
graduated at Notre Dame University. He joined the Con- 
gregation of the Holy Cross the same year and was ordained 
priest in 1868. He was prefect of discipline at Notre Dame, 



The Clergy, Continued. 181 

until he became pastor of St. Patrick's Church at South Bend, 
where he continued from March 1871 until April 1874. He is 
at present the President of the Holy Cross College at New 
Orleans. 



THE REV. ANTHONY STACHOWIAK. 

He was born in Daszewsice, Archdiocese of Posen, Ger- 
many on May 5, 1878. He studied the classics in SS. Cyrillus 
and Methodius' Seminary at Detroit, Michigan; philosophy 
and theology in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati. He 
was ordained priest in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, by Bishop 
Alerding, on May 24, 1902. He was the assistant at St. Stan- 
islaus' Church, Michigan City, from the time of his ordination 
till June 22, 1906, since which time he is the pastor of St. 
John Cantius' Church at Indiana Harbor. 



THE REV. GUI DO STAELO, O. F. M. 

He was born April 7, 1856; entered the Order, August 19, 
1873; ordained priest, November 7, 1879; attended Reming- 
ton, from 1879 to 1881; assistant at St. Boniface's Church, 
Lafayette, from August 1893 to September 1894. 



THE REV. JOHN B. STEGER. 

He was born in Obernoebling, Bavaria, in the diocese of 
Regensburg, Germany, on June 13, 1875. He studied the 
classics in Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, philosophy in Bozen, 
in Tyrol, and in St. Viateur's, Bourbonnais, Illinois, and theol- 
ogy in St. Meinrad's Seminary. He was ordained priest by 
Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, on June 
17, 1905. Having returned from a visit to his parents in his 
native country, he was appointed assistant at Decatur, on 
August 24, 1905. He is the assistant at Kokomo, since Sep- 
tember 18, 1906. 



182 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. GEORGE STEINER. 

He was born in New Ulm, Bavaria, diocese of Augsburg, 
on April 11, 1836; came to America in September 1854; or- 
dained priest, September 4, 1860. He was pastor of St. Mary's 
Church, Michigan City, from September 1860 till September 
21, 1864; pastor of St. Michael's Church, Plymouth, from 
1864 to 1866, attending also Monterey as a mission; pastor 
of St. Patrick's Church, Lagro, from September 1, 1866 till 
August 1, 1868. During the time, from September 25th, until 
December 22, 1866, he went on a collecting tour for the orphan 
asylums. While pastor at Michigan City, he attended Ham- 
mond at different times and from Lagro, he visited Wabash as 
a station. On August 1, 1868, he was appointed pastor of 
SS. Peter and Paul's Church, Huntington, where he labored 
with great zeal and success. Owing to ill health, he spent the 
winter of 1876 to 1877, in Florida, and the spring and summer 
of 1877, in Minnesota, to regain his health. But Providence 
determined otherwise, for he was obliged to resign his pastoral 
charge, in January 1880, when with his faithful friend. Rev. 
Julius Becks, he went to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he 
died peacefully, on June 1st, of the same year. His remains 
rest in the cemetery at Albuquerque. 



THE REV. CLEMENT STEINKAMP, O. F. M. 

A son of Henry and Catharine (Taben) Steinkamp, was 
born on March 22, 1842 at Meppen, Province of Hanover, 
Prussia; he emigrated to America, arriving on the 26th of 
March, 1865. He attended the Gymnasium of his native place, 
where he made his classical course. He entered the Order of 
St. Francis in 1866, and was ordained priest at Louisville, 
Kentucky, on June 6, 1869. He attended to St. Joseph's 
Church at Reynolds, from 1885 to 1887. He is the chaplain 
of St. Elisabeth's Hospital at Lafayette, filling this position 
since 1900. 



THE RIGHT REV. MGR. JOSEPH ANDREW STEPHAN. 

He was born at Gissigheim, Baden, Archdiocese of Frei- 
burg, on November 22, 1822; came to America in May 1847; 



The Clergy, Continued. 183 

ordained priest, at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 19, 1849. In 1856, 
residing at San Pierre, he celebrated Mass in the home of 
Michael Vogel at Reynolds; from 1858 to 1859, he visited 
Delphi, a station, from Rensselaer; in 1860, he attended 
Oxford, Earl Park, St. Anthony's, and Kentland, till April 
1870; in 1875, residing at San Pierre, he attended St. Martin's 
Church, at Schimmels, and procured a donation of land for 
the church at Wanatah. * He died on September 12, 1901, at 
Washington, D. C, where he is buried. 



THE REV. THEODORE STEPHAN, O. F. M. 

He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 23, 1862 and 
was ordained priest, February 28, 1885. He was appointed 
the second pastor of St. Lawrence's Church, at Lafayette, on 
November 8, 1896, but owing to ill health was obliged to resign 
after a few weeks. 



THE REV. CHARLES VINCENT STETTER, D.D. 

He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on February 22, 
1859. He made his classical studies at the Canisius' College 
of Buffalo, New York, at St. Nazianz, Wisconsin, and St. 
Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin. He made his 
philosophical and theological studies in St. Francis' Seminary, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and in Rome, Italy, where he was 
ordained priest by Cardinal Monaco La Vallette, on March 24, 
1883. The degree. Ph. D., was conferred on him by the Roman 
Academy of St. Thomas, and the degree, D.D., by the College 
of the Propaganda. His appointments were the following: 
Pastor of St. Joseph's Church, at Dyer, from August 23, 1883 
till July 29, 1888; pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's Church, 
Lottaville, and the mission Hobart, from July 29, 1888 till 
August 23, 1902; pastor of St. Bridget's Church, Hobart, 
from August 23, 1902 till February 13, 1903; pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, Kentland, since February 13, 1903. 



184 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

THE REV. CHARLES STEURER. 

He was born at Glotterthal, Archdiocese of Freiburg, 
Germany, September 27, 1845; ordained priest, at St. Peter, 
Black Forests, July 24, 1870; came to America, June 24, 1875. 
He was the resident pastor at Dyer, from August 4, 1875 till 
January 30, 1878. In June 1881, he succeeded the Rev. 
William Berg, as pastor of St. Martin's Church, Hanover 
Centre. At present he is in charge of a parish in the diocese 
of Peoria, Illinois. 



THE REV. NICHOLAS J. STOFFEL, C. S. C. 

He was born at Holzen, diocese of Luxemburg, on October 
20, 1854; came to America in 1874; ordained priest, at Notre 
Dame, October 12, 1878. He was the pastor of St. Joseph's 
Church, South Bend, from August 1889 until the time of his 
death, March 20, 1902. 



THE REV. ANTHONY J. STRUEDER. 

He was the pastor of Marion, from 1883 till September 
1884; resident pastor at Dunnington, from the summer of 
1884 till May 15, 1888; resident pastor of St. Anthony's, in 
Benton county, from May 1888 till August 1891, attending 
also Goodland as a mission; resident pastor at Portland, from 
October 1891 till October 25, 1894, the date of his death. He 
is buried at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE REV. CHARLES L. STUER. 

He was born at St. Gilles, diocese of Ghent, on September 
11, 1876. He studied the classics at Renaise, philosophy at 
St. Nicholas, theology at Ghent, and was ordained priest by 
Bishop Stillemans of Ghent, on June 9, 1900. He emigrated 
to America, and arrived in Mishawaka, on September 29, 1902 
and was appointed assistant priest at St. Joseph's Church, of 
that city, until March 1903, when St. Bavo's Congregation 
was organized for the Belgians and he was appointed its pastor. 



The Clergy, Continued. 185 

THE REV. WILLIAM D. SULLIVAN. 

He was born at Lafayette, Indiana, on August 16, 1876. 
He studied the classics in St. Joseph's College, near Rensselaer, 
philosophy and theology in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, at 
Cincinnati. He was ordained priest by Bishop Alerding on 
May 24, 1902, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne. His first 
appointment was that of assistant at the Cathedral. 



THE REV. FRANCIS X. SZULAK, S. J. 

He was born at Netschiz, Austria, diocese of Olmetz, 
December 17, 1825; ordained priest, September 20, 1851; 
came to this country August 16, 1865. He visited the Polish 
Catholics at Otis and the surrounding country, from Chicago, 
in the early sixties. When a station, from 1870 to 1884, Terre. 
Coupee was visited occasionally by him, celebrating Mass in 
the woods and in log cabins. He is still at Chicago, giving 
missions to the Poles and Bohemians in the vicinity of Chicago. 



THE REV. CHARLES THIELE. 

He was born on June 22, 1863, at Leer, Oestfriesland, 
Hanover, Germany. Three years old, he came with his 
parents to America, the family locating in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. A few years later they moved to Goshen, Indiana. 
Here he spent his boy-hood days and received his early educa- 
tion. In 1879, he entered on his classical course at the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame, after which he was sent to St. Francis' 
Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for his philosophical and 
theological studies. He was ordained priest by Bishop Dwenger 
in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on June 29, 1888. He was 
appointed pastor of Monterey, remaining, from July 1, 1888 
till August 1898, attending also the missions, Rochester, Kouts 
and Culver. He was transferred to the pastorate of Sacred 
Heart Church, Whiting, from August 1898 till June 7, 1905, 
when he was named the irremovable rector of St. Peter's 
Church at Fort Wayne. 



186 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. JOHN M. TOOHEY, C. S. C. 

He was born at Birr, Kings County, Ireland, October 31, 
1840; received the habit, August 15, 1856; profession, August 
15, 1864; ordained priest, September 8, 1864. He was pastor 
at St. Vincent, Allen county, from 1890 to 1895. He died, 
February 13, 1905, at Austin, Texas, where he is buried. 



THE REV. THOMAS TRAVERS. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, on May 19, 1880, 
studied the classics at St. Joseph's College at Rensselaer, phi- 
losophy at St. Paul's Seminary, Minnesota, and theology at 
St. Bernard's Seminary at Rochester, New York. He was 
ordained priest by Bishop Alerding in the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, on June 18, 1904. He was assistant at St. Vincent 
de Paul's Church in Logansport, from July 2, 1904 till Decem- 
ber 7, 1905. He has been the pastor at Fairmount with 
Matthews for a station, since December 7, 1905. 



THE REV. JOHN TREMMEL. 

He was born in Fort Wayne, August 29, 1866, a son of 
John and Josephine (Kelliger) Tremmel, natives of Germany 
and Switzerland, respectively. He attended the parochial 
schools of his native city, and in the fall of 1881, he entered 
St. Lawrence's College, Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, where he 
studied the classics. Having completed his classical studies, 
he made his philosophical and theological course at St. Francis' 
Seminary, Milwaukee, and Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cin- 
cinnati, respectively. He was ordained priest by Archbishop 
Elder, on June 13, 1890. His first appointment was assistant 
at St. Joseph's Church, Hammond. He had charge of St. 
Patrick's Congregation at Lagro, from July to August 1891, 
when he was appointed pastor of Covington, with Veedersburg, 
as a mission. On September 1, 1905 he assumed charge of 
St. Michael's Church at Plymouth, his present pastorate. 



The Clergy, Continued. 187 

THE REV. PAULINUS TROST, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Urach, Black Forests, Archdiocese of 
Freiburg, Germany, May 12, 1856; came to America, October 
15, 1876; ordained priest, May 28, 1885. He attended Port- 
land as a mission, from March to July 1904. 



THE REV. JOSEPH UPHAUS, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Glandorf, Ohio, October 1, 1844; ordained 
priest at Carthagena, Ohio, January 17, 1873. He was the 
pastor of Holy Trinity Church, in Jay county, from 1878 till 
1888; pastor of St. Peter's Church, Winamac, from 1897 till 
the fall of 1898. 



THE REV. THOMAS VAGNIER, C. S. C. 

He was born near Fort Wayne, on March 22, 1839; made 
his profession, February 2, 1862; ordained priest, June 10, 
1867. He was pastor of St. Joseph's Church, South Bend, 
from July 1st, to August 1880. He was the first resident 
pastor at Earl Park, from 1887 till August 1895. 



THE REV. THEODORE VANDERPOEL. 

He was born at Amsterdam, Holland, diocese of Harlem, 
in the year 1831. Having emigrated to the United States in 
1848, he was ordained priest, on November 7, 1852. His name 
appears on the baptismal records of the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne on March 31, 1859. He was the first resident priest 
at Areola, arriving there and celebrating Mass on Christmas 
day 1867. While pastor at Areola he also attended Nix Settle- 
ment and Roanoke as missions. 



THE REV. FELIX VENIARD, C. S. C. 

He was born in France, being a priest for forty-two years, 
and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Cross for forty- 



188 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

four years. He was the pastor of St. Joseph's Church at South 
Bend, from September 1877 till July 1, 1880. He was the 
resident pastor of St. Louis' Church at Besancon, from 1880 
till his death on May 27, 1893. 



THE REV. RAYMOND VERNIMONT, C. PP. S. 

He was born at Beerwick, Ohio, October 15, 1856; or- 
dained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 30, 1885. He was the 
pastor of the Most Precious Blood Church at Wanatah, from 
September 22, 1897 till September 8, 1898, having charge also 
of the missions Schimmels, Walkerton and Hamlet. 



THE REV. GABRIEL VOLKERT. 

He was born at Heckfeld, Baden, Archdiocese of Frei- 
burg, Germany, on May 17, 1833; came to America, August 
25, 1859; ordained priest, January 26, 1861. He appears to 
have been, for a time at least, assistant to Rev. Martin Sherer, 
pastor at Laporte, and attended from Laporte, St. Martin's 
Church at Schimmels. While pastor at Plymouth, from 1862 
to 1864, he also attended Monterey. He became later a priest 
of the diocese of Albany, New York. 



THE REV. FREDERICK VON SCHWEDLER. 

He was born in Westphalia, Germany, February 12, 1841, 
the son of Theodore and Gertrude (von Hannes) von Schwedler. 
He studied the classics in the Gymnasium at Munster; phi- 
losophy and theology, four years at Innsbruck, Austria, one 
year in Louvain, Belgium, and one year in Rome, Italy. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Luers at Fort Wayne, on August 
18, 1869. His appointments were: Temporary charge of 
St. Paul's Church, Fort Wayne; temporary charge of St. 
Joseph's Church, Logansport; assistant at St. Mary's Church, 
Fort Wayne, for five months; pastor of the same church for 
seven months; temporary charge of Union City, from 1871 



The Clergy, Continued. 189 

to. 1 872, attending also Dunkirk ^s a mission ; pastor of Decatur, 
from 1872 to 1877. In 1877, he left the diocese of Fort Wayne 
and went to the diocese of Peoria, where he was pastor of 
Oilman, Illinois, and then for thirteen years, pastor of St. 
Boniface's Church, Peoria. In 1892, he returned to the dio- 
cese of Fort Wayne and had charge of St. Anthony's, in Benton 
county, attending Goodland as a mission; pastor of Monroe- 
ville; pastor of Chesterton, from February 1898 till May 1899; 
pastor of Attica, since May 1899. 



THE REV. JOHN C. WAKEFER. 

He was born at Crawfordsville, Indiana, March 8, 1876. 
He attended the parochial schools of his native place. At the 
age of fifteen he entered the University of Notre Dame, where 
he remained four years, completing his classical studies at St. 
Joseph's College, near Rensselaer. He was accepted by Bishop 
Rademacher for the diocese of Fort Wayne, August 1897. At 
Mount St. Mary's Seminary, he entered and completed his 
course in philosophy and theology and was ordained priest at 
the Cathedral, Fort Wayne, by Bishop Alerding, on June 21, 
1901. His first appointment was that of assistant at St. Mary's 
Church, in Lafayette, where he remained until his appoint- 
ment of pastor at Dunkirk, on September 7, 1902. He holds 
that position at the present time. He also attends to Red 
Key and Albany as missions. 



THE REV. ROBERT WALLACE, C S. C. 

He was born at Lourglin, Ireland, April 2, 1824; received 
the habit, January 17, 1851; profession, August 15, 1853; 
ordained priest, by Bishop Van de Velde, at Notre Dame, 
August 18, 1853. He was the resident pastor at Laporte 
succeeding Father Rooney. 



THE REV. EDWARD P. WALTERS. 

He was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, March 10, 1839. 
He made his studies at St. Mary's College, Perry county. 



190 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Missouri, and at St. Vincent's, Cape Girardo, the same State. 
He was adopted into the diocese of Fort Wayne and ordained 
priest, by Bishop Luers, on May 15, 1864. The Bishop made 
him his secretary and assistant priest at the Cathedral. In 
January 1868, he was appointed the pastor of St. Bernard's 
Church, Crawfordsville, where he labored with much success. 
On May 16, 1878, he was appointed pastor of St. Vincent's 
Church, Logansport, where he remained until June 16, 1883, 
when he was made pastor of St. Mary's Church, Lafayette. In 
1886, he accom.panied Bishop Dwenger, as his theologian, to 
the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore. Father Walters 
urged that St. Ann's Parish be made an independent one. On 
January 1, 1887, he was made irremovable rector. He was a 
member of the Diocesan School Board. He died on June 12, 
1894, at Lafayette, where his remains rest. 



THE REV. PETER J. WEBER. 

He was born in New York City, on May 13, 1868. His 
father having died, his mother took him at the age of four years 
to Europe, where he received his common school education in 
Hessia, Baden, and his classical education and philosophy in 
St. Nicholas, Belgium, and theology in the American College 
of Louvain. He was ordained priest by the Bishop of Malines, 
Belgium, on January 6, 1891. After his ordination, he was 
stationed at Klaasville, with Lowell for a mission, from April 
27, 1891 till August 1, 1895, when he received his present 
appointment, pastor of St. John the Baptist's Church in Earl 
Park. 



THE REV. UBALDUS WEBERSINKE, O. F. M. 

He was born. May 13, 1837; entered the Order, August 30, 
1856; ordained priest, June 2, 1860; pastor in Lafayette, from 
August 1890 to July 1892, at St. Boniface's Church. 



THE REV. M. P. WEHRLE. 

He was born at Cologne, on March 13, 1829; came to 
America in 1855; ordained priest, July 31, 1858. Residing at 



The Clergy, Continued. 191 

Turkey Creek, he attended Dyer as a station up to 1865. While 
pastor at St. John, from 1865 to 1868, he attended Klaasville 
as a mission. He succeeded the Rev. F. X. Nigh in visiting 
Hanover Centre, residing at Crown Point, being the first resi- 
dent pastor, from 1865 to November 1868. While on a visit 
to his native country, he died on the train. 



THE REV. JUSTINE WEEK, O. P. M. 

He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 26, 1875; 
received his elementary education at St. Francis' parochial 
school of the same city; made his classics at St. Francis' Gym- 
nasium, Cincinnati, Ohio; entered the Order, August 15, 1891; 
ordained priest by Bishop Chatard, at Indianapolis, August 12, 
1898. He has been assistant at St. Boniface's Church, Lafay- 
ette, since August 18, 1906. 



THE REV. PETER A. WELLING, O. F. M. 

He was born at Oldenburg, Indiana, May 11, 1857; ordained 
priest at Louisville, Kentucky, December 28, 1885. He at- 
tended St. Joseph's Church at Reynolds, sometime between 
the years 1886 and 1888. He visited the station Frankfort, 
from Lafayette in 1890 till August. 



THE REV. JOHN E. WELLINGHOFF, O. F. M. 

He was born at Hamilton, Ohio, November 28, 1854; 
ordained priest at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 22, 1877. He 
it appears, attended Remington every two weeks, from 1876 
to 1879. 



THE REV. JOHN WEMHOFF. 

He was born in .Munster, Germany, on October 11, 1837. 
He came to America in 1858 and made his home with his uncle. 



192 Tie Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Bernard Wemhoff. He was ordained priest by Bishop Luers, 
March 23, 1862. He celebrated his first Mass in St. Boniface's 
Church, Lafayette, Indiana. He was Rev. Joseph Stephan's 
assistant for one year and a half in different portions of the 
diocese. In 1863, he was transferred to Avilla and remained 
there for one year and a half, attending Ege as a mission. 
On December 1, 1865, he became pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Decatur, having charge also of Hesse Cassel in 1868. In 1872 
he was made pastor of St. Peter's Church, Fort Wayne, where 
he labored faithfully till 1880, when on December 1st, of that 
year, after a lingering illness, he breathed his last, at the age 
of forty-three years and one month. His remains rest in the 
cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. AEMILIAN WENDEL, O. S. B. 

He was born at Aesgenrieth, Bavaria, October 22, 1832; 
came to America, February 16, 1849; ordained priest at Coving- 
ton, Kentucky, January 6, 1859. He was either the resident 
or the visiting pastor of Lottaville, predecessor of Rev, Joseph 
Flach. 



THE REV. JAMES WERDEIN. 

He was the first resident pastor at Remington, from 1883 
to May 1886; pastor of Areola, from 1887 for about four years. 
He died at Benton, Montana, on March 17, 1899, and is buried 
at the same place. 



THE REV. EDWARD WERLING. 

He was born at Tiffin, Ohio, on April 12, 1877. He com- 
pleted his classical studies at St. Joseph's College, near Rens- 
selaer, Indiana. He made his philosophical and theological 
studies at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cedar Point, Ohio, in 
May 1907. He received tonsure in June, 1904; the two first 
Minors in June, 1905; the two last Minors in June, 1906; Sub- 



The Clergy, Continued. 193 

deaconship March 15th, Deaconship March 16, 1907, at the 
Seminary. He was ordained prfest by Bishop Alerding in the 
Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 22, 1907. His first appoint- 
ment was assistant at St. Joseph's Church, Mishawaka, on 
June 8, 1907. 



THE REV. JOSEPH WEUTZ. 

He was born at Lastrup, Oldenburg, diocese of Munster, 
September 19, 1832; came to America, October 24, 1854; 
ordained priest, March 25, 1855. At the time of the separa- 
tion of the diocese of Fort Wayne from that of Vincennes, in 
1857, he was appointed pastor of St. Mary's Church, Fort 
Wayne. He resigned in 1872 and retired to Gratz, Austria, 
where he spent the last years of his life. 



THE REV. FREDERICK C. WIECHMANN. 

He was born at Washington, D. C, on January 3, 1846. 
He made his studies in the seminaries at Philadelphia, Cleve- 
land and Cincinnati. He was ordained priest by Bishop Luers, 
on September 8, 1870, at Fort Wayne. His appointments were 
the following: Assistant at St. Mary's Church, Fort Wayne, 
one month; assistant at St. Charles' Church, Peru, from 1870 
till 1871; first resident pastor of Wabash, from February 1871 
till October 1879; pastor of Warsaw till 1884; pastor of Ander- 
son, from August 1884 till May 1891; pastor of Grass Creek, 
from October 1891 till the fall of 1893; pastor of Gas City and 
the Soldiers' Home, from 1893 till the time of his death, Decem- 
ber 15, 1905. Rochester, Elwood, Bunker Hill, Miami, Cicero, 
Marion, North Manchester, Pierceton, Noblesville, Lucerne and 
Fairmount were missions attended by him at different times. 
His remains rest in the cemetery at Anderson. 



THE REV. BERNARD WIEDAU. 

He was born at Coesfeld, in the diocese of Munster, Ger- 
many, on September 19, 1840. He spent nine years in the 



194 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Gymnasium of Coesfeld, and three years at the Munster 
University, and two years at the American Seminary, in 
Louvain, Belgium. He was ordained a priest at MaHnes, 
Belgium, for the diocese of Fort Wayne, on July 25, 1868. His 
appointments were : Assistant at St. Vincent's Church, Logans- 
port, till April 1869; pastor of Winamac, from April 1869 till 
September 1870; assistant at St. Vincent's Church, Logansport, 
till March, 1871 ; pastor pro tem. of St. Joseph's Church, Logans- 
port, till January 1872; pastor at Dyer, from January till Decem- 
ber 1872; pastor of Pulaski and Indian Creek, from the close of 
1872 till 1873; pastor of Winamac, till the summer of 1873. 
While pastor of Winamac, he attended Monterey as a mission. 
Pastor of St. John Baptist's Church, New Haven, since July 
1873. Father Wiedau is a Diocesan Consultor and Synodal 
Examiner. 



THE REV. HERMAN THEODORE WILKEN. 

He was born at Soegel, in the former kingdom of Hanover, 
on October 19, 1844. He emigrated to the United States in the 
beginning of September 1860, landed at Baltimore, Maryland, 
in the middle of October, and soon after arrived in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was a chairmaker by trade, which he followed until 
July 1864, when he enlisted in the United States Army as a 
carpenter and as such spent a few months in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. Returning home, he made up his mind to study for 
the priesthood and took private lessons from Fathers Top- 
moeller and Stehle. He entered the St. Xavier's College, on 
Sycamore street, Cincinnati, and graduated from there in 1870. 
His studies were continued in Mount St. Mary's Seminary, 
Cincinnati, until he was ordained priest by Archbishop Purcell, 
on November 9, 1872. He arrived in Fort Wayne on Novem- 
ber 20, 1872. His first Sunday on duty was at New Haven, 
where the pastor was very sick. From November 1872 till 
July 20, 1880, he was pastor of Areola, with the missions: 
Monroeville, Bluffton, Hartford City, Montpelier and Blees 
Settlement. He has been pastor of St. Mary's Church, Decatur, 
since July 20, 1880. He is an irremovable rector and a member 
of the Diocesan Building Committee. Having been pastor of 



The Clergy, Continued. 195 

St. Mary's Church for twenty-five years, the Silver Jubilee of 
his pastorate was celebrated with becoming solemnity by his 
parishoners and friends, on July 20, 1905. 



THE REV. IGNATIUS M. WILKENS, O. F. M. 

He was born February 15, 1856; entered the Order, Sep- 
tember 17, 1871; ordained priest, December 21, 1878; in Lafay- 
ette at St. Boniface's Church, from August 1888 to September 

1890 and again, from 1891 to December 1892. From August 

1891 to July 1892, he also visited the station Frankfort. 



THE REV. WILIBALD WILLI, C. PP. S. 

He was born in 1820, at Ems, Switzerland; came to this 
country in December 1850; ordained priest, by Bishop Rappe 
of Cleveland, at Tiffin, Ohio, January 27, 1851; entered the 
Congregation of the Most Precious Blood in Switzerland. He 
was the founder of the mission house, convent and parish of 
Holy Trinity, Jay county, in 1853. He died December 15, 
1854 and is buried at St. Mary's Home. 



THE REV. THEOPISTUS WITTMER, C. PP. S. 

He was born at ErHnsbach, diocese of Basle, July 9, 1848; 
came to America, March 19, 1861 ; ordained priest at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, January 25, 1872. He was the pastor of St. Peter's 
Church, at Winamac, from 1873 to 1876. 



THE REV. WILLIAM WOESTE. 

He was born at Loeningen, Oldenburg, diocese of Munster, 
Germany, in 1836; came to America, October 21, 1863; ordained 
priest, July 22, 1864. He attended Hesse Cassel and Sheldon, 
from 1866 till 1872. From the records, it appears, that he was 
the first resident pastor of Roanoke with Nix Settlement as a 



196 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

mission, from 1870 to November 19, 1880. He resided in a 
private house at Roanoke and visited Nix Settlement twice a 
month. 



THE REV. EMANUEL JOSEPH WROBEL. 

He was born on December 25, 1866, at Blottnitz, Salesia, 
diocese of Breslau, Germany. His studies were made at St. 
Francis' Seminary, Wisconsin, where he was ordained priest by 
Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids, Michigan, on June 22, 1890. 
He was assistant priest at St. Mary's Church, Michigan City, 
from July 1890 to January 15, 1891, when he was appointed 
pastor of St. Stanislaus' Church, of the same city, a newly 
organized congregation. Father Wrobel is a member of the 
Diocesan School Board. 



THE REV. RICHARD WURTH, O. F. M. 

He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 13, 1869, and 
received the habit of St. Francis, in Oldenburg, Indiana, on 
August 15, 1887. He was ordained priest, July 15, 1894. 
From August 16, 1894 till December 23, 1896, he was assistant 
priest at St. George's Church in Corryville, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
On the latter date he was appointed pastor of St. Lawrence's 
Church at Lafayette, which position he still holds. 



THE REV. SIMON M. YENN. 

He was born at South Bend, Indiana, on August 23, 1863. 
He made his classical course in the Canisius' College at Buffalo, 
New York. He began and completed his philosophical and 
theological course at the Propaganda in Rome, Italy. He was 
ordained priest in Rome by Archbishop Lenti, on April 20, 
1889. He was pastor of Goshen, from August 1, 1889, till 
February 1, 1900. Pastor of Areola and the mission Pierceton, 
from February 1, 1900 till March 1, 1901. Pastor of Plymouth, 
from March 1, 1901 till July 1, 1905. Chancellor of the diocese 
of Fort Wayne since July 1, 1905. He is also the Secretary of 
the Bishop's Council, of the Matrimonial Court and the Dio- 
cesan Director of Gregorian Chant. 



* The Clergy, Continued. 197 

THE REV. AUGUST YOUNG. 

He was born in Schleithal, Alsace, diocese of Strassburg, 
Germany, March 29, 1842. He made his classical studies in 
Strassburg and in Carthagena, Ohio, and his philosophical and 
theological course at St. Vincent's, Pennsylvania. He was 
ordained priest, on January 1, 1868, at Tiffm, Ohio, by Bishop 
Rappe of Cleveland. He came to the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
on March 19, 1868. His appointments were the following: 
Assistant at Huntington till August 1869; Rensselaer Orphan 
Asylum till October 1871; assistant at St. Mary's Church, Fort 
Wayne, till August 5, 1872; pastor of Auburn and missions till 
November 1886; pastor at Garrett, since November 1886. He 
attended Remington while residing at Rensselaer. 



THE REV. GREGORY ZERN. 

He was born, October 13, 1869, near Sheldon, Indiana. 
He studied the classics at Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, philos- 
ophy and theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained priest at Fort Wayne, by Bishop 
Rademacher, on June 21, 1895. His appointments were: 
Assistant at St. Mary's Church, Michigan City, fifteen months; 
pastor of Kewanna and Lucerne, from September 1896 till 
August 1898; pastor of Monterey and Kouts, attending also 
the missions, Rochester and Culver, from August 1898 to Octo- 
ber 1900; pastor of St. Anthony's and mission, from October 
1, 1900 till October 2, 1903; pastor of Goodland and Morocco, 
from October 1903 till August 27, 1905, on which date he died 
in St. Joseph's Hospital, Logansport. His remains were 
interred in the cemetery at Fort Wayne. 



THE REV. OTTO ZIEGLER, O. F. M. 

He was born, September 6, 1868; entered the Order, August 
30, 1885; ordained priest, December 17, 1892; assistant in 
Lafayette, from January 1893 to August 1894, at St. Boniface's 
Church. * 



198 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

THE REV. IGNATIUS F. ZIRCHER. 

He was born at Schirrheim, diocese of Strassburg, Ger- 
many, on July 31, 1875. He studied the classics in St. Joseph's 
College, near Rensselaer, philosophy and theology in Mount St. 
Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, and was ordained priest, 
by Bishop Alerding, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, on May 
24, 1902. His appointments were: Assistant at SS. Peter 
and Paul's Church, Huntington, from June 1902 to April 1905; 
assistant at Garrett; assistant at Besancon; pastor of SS. Peter 
and Paul's Church, Goodland, with Morocco as a mission, since 
October 10, 1905. 



THE REV. BEATUS ZISWYLER, C. PP. S. 

He was born in 1 844 ; came to this country in 1 868 ; ordained 
priest in 1873. He was the pastor of Pulaski, from 1873 to 1874; 
pastor of Monterey to 1875. 



THE REV. ANTHONY ZUBOWICZ, C. S. C. 

He is a native of Poland and was born in 1860. He was 
educated in his native country, commencing his classical educa- 
tion and in 1883 emigrated to America. His classical, philo- 
sophical and theological studies were completed at Notre Dame. 
He was ordained priest by Bishop Richter of Grand Rapids, 
on December 19, 1890. He was appointed assistant priest at 
St. Hedwig's Church, South Bend, where he remained until 
September 11, 1898. He was the first pastor of St. Casimir's 
Church at South Bend, until April 11, 1899, when he resigned. 
But he was reappointed and again took charge of St. Casimir's 
Church, which position he has held since June 13, 1902. 



THE REV. MATTHIAS ZUMBUELTE. 

Son of Anthony and Elizabeth (Oelinghoff) Zumbuelte, 
was born in Nottuln, diocese of Munster, Westphalia, Ger- 
many, on February 19, 1839. Having completed his parochial 
school education in his native city, he entered the Gymnasium 



The Clergy, Concluded. 199 

at Coesfeld, where he made his_classical studies. In 1861 he 
went to Munster, where he made the study of philosophy and 
two years of theology at the Academy. Bishop Luers, return- 
ing from his visit to Rome, met young Zumbuelte and granted 
him his wish of pursuing his studies in theology at the American 
University of Louvain, Belgium. He remained here for two 
years and was ordained priest by Cardinal Engelbert Sterkx, 
Archbishop of Malines, Belgium, on May 26, 1866. He emi- 
grated to America, in October of the same year and was made 
assistant at St. Vincent's Church, Logansport, attending to the 
missions: Harrison, Fulton (now Grass Creek), Winamac, 
Buena Vista. In January 1868 he was sent to Avilla, assistant 
to Rev. Dominic Duehmig, remaining until July, visiting the 
missions: Kendall ville, Ligonier, Millersburg, Goshen, Water- 
loo and Leo. In August of the same year, he was made pastor 
of Leo with Waterloo, Auburn and St. Michael's, near Summit, 
as missions. In 1872 he was transferred to Columbia City 
having Pierceton and Warsaw as missions. He remained here 
until 1875 when for seven months he had charge of Crown 
Point. On Easter Monday of the year 1876 he left Crown 
Point to make a visit to his native country and spend some 
time with his aged parents. Upon his return in August of 
1876, he was made Superintendent of the Orphan Asylum at 
Rensselaer, remaining till April 1888. In the spring of 1888 
he again crossed the ocean visiting his Alma Mater at Louvain 
and spending three months in Germany. Returning in Sep- 
tember of the same year, he took charge of St. Joseph's Church 
at Reynolds with Francisville and Medaryville as missions. 
In June 1889 he was transferred to his present charge that of 
pastor of St. Martin's Church at Hanover Centre. 



THE REV. GERARD ZURWELLEN. 

He was born at Bisbeck, Oldenburg, diocese of Munster, 
Germany, on October 21, 1844; emigrated to this country in 
July, 1859; ordained priest, June 6, 1868. He was pastor of 
Plymouth, from 1869 till the time of his death, February 5, 
1883. From here he attended the missions Rochester and 
Warsaw. His remains rest in the cemetery at Plymouth. 



CHAPTER IX. 



THE CHURCHES PRIOR TO 1S57, INCLUSIVE. 

NOTRE DAME FORT WA"k"NE, THE CATHEDR.\L LAGRO LOGANS- 
PORT, ST. VINCENT DE PAUL's — PERU — LAFAYETTE, ST. 

MARY's HL"NTINGTON, SS. PETER AND PAUL's — DECATUR 

— ST. JOHN FORT WAYNE, ST. MARYS — MISHAWAKA, ST. 

JOSEPH'S — MICHIGAN CITY, ST. MARY'S — KIX SETTLE- 
ment — besancon — hesse ca55el — lottaville pulaski 

— avilla laporte, st. peters — south bend, st. 

Joseph's — lafayette, st. eoniface's — monterey — st. 

VINCENT — L"NI0N CITY — KEWANNA. 



NOTRE DAME. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1831. 

The first church, not only at Notre Dame but in the diocese 
of Fort Wayne, was a log chapel erected bv Rev. Stephen 
Theodore Badin, as early as 1831. At that time it was known 
as the "Indian Chapel," and was the center of Father Badin's 
missionary acti\ities throughout Northern Indiana and South- 
em Michigan. It was located on the south edge of St. .Mary's 
lake. Having been destroyed by fire in 1856, a facsimile of it 
was erected recently, and the remains of Father Badin are 
buried in it. White settlers from the earliest days worshipped 
in this chapel and the present Sacred Heart Congregation has 
the extraordinar}' privilege of having for their church the 
magnificent Sacred Heart Church of Norte Dame. The num- 
ber of famihes, however, is small being only fifty-eight in 
number, or two hundred and ninety t\\'o souls. The pastor 
of the congregation, at the present time, is Rev. M. A. McGarry, 
C. S. C, D. D. 



The Churches, Continued. 201 

Father Badin had blessed a tract of land, about a mile 
north of South Bend, between the upper Niles road and the 
river, known as the "Old Indian Grave-yard," for a cemetery. 
This location was looked upon as not desirable, and when 
Father Sorin arrived, in 1842, he laid out the present cemetery 
on Notre Dame avenue, half way between Notre Dame and 
South Bend. Brother Francis, C. S. C, had charge of this 
cemetery, and when, some years later, his favorite evergreens 
gave it a sightly appearance, he called it Cedar Grove cemetery. 
In 1842, it formed but a small corner, but it now extends over 
twenty-five acres, and is being enlarged year after year. In 
the early days, Cedar Grove was the only graveyard for Cath- 
olics within many miles of South Bend, and for this reason, 
even at this day, corpses are brought from great distances, to 
be buried by the side of relatives and friends, who are interred 
there. 



FORT WAYNE. 

CAIHEDRAL OF THE IMMACULATE CONCF.PTION. 
1837. 

"The old Jesuit missionaries that may have visited Fort 
Wayne, when it was a mere trading post, have left here no 
record of their labors. The few Catholics that resided here 
were visited, for the first time on record, on the 3rd, of June, 
1830, by Very Rev. Stephen Theodore Badin, the first priest 
ordained in the United States. He was then Vicar General of 
the dioceses of Bardstown, Kentucky, and Cincinnati, Ohio. 
At that time the State of Indiana was within the limits of the 
diocese of Bardstown. Father Badin repeated his visits to 
Fort Wayne in 1831, offered the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass 
and preached in the residence of Francis Comparet, and, in 
1832, when he performed the functions of his ministry in the 
residence of John Bequette. 

"The next priest who visited this city was Rev. L. Picot, 
then pastor at Vincennes, September 25, 1832. Then Father 
Badin was again in Fort Wayne December 25, 1832. Rev. 
Boheme also in 1832. Father Badin again in 1833 and 1834. 
Rev. Simon P. Lalumiere, pastor at Terre Haute, visited Fort 



202 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Wayne in 1835. Rev. Felix Matthew Ruflf in 1835. Rev. J. 
F. Terrooren in 1835. Rev. John Claudius Francois, stationed 
at Logansport, visited Fort Wayne in January, February, May, 
June, July and August, 1836. 

"The first priest permanently appointed pastor of Fort 
Wayne was Rev. Louis Mueller, who took possession in August, 
1836, and remained until the 16th, of April, 1840. In 1838 
Fort Wayne was visited by Bishop Brute. In the beginning 
of 1840 Bishop Hailandiere appointed Rev. Julian Benoit 
pastor of St. Augustine's Church, Fort Wayne, having to attend 
(as missions) Lagro, Huntington, Columbia City, Warsaw, 
Goshen, Avilla, New France, New Haven, Besancon, Hesse 
Cassel and Decatur. His first assistant was Rev. Joseph 
Hamion, a saintly young priest, who died at Logansport in 
the early part of 1842. His second assistant was Rev. Joseph 
Rudolph, who died in Oldenburg, Franklin county, Indiana, 
after many years of hard missionary labors. His third assis- 
tant was Rev. F. A. Carius, who remained but a short time. 
The fourth was Rev. Alphonse Munschina, afterwards pastor 
at Lanesville, Indiana. The fifth was Rev. Edward Faller, 
who is now in the diocese of Vincennes. In 1849 the German 
portion of St. Augustine's congregation built a church and 
school-house, forming the first German speaking congregation 
in Fort Wayne, St. Mary's, of which Father Faller was made 
the first pastor." — (Father Benoit in History of Allen County.) 

The first undertaking of Father Benoit was the finishing 
of the church which had been begun by his predecessor. He 
very soon after erected school-houses, and secured the Sisters 
of Providence, and the Brothers of the Holy Cross, to take 
charge of these schools. 

The Right Rev. John H. Luers, who was appointed the 
first bishop of Fort Wayne, took up his residence in Fort Wayne, 
soon after his consecration, which took place on January- 10, 
1858. He died June 29, 1871. 

The Right Rev. Joseph Dwenger, the second bishop of 
Fort Wayne, from April 14, 1872, till January 29, 1893. 

The Right Rev. Joseph Rademacher, the third bishop of 
Fort Wayne, from July 14, 1893, till January 12, 1900. 

The Right Rev. Herman Joseph Alerding, the fourth bishop 
of Fort Wayne, was consecrated November 30, 1900. 



The Churches, Continued. 203 

The first church in Fort Wayne was a small frame struct- 
ure, erected in 1837, on the site of the present Cathedral and 
was known as St. Augustine's Church. In 1859 this first 
church was moved to the east side of the Cathedral Square, 
facing on Clinton street, but was shortly after destroyed by 
fire. In the same year, 1859, the present Cathedral was 
erected at a cost of about |54,000. The greater part of this 
money was collected by Father Benoit, while on a visit to New 
Orleans. The organ, pews and other furniture cost over |9,000. 
The episcopal residence was erected by Father Benoit, at a 
cost of $16,000, paid from his own resources. 

The first priest's house stood on the corner of Calhoun 
and Lewis streets. It was erected by Rev. A. Bessonies, who 
was pastor of St. Augustine's Church in 1853 and 1854, during 
Father Benoit's sojourn in New Orleans. 

The imposing building on Cathedral Square, known as 
Library Hall, was erected in 1880, under the management of 
Father Brammer. It was he, who secured a huge block of 
Irish marble, which forms the corner stone of this building. 

In 1896 the Cathedral underwent a thorough restoration, 
at a cost of about |50,000. This work also was superintended 
by Father Brammer. 

In 1901, the first year of Bishop Alerding's administration, 
the Bishop's House, on the corner of Lewis and Clinton streets, 
was erected. The necessary funds were secured from the sale 
of the old Cemetery grounds, near Fort Wayne, and of a farm, 
in Jasper county. 

In 1906 a Crypt, for the burial of church dignitaries, was 
constructed beneath the sanctuary at an expense of over |1,000. 
In 1907 two entrances, in addition to the main entrance, for 
the convenience of the parish, and adding much to the appear- 
ance of the building, were made at a cost of over |2,500. 

The parish has five hundred and seventy-five families, 
numbering two thousand and seven hundred souls. The 
schools taught by four Brothers of the Holy Cross, and sixteen 
Sisters of Providence, are attended by six hundred and seven 
pupils. During Rev. P. F. Roche's pastorate a number of 
improvements and many repairs were made, and $30,000 of 
the debt on the Cathedral property paid, reducing the same 
to less than $60,000. 



204 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

The societies are: The SodaHty of the Blessed Virgin for 
married men with one hundred and fifty members; the Rosary 
Society for married women, three hundred and eighty members; 
the SodaUty of the Blessed Virgin for single men, one hundred 
and forty members, the same for single women, two hundred 
and fifty members; the Children of Mary for boys and girls, 
one hundred and ninety-five members; the Holy Angels' Society 
for Children, one hundred and forty-three members. Besides 
these there are the C. K. of A., the C. B. L., the A. O. H., 
A. O. H. Auxiliary, St. Joseph's Benevolent Association, and 
the Knights of Columbus, with an aggregate membership of 
eight hundred and forty. 

We find the certificates of Baptism on the baptismal 
record of the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, beginning with January 
23, 1831, to the present time, signed as here follows: 

1. Very Rev. Stephen Theodore Badin, from January 
23, 1831, to January 5, 1832, affixing to his name Vicar General 
of Bardstown and Cincinnati; from December 25, 1832 to 
January 4, 1833, Vicar General of Bardstown; from June 8, 
1834 to September 5, 1834, Protosacerdos Baltimorensis. 

2. Rev. L. Picot from September 25, to October 11, 1832. 

3. Rev. Boheme from 1832 to 1833. 

4. Rev. Simon P. Lalumiere from May 31, to June 7, 
1835. 

5. Rev. Felix Matthew Ruff from August to September 

10, 1835. 

6. Rev. J. Ferd. Terrooren from November 20, to Decem- 
ber 29, 1835. 

7. Rev. J. C. Francois, January, February, May, June, 
July, and August, 1836 and June 1839. 

8. Rev. Louis Mueller from August 27, 1836, to May 

11, 1840. 

9. Rev. F. Bartels (pastor in Muenster) July 17, 1838. 
10 Rev. Julian Benoit from April 9, 1840, to January 

26, 1885. 

11. Rev. Joseph de Mutzig Hamion from September 19, 

1840, to April 17, 1842. 

12. Rev. Michael Clark (pastore absente) August 13, 

1841, June 1, and July 1842. 



The Churches, Continued. 205 

13. Rev. August Martin (pastore absente) May and June 
1842. 

14. Rev. Joseph Rudolph from July 18, 1842, to October 
16, 1844. 

15. Rev. J. B. Chasse October 10, 1842. 

16. Rev. Alphonse Munschina from December 15, 1844, 
to February 15, 1846. 

17. Rev. A. Carius April 12, 1846, June 17, 1846, and 
May 7, 1847. 

18. Rev. L. Baroux October 29, 1846. 

19. Rev. Edward M. Faller from November 8, 1846, to 
November 11, 1849. 

20. Rev. J. Baker July 24, 1852, and November 9, 1856- 

21. Rev. A. Bessonies from March 11, 1853, to February 
1, 1854. 

22. Rev. Theodore Van der Poel March 31, 1859. 
. 23. Rev. P. J. Madden February 1862. 

24. Rev. B. Kroeger August 23, 1863. 

25. Rev. E. P. Walters August 23, 1864. 

26. Rev. Jacob Mayer January 20, 1864. 

27. Rev. C. F. Smarius January 26, 1864. 

28. Rev. L. Lamoor July 16, 1865. 

29. Rev. M. M. Hallinan August 13, 1865. 

30. Rev. Francis Siegelack May 13, 1866. 

31. Rev. A. J. David May 31, 1868. 

32. Rev. Joseph Brammer June 28, 1868, until his death, 
June 20, 1898. 

33. Rev. Edward Koenig July 13, 1868. 

34. Rev. P. Jean Mcarleray November 17, 1868. 

35. Rev. J. Weutz February 7, 1870. 

36. Rev. W. F. M. O'Rourke July 30, 1871. 

37. Rev. Z. Zaza October 29, 1871. 

38. Rev. A. M. Aleile October 18, 1871 (Monroeville). 

39. Rev. John Grogan from February 7, to May 26, 1872. 

40. Rev. Joseph Graham from June 2, to November 3, 
1872. 



206 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

41. Rev. A. Young June 9, 1872. 

42. Rev. A. Beine, O. S. F. August 22, 1872. 

43. Rev. Joseph Rademacher November 11, 1872. 

44. Rev. John WemhoflF December 8, 1872. 

45. Rev. M. E. Campion from October 19, 1873, to April 

4, 1875. 

46. Rev. V. Putter, S. J., February 1, 1874. 

47. Rev. Francis X. Baumgartner March 22, 1874. 

48. Rev. Theodore Hibbelen August 4, 1874. 

49. Rev. B. Theodore Borg from November 15, 1874, to 
April 23, 1876. 

50. Rev. P. M. Frawley from April 25, 1875, to July 11, 
1875. 

51. Rev. John R. Dinnen from December 4, 1875, to May 

5, 1878. 

52. Rev. M. F. Kelly July 2, 1876. 

53. Rev. L. A. Moench from October 8, 1876, to Novem- 
ber 10, 1878. 

54. Rev. James M. Hartnett from May 11, 1878, to 
October 17, 1880. 

55. Rev. B. Roche, C. S. C. October 6, 1880, October 
1882, August 24, 1888. 

56. Rev. A. J. H. Kroeger November 7, 1880. 

57. Rev. Henry A. Boeckelmann from December 1, 1880, 
to February 16, 1885. 

58. Rev. P. F. Roche from July 12, 1881, to December 
11, 1881, and since June 16, 1901. 

59. Rev. Charles A. Ganzer November 16, 1882. 

60. Rev. James Twigg April 4, 1882. 

61. Rev. Constantine Maujay April 29, 1882. 

62. Rev. John F. Lang October 31, 1882. 

63. Rev. T. M. O'Leary from February 26, 1885, to 
October 1889. 

64. Rev. F. A. King August 3, 1885. 

65. Rev. Charles M. Romer June 27, 1886. 

66. Rev. Joseph Uphaus August 22, 1886. 

67. Rev. Joseph F. Delaney from July 24, 1887, to 
November 27, 1889. 



The Churches, Continued. 207 

68. Rev. William J. Ouinlan from July 10, 1888, to 
August 30, 1891. 

69. Rev. Michael J. Byrne July 22, 1888, and again 
September 3, 1898. 

70. Rev. John R. Quinlan July 13, 1890, and again 
March 10, 1901. 

71. Rev. M. Robinson, C. S. C. August 20, 1890. 

72. Rev. Charles B. Guendling August 6, 1892. 

73. Rev. George M. Schramm May 28, 1893. 

74. Rev. F. X. Labonte July 11, 1894. 

75. Rev. Thomas Eisenring, C. PP. S. October 18, 1894. 

76. Rev. Julius Becks September 8, 1895. 

77. Rev. L. R. Paquet October 27, 1895. 

78. Rev. A. E. Lafontaine May 25, 1896. 

79. Rev. George Lauer May 30, 1897. 

80. Rev. F. J. Dandurand August 8, 1897. 

81. Rev. John Durham August 19, 1897. 

82. Rev. John H. GuendHng August 1, 1898. 

83. Rev. P. J. O'Reilly July 16, 1899. 

84. Rev. J. H. Bathe September 21, 1899. 

85. Rev. Charles Dhe November 25, 1899. 

86. Rev. Aegidius, O. S. B. July 21, 1901. 

87. Rev. James B. Fitzpatrick August 4, 1901. 

88. Rev. William D. SulUvan June 8, 1902. 

The Very Rev. Julian Benoit, V. G. was rector of the 
Cathedral until January 26, 1885, the date of his death; the 
Very Rev. Joseph Brammer, V. G. from January 1885 till 
June 20, 1898, the date of his death; the Very Rev. John H. 
Guendhng, V. G. from July 15, 1898, till February 1901; the 
Rev. John R. Quinlan from March to May 16, 1901, when, on 
account of his health, he resigned and was succeeded by the 
Rev. Patrick F. Roche, who is the rector since May 16, 1901. 

The assistants at the Cathedral were: Rev. John P. Dur- 
ham from June 17, 1897, till March 7, 1901; Rev. Peter J. 
O'Reilly from December 1897, till January 1902; Rev. James 
B. Fitzpatrick from July 1901, till February 1903; Rev. William 
D. Sullivan since June 1902; Rev. William C. Miller since 
August 28, 1906, whose duties are to assist at the Cathedral 
and do clerical work at the Bishop's House. 



208 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

LAGRO. 

ST. Patrick's church. 
1838. 

Jesuit Missionaries, on their way from Montreal, Canada, 
to post Vincennes, visited Lagro as early as 1800. The ven- 
erable missionary. Father Badin, stopped there, in 1833, on 
his way from Fort Wayne to Logansport. The construction 
of the Wabash and Erie Canal, in 1837, opened up a general 
traffic, and Lagro became the chief shipping center for wheat, 
corn and other crops. A number of families, of whom many 
were Irish Catholic, came from the east to make Lagro and 
its vicinity their home. 

Lagro has no church records prior to 1846, but such names 
as: de St. Palais, Benoit, Clark, and Franciscans, are frequently 
mentioned. It was in 1838, when Thomas Fitzgibbon donated 
two lots, and a frame church, 30x40 feet was erected. Begin- 
ning with the year 1846, we have the following names of 
clergymen, who attended to the spiritual wants of St. Patrick's 
Congregation : 

1. Rev. Patrick McDermott, from May 24, 1846, to 
August 27, 1847. 

2. Rev. Michael C. O'Flannigan, from September 12, 
1847, to August 8, 1848. 

3. Rev. John Ryan, from September 9, 1848 to January 

1865, who built an addition of 30x40 feet to the church. The 
church having now the dimensions of 60x40 feet. He had 
charge also of the missions, Huntington, Wabash, Warsaw and 
Pierceton. On November 20, 1857 he bought two acres of 
land for cemetery purposes. 

4. Rev. Bernard Kroeger from January to September 

1866, who bought the old priest's house for |1,000. 

5. Rev. George Steiner, from September 1, 1866 until 
August 1, 1868. During his absence on a collecting tour for 
the Orphan Asylums, from September 25 until December 22, 
1866, Rev. J. A. Winter supplied his place. Father Steiner 
bought a frame house for |200, and opened in it the first 
parochial school, with Julia Cannon, the teacher. 



The Churches, Continued. 209 

6. Rev. Matthew E. Campion, from August 3, 1868 until 
October 1, 1873, who built the present brick church, with a 
frontage of 50 feet, a depth of 114 feet, and a height from floor 
to ceiling of 38 feet, having a seating capacity of 600. The 
corner stone was laid by Bishop Luers, on June 15, 1870. The 
church being under roof September 1, 1872, a fair was held in 
it netting the handsome amount of |1,600. Bishop Dwenger 
dedicated the church, on March 17, 1873. This was the most 
flourishing period in the history of Lagro. The number of 
souls, belonging to St. Patrick's Church, was 300 families. At 
the present writing St. Patrick's has lost much of its prestige, 
as may appear from the following comparative statements: 
In 1870, forty-five baptisms, in 1906 five; in 1870, marriages 
sixteen, in 1906 none; in 1870 deaths eighteen, in 1906 two. 

7. Rev. John Grogan, from October 1, 1873, until March 
1, 1882, who placed oak pews in the church, a stairway to the 
gallery, a most ornamental communion railing of black walnut, 
a handsome pulpit, confessional, baptismal font and, besides 
all this, had the church frescoed. The total cost of the church 
with furnishings was more than |20,000, all cash paid. 

8. Rev. M. F. Kelly, from April 20, 1882 until January 
1884. 

9. Rev. Patrick F. Roche, from February 3, 1884 until 
August 24, 1888, who purchased the pipe organ, for |700. 

10. Rev. Anthony J. Kroeger, from August 28, 1888 until 
June 1, 1890, who reopened the school in the old frame church, 
and secured the Sisters of St. Francis of Lafayette, as teachers. 
He also built the church in Andrews. 

11. Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan, from June 1890, until July 
1891. 

12. Rev. John Tremmel, from July to August 1891. 

13. Rev. Julius Becks, from August 1891 till August 1894. 

14. Rev. G. M. Kelly, from August 29, 1894 till Novem- 
ber 1895. 

15. Rev. Michael Hanly, from December 1, 1895, until 
December 27, 1897. 

16. Rev. Peter Joseph Quinn, pastor since January 1, 
1898. 



210 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Father Quinn found the church property sorely in need 
of repairs. He expended over |2,000 for this purpose. The 
lots on the cemetery having been sold, he purchased the ad- 
joining five acres, inclosing the same with. an iron fence, entail- 
ing an expense of about |600. In 1904, Father Quinn built a 
parochial residence, with modern improvements, at a cost of 
about |4,000. The present indebtedness of the congregation 
is |125. The number of souls is 250, or forty famihes, most of 
whom live in the surrounding country. 

St. Patrick's Church has the following societies: The 
Rosary Society, organized about the year 1858; St. Patrick's 
Total Abstinence Society, also of an early date; the League of 
the Sacred Heart; the Young Ladies' Sodality, and the St. 
Aloysius' Sodality. Aside from their spiritual purposes, these 
societies assist the pastor in temporal affairs. 

One boy of the parish became a priest, and four girls have 
entered the religious life. 

It is asserted by those, who seem to know, that the bell, 
hanging in St. Patrick's Church tower, is the first bell to have 
swung its sweet sound over the Wabash valley. It was pur- 
chased during the pastorate of Father Ryan and everybody, 
Catholic or non-CathoHc, contributed toward it. It was not 
an easy matter to ship that bell to Lagro. A young man, 
named Pasque, drove to Toledo with a yoke of oxen. Here 
he waited for two weeks in vain and concluded to go on to 
Buffalo, where he found the bell. In the meantime the citizens 
of Lagro became uneasy, wondering what could have happened 
to Pasque, and why the bell did not come. At last, one fine 
morning, the old ox team plodded into town with the bell on 
the wagon. It was a great day for Lagro. There was shouting 
and singing and procession and hurrah, until the bell was ring- 
ing in the tower. That bell now hangs in the tower of the 
present St. Patrick's Church. The oldest inhabitant of Lagro 
says: "1 don't believe I would be happy if I didn't hear old 
St. Patrick's bell. That old bell has rung for children that 
have grown old, and it has tolled lots of old friends of mine 
into the cemetery up there." The bell has a clear sweet tone 
and citizens of Lagro say, they have heard its peal nine miles 
distant from the town. 



The Churches, Continued. 211 

LOGANSPORT. 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUl's CHURCH. 

1838. 

The history of St. Vincent de Paul's Congregation begins , 
about the year 1838. The members, at that time, were made 
up mainly of laborers engaged in the construction of the Wabash 
and Erie canal, through this section of the country. Previous 
to that time, the few Catholics at Logansport were attended by 
missionaries, who travelled up and down the Wabash Valley, 
in their missionary work. 

In the year 1838, the Rev. John Claude Francois made the 
first effort to establish a permanent place of worship. He 
purchased five acres of land reserved to the children of Joseph 
Barrow, by a treaty with the Pottawottamies; later, making 
still other purchases, until a total of over twenty-three acres 
had been secured. On this land he erected a story-and-a-half 
log structure, to serve the purposes both of a church and a 
pastoral residence. The congregation increasing rapidly. 
Father Francois found it necessary to secure better accommo- 
dations, and within a year erected a sufficiently large church, 
on Duret street, which supplied the needs of the congregation 
for several years, from 1842 to 1861. 

In the year 1860, lots 151, 152, 153 and 154, in John Tip- 
ton's addition to the town of Logansport, fronting on Spencer 
street, were secured, together with pieces of ground between 
these lots and the Wabash and Erie canal. Upon this site, 
the present St. Vincent de Paul's Church was begun, by the 
laying of the cornerstone in 1860, and its completion and 
dedication in 1863. At this time, the Rev. George A. Hamilton 
was the pastor. The church is in the Gothic style of archi- 
tecture. In the year 1888, Father Campion built an addition 
to the church, at a cost of |1 1,500. The twenty-three acres 
mentioned above, on which the original church was located, 
were sold during the pastorate of Father Hamilton. The 
interior of St. Vincent de Paul's Church is beautifully finished. 
The present pastor. Rev. P. J. Crosson, has made many improve- 
ments including the frescoing of the interior of the church, for 
$1,200; the placing of opulescent stained glass in the windows. 



212 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

for |2,000, a steam heating plant, for |2,400. The seating 
capacity of the church is 700. The church property has a 
debt on it of $6,200. 

The parochial schools were taught by lay teachers, until 
the year 1865, when the Sisters of the Holy Cross took charge. 
As early as 1850, though for a short time only, school was 
taught in the old stone church on Canal street. From 1863, 
the second parochial school was opened in the Cullom building, 
on Second and Market streets, where the Sisters of the Holy 
Cross began to have charge. The present large, three-story 
brick school was erected in 1868, at a cost of $18,000. The 
study halls and class rooms are well furnished. The third 
story of the building is a large hall, giving ample room for 
school and other entertainments. This school possesses a bell 
of historical interest. It was purchased by Father de St. 
Palais, afterwards Bishop of Vincennes, on occasion of his 
visit to Paris, in 1845. It was cast under his special super- 
vision, and was presented by him to St. Vincent de Paul's 
Church. 

What is now Holy Angels' Academy, was formerly known 
as the Walker property, and was secured in the year 1871, for 
a consideration of $18,000. Many alterations were made in 
the building, to make it answer the purpose for which it is now 
used. The Sisters of the Holy Cross also reside in this building 
and from here attend the boys' school on the church grounds. 
A course of eight grades is given the boys and a full high school 
course the girls; although if desired the boys are also taught 
bookkeeping, typewriting and stenography. Ten Sisters have 
charge of 250 children. 

The pastoral residence is a two-story brick building, 
adjacent to the church, on the east side. It was erected in 
the year 1879, during the pastorate of Father Walters, at a 
cost of $5,000. The small, frame house, which formerly stood 
here, was sold and removed to Thirteenth street. Additions 
to the house, with repairs and improvements, including a hot 
water plant, done since Father Crosson's advent, amount to 
$4,700. 

The following is an authentic list of the pastors of St. 
Vincent's Church: Rev. John Claude Francois, from 1838 to 
1841; Rev. August Mary Martin, from 1841 to 1844; Rev. 



The Churches, Continued. 213 

Michael J. Clark, in 1844; Rev. Maurice de St. Palais, in 1845; 
Rev. Francis Fischer, from 1846 to 1848; Rev. P. Murphy, 
from 1848 to 1850; Rev. Patrick McDermott, in 1850; Rev. 
P. O'Connell, in 1852; Rev. Francis Anthony Carius, from 1852 
to 1855; Rev. William Doyle, from 1855 to 1857; Rev. Charles 
Zucker, from May 1857 to August 1859; Rev. George A. Ham- 
ilton, from August 1859 to January 1864; Rev. Bernard Joseph 
Force, from January 1864 to April 1868; Rev. Matthew E. 
Campion, from April 1868 to January 1869; Rev. Jacob Mayer, 
from January 1869 to July 1871; Rev. Francis Lawler, from 
July 1871 to May 1878; Rev. Edward P. Walters, from May 
1878 to June 1883; Rev. Matthew E. Campion, from June 1883 
to December 1899; Rev. Patrick J. Crosson, since February 
1900. 

St. Vincent's is one of the irremovable rectorates of the 
diocese. It has 270 families, numbering 1215 souls. 

This parish has the Sodality of the Living Rosary and the 
Children of Mary; The League of the Sacred Heart; The St. 
Vincent's Cadets and Total Abstinence Society, and the Cath- 
olic Benevolent Legion. 

Three boys of this congregation have become priests, and 
twelve girls have entered religious communities. 

The Church of the Immaculate Conception at Woodville, 
is visited from St. Vincent's Church on the last Sunday of each 
month. The members of this mission are pew-holders at St. 
Vincent's. The Rev. Francis A. King, residing in St. Joseph's 
Hospital, is the assistant pastor of St. Vincent's church. 



PERU. 

ST. CHARLES BORROMEO's CHURCH. 
1838. 

The city of Peru was surveyed in the spring of 1834, and, 
in the summer of the same year, work was let on the construc- 
tion of the canal bed, which brought persons seeking work or 
engaged in trade to this place. The records have preserved 
for us the names of some of the earliest missionaries, visiting 
Peru. The first of these is Rev. Stephen Badin, from 1834 to 



214 Tie Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1837. During the summer of 1835 visits were made by the 
Rev. John A. Corcoran, who died here, and was buried on the 
north banks of the Wabash river between the river and the 
canal; later his remains were removed to the Reyburn cemetery 
at the instance of WilHam D. McGregor, the first white resident 
on the site of Peru; and later still, in 1887, fifty-two years after 
his death, was reinterred in St. Charles' cemetery, on the lot 
of Michael Cannon. The Rev. Matthew Ruff paid a visit in 
1837. From 1837 to 1842 Rev. Michael J. Clark was the pastor 
of Peru, and quasi resident. Rev. Maurice de St. Palais, 
residing at Logansport, attended Peru from 1842 to 1845. 
Rev. Francis Fischer, in 1846, and Rev. Patrick McDermott 
from 1848 to 1852, both from Logansport. Rev. August M. 
Martin, Rev. William Doyle, from 1851 to 1852; Rev. Anthony 
Carius, from 1852 to 1857, who afterwards was a priest in the 
Leavenworth diocese and died chaplain in an Ursuline convent, 
St. Louis, Missouri; Rev. Charles T. Zucker from 1857 to 1860, 
later in the diocese of Albany, New York; Rev. George A. 
Hamilton, who came from Logansport September 1, 1859. 
He purchased several acres, for cemetery purposes. These 
latter priests were supposed to hold services about once a 
month. 

It is a matter of record that on June 19, 1838, for a con- 
sideration of $2.00, William N. Hood and Sophia C. Hood 
conveyed to "William Brute, CathoHc Bishop, and to his 
successors in the holy office, lots 259 and 260, original plat." 
A frame church, 20x40, was erected on lot 259 in 1838. The 
first resident pastor was Rev. Bernard Joseph Force, who was 
appointed as such on April 15, 1860. On November 26, 1860, 
he secured the adjoining lot 261 for |250. The last purchase 
of ground, lots 257 and 258 for |4,400 on March 22, 1901, was 
made by Rev. H. Meissner. 

On January 5, 1864, Rev. Bernard Kroeger was made 
pastor in Peru. Having added a little sacristy to the frame 
church, he proceeded to the erection of a new church of brick 
of Gothic design, 133x60 feet. All but the steeple was com- 
pleted for $21,000, and was dedicated by Bishop Luers on 
December 8, 1867. When Father Kroeger left on October 1, 
1871, the church had hardly any debt. Father Meissner added 
the spire, 183 feet to the church in 1888, which with roof im- 



The Churches, Continued. 215 

provements cost |9,500. He had the church frescoed, and 
put in Munich stained, glass windows, costing together $6,000. 
A pipe organ for |3,000 was added in 1893; the Main Altar was 
remodeled and two new Side Altars erected, in 1884, the latter 
costing |1,050, stations of the Cross |150, pulpit $500. 

Rev. J. H. Guendling, who has been the pastor since July 
4, 1902, had the church redecorated in 1905 and the church 
completely furnished, for a total of $4,900. The steam heating 
plant for church, school and house was put in, in 1902, for 
$6,000. The seating capacity of the church is 600. 

For a number of years school was taught in the church 
itself, but when the present church was occupied in 1867, the 
old church was used for school purposes, until it burned down 
in 1873, when Rev. Lawrence Lamoor proceeded at once to 
the erection of the present school building, three stories, 50x80 
feet, with residence for Sisters annexed, costing $16,000. 

The records show that Rev. Michael J. Clark personally 
taught the school, from 1837 to 1842. During the pastorate 
of Father Force, Gabriel Volkert taught the classes, and "led 
in prayer," during the absence of the pastor. At that time 
the school was on the corner of Fifth and Wabash streets, in 
the pastor's residence. Some time after. Father Force engaged 
Franz Edtler to assist his sister Mary Force, in the care of the 
schools; but Professor Edtler, shortly after, accepted the posi- 
tion of organist of the Fort Wayne Cathedral, which he held 
for twenty-five years. Victor Stephens came next, and was 
succeeded, in 1866, by Theodore Wolfram who resigned in 1867, 
followed by John Schenk, a brilliant young pedagogue, later a 
brother-in-law to Count John Creighton, of Omaha. Thomas 
Miller and Mary Kinney had charge of the school for two years 
from 1866 to 1868. The last of the lay teachers was Professor 
Rudolph Ladislaus Mueller of Zamzow, a native of Pomerania, 
conversing fluently in fifteen different languages, lecturer on 
mathematics in a military academy in Prussia, came to the 
United States lectured east and west on ethnological subjects, 
lost his considerable wealth in mining, would not return home 
where he had been disinherited on account of his conversion 
to the Catholic Faith, taught in St. Vincent's College, West 
Moreland, Pennsylvania, for several terms, when Rev. B. 
Kroeger, a former pupil of his, offered him the position of 



216 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

teacher of the parochial school at Peru. He filled this position 
satisfactorily for three and a half years, when Bishop Dwenger 
secured his services for the seminary of the Sanguinist Fathers 
at Carthagena, Ohio, where he became a member of that 
community and died in 1885. Rev. B. Kroeger in September, 
1869, invited the Ursuline Sisters, four in number, to teach 
the girls in the parish school, the boys being taught by Francis 
G. Horn. Father Lamoor, who succeeded Father Kroeger, in 
October 1871, invited the Sisters of Providence from St. Mary- 
of-the-Woods to take charge of the school, which they did in 
1874; and Frank Horn resigning in September, 1881, these 
Sisters assumed charge of the boys' school also. The usual 
grades are taught by nine Sisters, and the attendance is 261. 

The pastoral residence was erected by Father Force, in 
1861, to which Rev. H. Meissner built an addition in 1890. 
The original cost was $1,700. 

The various organizations of the parish are: The Rosary 
Society, since 1858, for women only, with 100 members; the 
Catholic Knights of America, since 1878, with forty members; 
the Ancient Order of Hibernians, with forty-eight members, 
and the Auxiliary of the same, since 1897, with forty-five 
members; the St. Aloysius' Society, since 1864, with forty-three 
members; the Poor Souls Confraternity, since 1880, with 200 
members; the Young Ladies' Sodality, with 113 members; 
the Third Order of St. Francis, with fifty members; the Knights 
of Columbus, since 1902, with 140 members. The total number 
of souls of the parish is 1,100, constituting 250 families. The 
debt on the church property at present is |4,000. 

The records of the parish note some special events: Rev. 
Anthony Carius was the celebrant of the first High Mass in 
Peru in 1853; Confirmation was administered for the first time 
in 1859; a week's Mission in February 1862, and the first in 
Peru, conducted by Rev. F. X. Weninger, S. J.; Father Meiss- 
ner, having paid the church debt of |16,350 with |5,000 accumu- 
lated interest, made due publication of the fact and the event 
was commemorated in a Jubilee of thanksgiving, on January 
1, 1887; Bishop Dwenger named Father Meissner irremovable 
rector, on January 14, 1887; the third centennial of St. Charles 
Borromeo, November 3, and 4, 1884; the Silver Sacerdotal 
Jubilee of Father Meissner, July 5, 1893. 



The Churches, Continued. 217 

Nine young men of St. Charles'-Parish have become priests, 
and twelve young women have entered rehgious communities. 

St. Charles' Church has had these pastors: Rev. Bernard 
Joseph Force, from April 15, 1860 to January 5, 1864; Rev. 
Bernard Kroeger, from January 5, 1864 to October 1, 1871 
Rev. Lawrence Lamoor from January 1872 to September 1875 
Rev. Henry Meissner, from September 13, 1875 to July 2, 1902 
Rev. John H. Guendling, since July 4, 1902. 

St. Charles' Church has had these assistant priests: Rev. 
Lawrence Lamoor, 1866; Rev. Michael Hanley, 1867 about a 
year; Rev. B. Theodore Borg, from July 1868 till 1869; Rev. 
Patrick Frawiey from 1869 till 1870; Rev. J. H. O'Brien, June 
1870; Rev. Frederick C. Wiechmann, from September 1870 till 
1871 ; Rev. John Sand, from December 25, 1898 to July 5, 1899; 
Rev. John C. Keller, from July 5, 1899 to July 12, 1901; Rev. 
JuHus Seimetz, from July 12, 1901 to June 30, 1905; Rev. 
John Oberholz, from June 30, 1905 till June 24, 1906; Rev. 
Joseph A. Lynn, since June 24, 1906. 

St. Ann's chapel, of the Wabash R. R. in charge of four 
Sisters of St. Francis, Maryville, Mo., is attended from St. 
Charles' Church. 



LAFAYETTE. 

ST. Mary's church. 

1844. 

The city of Lafayette was laid out in 1825, and in 1840 it 
had at least fifteen Catholic families. At their request. Bishop 
de la Hailandiere directed Rev. August Martin, residing at 
Logansport, to visit Lafayette occasionally, and after him 
visits were made also by Rev. C. Francois, as well as by Rev. 
Simon P. Lalumiere, of Terre Haute. In those days Mass 
was celebrated in the houses of the different families. 

In 1843, the Bishop of Vincennes gave Lafayette its first 
resident pastor, in the person of Rev. Michael J. Clark. The 
number of families had now increased to twenty-five, and 
Father Clark rented a one-story brick building, on Fourth 
street just south of the postofifice, in which the services were 



218 The Diocese of Fort JVayne. 

regularly held. In 1844, a site was bought on the corner of 
Fifth and Brown streets, on which in the same year the St. 
Mary and Martha's Church was erected, at a cost of |10,000, 
and was at the time the most imposing and handsomest church 
edifice in all Northern Indiana; known later as St. Joseph's 
Hall, and still existing under the name of Columbian Hall. 
A priest's house was built, in the rear of the church, but was 
soon after destroyed by fire. The pastor, appreciating the 
importance of a parochial school, erected a school building on 
the ruins of the pastoral residence. Father Clark remained 
the energetic pastor at Lafayette for fourteen years until 1857, 
when he went to Illinois, and having charge of a congregation 
in Bloomington, died full of years and good works. 

Rev. Daniel Maloney succeeded Father Clark, but remained 
only one year and a half, when he was given an appointment 
in Indianapolis. Rev. Edmund B. Kilroy came next in 1859, 
and remained until 1861. In 1860, Lawrence B. Stockton 
donated a plot of ground, known as Seminary Hill, for a church, 
school, and parochial residence. The Sisters of Providence 
erected the present St. Ignatius' Academy on these grounds, 
at their own expense, for $20,000. Up to the arrival of the 
Sisters of Providence, the parochial school was taught by lay 
teachers, on Fifth street, with an attendance of about fifty 
pupils. Father Kilroy was appointed chaplain for the United 
States troops, during the Civil War, in 1861, and was succeeded, 
as pastor at Lafayette, by the Rev. George A. Hamilton, a 
cousin of Archbishop Spalding, and a Kentuckian by birth. 
The foundation of the new St. Mary's Church had been laid 
by Father Kilroy, and after five years of indefatigable labor, 
and at a cost of $60,000 over and above that which had been 
expended on the foundation, the church was completed and 
dedicated in 1866. The present pastoral residence was erected 
at an outlay of $8,000. The boys' school, on South street, 
was constructed and paid for by the Community of the Holy 
Cross, of Notre Dame. The Brothers of the Holy Cross were 
the teachers of the boys' school, from 1867 until 1895. 

Father Hamilton also erected St. Ann's Chapel, on Wabash 
avenue; and bought twelve acres of land for the enlargement 
of St. Mary's cemetery. After a most successful pastorate of 
eleven years, Father Hamilton died suddenly on April 8, 1875, 



The Churches, Continued. 219 

with barely time for his assistant, Father HalHnan, to admin- 
ister the sacrament of Extreme Unction. His remains rest 
beneath St. Mary's Church. The Rev. Matthew E. Campion 
was pastor of St. Mary's Church, for about four and a half 
years. During his time two elegant side altars were provided. 
He paid off a large sum of the indebtedness of the church, and 
gave much time and attention to beautifying St. Mary's 
cemetery. At his own request he was relieved of his charge 
here, and was appointed pastor at Laporte. The Rev. Martin 
Noll was appointed in 1880, and came here from Elkhart. He 
arranged at once for a mission in St. Mary's Church, but, the 
mission hardly over, he died of a stroke of apoplexy, within a 
month of his arrival, on June 4, 1880. Rev. Joseph Rademacher 
now was the pastor of St. Mary's Church, from June 1880 to 
June 24, 1883, when he was consecrated Bishop of Nashville. 
He was noted for zeal and prudence and loved by all, for his 
gentle and fatherly disposition. He was popularly known as 
Father Joseph. 

In June 1883, the Rev. Edward P. Walters succeeded 
Father Joseph. In 1887, St. Mary's Church was made an ir- 
removable rectorate and deanery. During his time, Father 
Walters had the church beautifully frescoed, and artistic 
stained glass windows put in. He reduced the debt of |1 5,000 
to |2,500. He died, after an illness of only a few weeks, on 
June 12, 1894. His remains rest in St. Mary's cemetery. On 
August 4, 1894, Rev. John R. Dinnen was appointed rector of 
St. Mary's Church. In the year follovv'ing he purchased the 
boys' school building and grounds from the Community of the 
Holy Cross, at Notre Dame, and within two years paid off the 
old debt of St. Mary's. In the spring of 1898, a steeple was 
added to the church. The interior of the church was wholly 
renovated, a new floor was put in throughout, with new pews, 
stained glass windows in the front of the church; and, besides 
all this, a costly heating plant for heating the church, the 
academy, the boys' school and pastoral residence was installed. 
These improvements were made from June to October 1904, 
at a cost of about f^l4,000. The indebtedness on the church 
property, at the present time, is $6,150. 

St. Mary's Congregation numbers about 255 families or 
965 souls. One hundred and seventy children attend the 



220 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

schools, conducted by eight Sisters of Providence, including a 
high school course. The Confraternity of the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus, with 150 members; the Children of Mary with forty-five; 
the Young Ladies' Sodality of the Immaculate Conception, 
with fifty; the Rosary Society, with fifty-six; the Holy Name 
Society, with forty-five, and the Holy Angels' Society, with 
forty-eight, constitute the organizations of the parish. 

The following were the assistants at St. Mary's Church: 
Rev. Charles Mougin, Rev. Joseph A. Winter, Rev. Burns, 
Rev. Michael M. HalHnan, Rev. John R. Dinnen, Rev. A. M. 
Meile, Rev. John Ryan, Rev. M. Joy, Rev. Constantine Maujay, 
Rev. Patrick J. Crosson, Rev. Patrick F. Roche, Rev. James 
Twigg, Rev. Denis J. Mulcahy, Rev. James H. Werdein, Rev. 
Robert J. Pratt, Rev. Frederick J. Dandurand, Rev. Leopold 
Under, C. PP. S., Rev. Peter J. Quinn, Rev. Peter J. O'Reilly, 
Rev. Frank Jansen, Rev. Charles E. McCabe, Rev. John C. 
Wakefer, Rev. Edward J. Houlihan, Rev. Felix T. Seroczynski, 
Rev. Joseph Lynn, and Rev. F. Joseph Mutch. 



HUNTINGTON. 

SS. PETER AND PAUL'S CHURCH. 
1845. 

Catholicity, in Huntington county, dates back to the year 
1838, when about a half dozen families, chiefly Irish laborers, 
were employed in the construction of the canal. The Rev, 
Julian Benoit was the first offerer of the Holy Sacrifice of the 
Mass, on August 15, 1843, in the residence of the Roche family. 
After Father Benoit, Rev. E. M. Faller and Rev. John Ryan 
attended Huntington, as a station, regularly every three months. 
During this time, Francis Lafontaine, chief of the Miami Indian 
tribe, and his father-in-law, Rushville, donated a piece of 
ground, on which a small log church was erected. The chief 
Lafontaine died April 13, 1847, and was buried near the log 
church. 

The first resident priest at Huntington was Rev. Dr. A. 
Schippert, native of the kingdom of Wuertemberg, and a con- 
vert from lutheranism. He lived in a rented cottage on Cherry 



The Churches, Continued. 221 

street. He procured and laid out a new cemetery at the edge 
of town. His pastorate continued from March 1857 till August 
1858, when on account of ill health he retired to Innsbruck, 
Tyrol. 

His immediate successor was Rev. Frederick Fuchs, a 
native of Munster, Westphalia. He came to Huntington from 
Cincinnati. He immediately built a frame addition to the log 
church, and opened a school. He also erected a priest's house 
of brick, remarking that at last the "fox had found shelter." 
The number of families at this time was one hundred German 
and thirty-nine Irish and French families. After five years 
of successful labor, considerations of health brought about his 
removal to Klaasville. Rev. Martin Kink was pastor, from 
August to December 1863. Bavaria was his native country, 
to which he returned and where he died. In December, 1863, 
Rev. Jacob Mayer was appointed pastor. It was he who built 
the present church, a Gothic structure of brick, 142x58 feet. 
The cost of the building amounted to about |30,000, of which 
he paid all but |9,564. After five years of indefatigable labors, 
he was transferred to Logansport, in August 1868. The next 
pastor was Rev. George Steiner, born in New Ulm, Bavaria, 
April 13, 1836. He gave the School Sisters of Notre Dame 
charge of the school; he completed the church spire and gave 
the steeple a clock; he furnished oil paintings of the fourteen 
stations of the cross, and in 1873, built a large and substantial 
school house of brick, together with a Sisters' residence at a 
cost of |1 7,000. He suffered with hemorrhage of the lungs 
and spent the winter of 1876 to 1877 in Florida, and spring 
and summer of 1877 in Minnesota to recover his health. In 
the meantime. Rev, J. H. Hueser, D. D., had charge of the 
parish. In January, 1880, he resigned as pastor and with his 
faithful friend. Rev. Julius Becks, went to Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, where he died peacefully, on June 1st, of the same year. 

The pastorate of his successor, Rev. J. H. Hueser, D. D., 
extends from January 1880 to August 24, 1906. During this 
time he paid off old debts in the sum of |14,238, and besides 
made repairs and improvements, aggregating |43,000. The 
improvements made were a new pastoral residence for |10,000, 
a main altar $2,300, a chime of three bells |1,350, frescoing of 
the church and renovating the same $6,000, an organ |4,000, 



222 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

ten stained glass windows from the Tyrolese Art Glass Company 
|5,140, tuck pointing brick work of church, and veneering the 
foundation 1 1,300, furnaces for the three buildings $2,500, 
cemetery of twenty acres $4,200. 

The societies of SS. Peter and Paul's Parish are: St. 
Joseph's Society, since 1857, with a membership of seventy-one; 
the Archconfraternity of Christian Mothers, with 160 members; 
St. Aloysius Society, for Young Men, with forty-two members; 
the Young Ladies' Sodality, with 100 members; the Holy Angels' 
Sodality with eighty-eight members. 

The following were assistants at SS. Peter and Paul's: 
Rev. William Geers, from August 1877 to February 1879, now 
a priest of the diocese of Marquette; Rev. F. S. Kunkler, from 
May 1879 till January 1880, later a member of the Congregation 
of the Most Precious Blood; Rev. Adam Buchheit, from June 
2, 1890 till July 19, 1895, attending also to Andrews as a station, 
for three years; Rev. Bruno Soengen, during six months; Rev. 
Francis P. Faust, from December 1895 to October 1897; Rev. 
Ignatius F. Zircher, from June 1902 till April 1905; Rev. 
Joseph Jagemann succeeded Father Zircher, and from October 
1905, Rev. Robert Meyer, C. PP. S. served until the arrival 
of Rev. William B. Hordeman who remained until the ap- 
pointment of Father Hueser's successor. 

Rev. W. C. Miller was appointed pastor at SS. Peter and 
Paul's Church, on October 6, 1906, and holds this position at 
the present time. 

The parish has 205 families, numbering 1102 souls. Five 
School Sisters of Notre Dame conduct the school, teaching the 
eight grades. The number of pupils is 177. The debt on the 
church property amounts to |1,789. 



DECATUR. 

ST. Mary's church, 

1846. 



The town of Decatur was laid out in 1836, and had in it, 
at the time, five houses. In 1838, about a dozen CathoHc 
families had settled in and about Decatur, and, in the spring 
of that year. Rev. Louis Mueller, residing at Fort Wayne, 



The Churches, Continued. 223 

offered the first Mass on record at Decatur, in the house of 
George Fittich. The second priest, whose name appears on 
the records, is Rev. Joseph de Mutzig Hamion assisting at a 
marriage, on January 10, 1841. After him came Rev. Joseph 
Rudolph, who began to collect money for a church, and the 
heavy timbers were being hauled. The fourth visiting pastor 
was Rev. Alphonse Munschina, and the fifth Rev. E. M. Faller. 
The old cemetery in the south part of town was bought in 1842. 
The first church was built in 1846. Up to this time Mass had 
been said in Fittich's house, in the Gloss Tavern and in the 
old Gourt House. About this time also. Rev. Julian Benoit 
came here to say Mass, to preach in English and French, and 
to attend the sick. The first church bell was bought by Father 
Faller at Gincinnati for $60, and it had to be shipped by canal 
to Fort Wayne, and to be hauled from there to Decatur. At 
this time the church grounds consisted of six lots. 

The sixth visiting priest, who was also the first resident 
pastor at Decatur, was the Rev. B. H. Schultes, who built the 
first priest's house in 1852 ; he remained till August 1856. From 
August 1856 till June 1857, Father Faller and Father Rudolph 
again paid visits to Decatur. Rev. Sebastian Ganther, C. PP. 
S. was here from June 1857 till May 1858. After him, in 1858, 
came Rev. L. Schneider, who remained only a few months. 
Rev. Jacob Mayer was pastor from July 1858 to September 
1862. During his pastorate a mission was held, in 1857, by 
Rev. Andrew Kunkler, G. PP. S. and the second, in 1859, by 
Rev. F. X. Weninger, S. J. 

Until 1865, the Rev. A. Heitmann visited Decatur from 
time to time. Rev. Julius Becks came in January 1865, and 
remained one year. The pastorate of Rev. John Wemhoff 
extends from 1866 to September 1872. He collected funds 
for the present church, and laid the foundation. From Sep- 
tember 1872 until February 1877, Rev. Frederick Von Schwedler 
was the pastor. It was he who built the brick church. He 
was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, in February 1877, 
and remained until July 20, 1880, on which date the present 
pastor. Rev. Herman Theodore Wilken, took charge of St. 
Mary's Ghurch at Decatur. In the year of his arrival Father 
Wilken began at once the erection of a new school-house, and 
finished the same in 1881, 



224 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

In 1895, he built a new Sisters' house and added two 
school-rooms to the school-house. These latter buildings cost 
|7,500, and were paid out of the bequest of Henry Dirkes. 
The Sisters of St. Agnes have had charge of the parish school 
in Decatur since 1881. On July 22, 1906, the Sister Superioress 
celebrated the Silver Jubilee of her arrival and her labors, in 
St. Mary's school and parish. 

The parish has 240 families, numbering 1,200 souls. The 
church property consists of ample grounds, a fine brick church, 
a priest's residence with every modern improvements, and a 
commodious brick school-house, with six large school-rooms 
and a brick Sisters' residence with twelve rooms. 

Rev. John Blum was assistant priest from November 
1896 to November 1, 1900. Rev. Lawrence A. Eberle was 
assistant priest, with Portland for a mission, from July 1904 
to July 3, 1905. Rev. John B. Steger, from August 24, 1905 
to September 15, 1906. Rev. George Angermaier, since Sep- 
tember 16, 1906. 

St. Mary's Parish has: The St. Joseph's School Society, 
for married men, with seventy-four members; St. Mary's Altar 
Society, for married women, 156 members; St. Aloysius' Society, 
for single men, sixty-seven members; St. Agnes' Society, for 
single women, seventy members; the Children of Mary, 150 
members; Confraternity of the Sacred Heart, 242 members; 
the Holy Family, 151 members; Confraternity of Mount Carmel, 
930 members; and the Knights of Columbus, with 130 members. 

The debt on the church property at the present time is 
|585. The pastor intends, during the current year, to make 
additions to the school and Sisters' residence, the cost of which 
is estimated at $7,000. At the present time the school is 
taught by six Sisters of St. Agnes with an attendance of 260 
children. 



ST. JOHN, LAKE COUNTY. 

ST. JOHN evangelist's CHURCH. 

1847. 

The priests who have had charge of St. John's Church at 
St. John from 1839 till the present time are as follows: Rev. 
Francis Fischer from 1839 till the end of 1843; Rev. Anthony 



The Churches, Continued. 225 

Carius from 1843 till July 1849; Rev. Francis Cointet, C. S. C, 
from April 1850 till January 1, 18*51 ; Rev. B. J. Force, C. S. C, 
from 1851 till the beginning of 1857; Rev. M. P. Rooney, 
C. S. C, and Rev. E. B. Kilroy, C. S. C, from beginning of 1857 
till June 1857; Rev. Andrew Tusch, from June 1857 to March 
1858; Rev. Jacob Mayer, from March 1858 till September 1, 
1858; Rev. B. Rachor, from September 1, 1858 till October 
1866; Rev. Christian Schilling, C. S. C, Rev. M. Sherer, Rev. 
M. P. Wehrle, and Rev. Henry Koenig, from October 1866 till 
November 1870; Rev. B. Rachor, from November 1868 till 
October 1870; Rev. Anthony Heitmann, from October 1870 
till July 1, 1906; Rev, Charles F. Keyser, from July 1, till 
November 21, 1906; Rev. A. M. Buchheit, since November 21, 
1906. 

Across Lake county, situated in the northwest corner of 
the State of Indiana, the watershed, extending from east to 
west, separates the St. Lawrence basin from the Mississippi 
valley. This line enters the county from the west, in St. John 
township, passing north of the headwaters of West creek, 
which runs very close to St. John and here takes a southwesterly 
course. In the early days the locality was called Western 
Prairie, and also Prairie West, but when a postoffice was estab- 
Hshed the settlers, at a public meeting, gave it the name St. 
John. This was done partly because the name of the first 
German settler was John Hack, who immigrated, in September 
1837, with a large family. John Hack's house was located 
about one mile southeast of the present church. St. John 
township, not only almost exclusively Catholic but also German, 
has in it three churches: One at St. John, the other at Dyer, 
and the third at Schererville. St. John the Evangelist's Church, 
in St. John, is the mother church of all the other churches in 
Lake county. Until 1856 it was known as "HI. Kreuz Auffmd- 
ung Kirche," as we find it recorded in the old baptismal record, 
over the signature of F. Cointet, C. S. C, under date of January 
4, 1847. On the same page of that record we find that the 
Rev. A. Carius blessed the cemetery, comprising about one 
and a quarter acres. 

Until 1839 Father Fischer, from Chicago, visited St. John, 
as a station, twice a month celebrating Mass in John Hack's 
house. The same Father also visited Baileytown, an Indian 



226 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

settlement. In that same year, the congregation, numbering 
about ten families, built a little frame church, 18x24 feet, on 
John Hack's land, about a half mile southeast of the present 
church. Bishop de St. Palais furnished all the money for 
material and labor on this church. The lumber and other 
building material was transported from Chicago with ox teams, 
each trip requiring about one week's time. In 1842, in conse- 
quence of some trouble, a schism divided the parish, some 
members siding with John Hack, but the majority with the 
priest. The Hack faction retained the church, but Father 
Carius held divine service for the loyal party, in the house of 
John Thiel. In 1844 or 1845, the eighteen loyal famihes built 
a log church, the logs, the lumber and the labor for which 
were donated and |269.14 expended in cash. Bishop de St. 
Palais administered Confirmation in this church in 1846, the 
first confirmation in Lake county. 

It was under the pastorate of Father Force, that the 
present brick church was erected. It measured 90x52 feet, 
with a height of 25 feet; it cost from |7,000 to |8,000. With 
the exception of putting new shingles on roof, no improve- 
ments whatever have been made since. At the time of the 
building of the church, the congregation numbered about 120 
families. The dedication took place, on October 20, 1856, as 
we see it recorded in the church books over the signature of 
E. Sorin, who signs himself V. G. The record says that Father 
Force was the pastor, that Rev. F. Mayer, C. S. C, celebrated 
the Mass, that the same preached in German and that Father 
Sorin preached in English, on the occasion. 

The first parochial school was opened in St. John, in 1846, 
by the Brothers and Sisters of the Holy Cross, from Notre 
Dame. Father Tusch, on August 2, 1857, makes this record 
on the books in regard to the school: "109 Kinder in der 
Schule, and der Schwester Conceptschen bezahlt $15.00." 
With the beginning of the Civil War the parochial school was 
closed, and was continued thereafter as a public or district 
school. Having rented the public school building for $150 per 
year, the congregation again has a parochial school, since 
September 4, 1903. Two Sisters of St. Francis, from Lafayette, 
teach the school, which has an attendance of seventy-nine 
children. 



The Churches, Continued. 227 

The church property consists_of three pieces of land, in 
all ten acres; four acres, where the present church stands, on 
which also is situated the old priest's house a two-story building 
erected in 1859, in which Father Heitmann continues to live, 
and also the cemetery; across the road, opposite the church, 
two acres on which stands now the first little church, remodeled 
for a Sisters' residence; the third piece of land, four acres, is 
located, about a half mile southeast of the present church, on 
which stood the first church and where also was the first little 
cemetery. The present pastor is living in a rented house, at 
a distance of about one block from the church. St. John's 
parish has a Rosary Society, for married women, with twenty 
members; a Sodality for single women, sixty-five members; a 
Sodality for single men, thirty members; the Central Verein, 
eighty-one members; Catholic Foresters, sixty-two members, 
and the Columbian League, with thirty-six members. 

The congregation consists of eighty-nine families, number- 
ing 406 souls. Father Buchheit is about to make repairs and 
improvements, which have become necessary, on the church, 
to cost about |500. He also had an architect to prepare the 
plans and specifications for a new pastoral residence; which 
will contain about twelve rooms, is to be constructed a frame 
building, will cost about $4,500. 



FORT WAYNE. 

ST. mary's church. 
1848. 

In 1848, thirty German families, who were members of St. 
Augustine's Church, bought some lots on the corner of Lafay- 
ette and Jefferson streets for |1,700. This was the inaugura- 
tion of St. Mary's Church, for the German Catholics. An 
evidence of the fact that these people were in earnest, is seen 
when five men mortgaged their farms to pay for the lots. The 
first building erected measured 32x64 feet, and was completed 
on the 29th of November, 1848. This building afterwards 
served as a girls' school. The Rev. Edward M. Faller was the 
pastor of the new parish. At the same time a small one story 



228 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

frame house was built to serve as a pastoral residence. A 
frame school house, that served the Germans, when still mem- 
bers of St. Augustine's parish, was moved in 1849 from Calhoun 
street to the rear of the pastoral residence. 

Bishop de St. Palais, of Vincennes, visited the new parish 
in 1850 to administer Confirmation and gave the church |500. 
The first edifice served for church purposes until 1858, when 
the erection of a more commodious building was begun. In 
1857, the Rev. Joseph Weutz was made the successor of Father 
Faller, who had been transferred to New Albany. The corner- 
stone for the new St. Mary's Church was laid by Bishop Luers, 
in the summer of 1858, and on the second of November, 1859, 
the church, 133x66 feet, was dedicated by him. The erection 
of the church entailed an expense of |30,000. During the 
absence of Father Weutz in Europe, in 1871, Rev. F. Von 
Schwedler had charge and completed the spire. Father Weutz's 
assistant priests were, in turn. Revs. A. Heitmann, A. Young 
and B. T. Borg. 

Rev. J. Weutz resigned the pastorate of St. Mary's in 
1872, and Bishop Dwenger appointed the Rev. Joseph Rade- 
macher, with Rev. Charles Steurer as his assistant. Seven 
years later. Father Rademacher was transferred to Lafayette. 
Rev. J. H. Oechtering was appointed pastor of St. Mary's 
on July 14, 1880. He had for assistants, successively, the 
Revs. C. Steurer, C. Ganzer, L. A. Moench, C. M. Romer, R. 
Denk and G. Hottenroth. 

Half past one o'clock in the afternoon of January 13, 1886, 
will ever remain memorable in the history of St. Mary's. At 
that hour the boiler, beneath the church, from some cause 
not known, exploded. The church now presented a disastrous 
scene of wreck and ruin. The shock of that explosion was 
felt over the city. The fireman was killed and a little girl, 
passing the church at the time, was struck and instantly killed 
by a door blown from its hinges. But the energetic pastor 
and his generous people were not discouraged. An architect 
of Cleveland, at once received orders to draw the plans of a 
new and better building. On the 11th of July, 1886, the corner- 
stone of the new church was laid by Bishop Dwenger. The 
present St. Mary's Church, including decorations and furniture, 
cost |100,000. It was dedicated on the third Sunday of Advent, 



The Churches, Continued. 229 

1887, by Bishop Dwenger, amidst the rejoicings of a vast 
concourse of people. Bishop Rademacher, of Nashville, and 
Very Rev. Abbelen, of Milwaukee, took part in the solemnities. 
The seating capacity of the church, exclusive of galleries, is 
950. Its style of architecture is Gothic, the length being 195 
feet, the width 68 feet, and the height of the middle nave at 
the intersection of the arches is 66 feet. The transept has a 
length of 84 feet and a width of 34 feet. Each nave ends in a 
sanctuary of octagonal form. The front of the building is 
flanked on each side by towers about 120 feet in height. The 
main steeple in the middle, including the cross has a height of 
237 feet. The Crucifixion Group ever the main altar is a work 
of art. St. Mary's Academy, a handsome building, took the 
place of the old school house in the year 1892, at a cost of 
$20,000. 

In the year 1903 a large building was erected for a boys' 
school, on the two lots opposite the church. On the ground 
floor are six school rooms. The second story contains a mag- 
nificent hall, dining-room, etc. In the basement are meeting 
and recreation rooms for the young men, a gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, billiards, library and reading rooms and baths. The 
cost was |30,000. In the same year a steam heating plant 
was provided. 

The priest's house, a frame structure, was bought with 
the lot on which it stands, in 1886, for |5,000. An addition 
cost |1,800. The first house was a little frame building erected 
in 1846; the second, was of brick costing $5,000, but it was 
destroyed by the explosion in 1886. 

A house for the organist, a two-story brick building, 
situated west of the boys' school, cost about |3,000. A boiler 
house south of the church built of stone and brick, 30x20 feet, 
cost about $1,200. 

Ten boys of the parish have become priests and forty-five 
girls have become Sisters. 

Priests who served St. Mary's Congregation : Rev. Edward 
M. Faller was pastor from 1848 till 1849; Rev. Joseph Weutz, 
from 1857 till 1872; Rev. Joseph Rademacher, from 1872 till 
1880; Rt. Rev. Mgr. John H. Oechtering, V. G., has been 
pastor since 1880. 

St. Mary's Church has the following societies: St. Charles 



230 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Borromeo Mutual Benefit Society, with 166 members, was 
organized in 1859, for men; Catholic Knights of America, with 
forty-one members, and Benevolent Legion, with eighty-seven 
members, are insurance societies; St. Aloysius' Society for 
young men, with 189 members, has existed since 1868; St. 
Stanislaus' Society, for boys up to their sixteenth year, with 
sixty-three members; St. Rose's Young Ladies' Society, estab- 
lished in 1 868, is an altar society with 1 79 members ; the Children 
of Mary, for girls up to their sixteenth year with seventy-five 
members; the Holy Rosary Society for married women, with 
367 members, was organized in 1858; the Altar Society, for 
married women, was established in 1865; the Society of the 
Holy Childhood, for the school children; the Society for the 
Propagation of the Faith. Two school societies, the one for 
men, the other for women, organized for the support of the 
schools. 

The parish has 488 families, and the total number of souls 
is 2,196. The two school buildings, with ten school rooms, in 
charge of twelve School Sisters of Notre Dame, are attended by 
535 pupils. The debt on the church property is |9,010. 



MISHAWAKA. 

ST. Joseph's church, 

1848. 

The history of this parish dates back to the year 1833, 
when the celebrated Father Badin visited these parts. How- 
ever, in 1844, Very Rev. Edward Sorin, C. S. C, established 
a regular order of services for Mishawaka, and for a few years 
Mass was celebrated in the homes of Edward Mulligan, George 
Smith and Jeremiah Luce. From 1848 until 1855, a room in 
the residence on the southeast corner of Lawrence and Margaret 
streets was arranged for divine service, and to it the name was 
given, "Holy Angels Church." In the latter year, 1855, a 
small frame building, for church purposes, was erected on the 
north-west corner of Grove and Sarah streets, but this building 
was destroyed by fire in 1860. The priests who attended 
Mishawaka, prior to 1857, were all members of the Congrega- 
tion of the Holy Cross. Their names were: Very Rev. 
Edward Sorin, Revs. F. Cointet, J. Gouesse, R. A. Shortis, 



The Churches, Continued. 231 

W. Masterson, C. Schilling, A. Fourmount, M. P. Rooney, 
B. J. Force, Alexius Granger, E. B. Kilroy, Thomas Flynn and 
M. Prendergast. 

The Rev. B. Mager was the first resident pastor at Mish- 
awaka, from 1857 for a period of eighteen months. In 1859, 
Rev. Henry Koenig was appointed, who began at once to 
collect funds for a new church. The Civil War brought on 
hard times, and Father Koenig made collecting trips into Ohio, 
not without success. At this time, Mishawaka had about 
thirty-four Catholic families. The new church was a brick 
building with stone trimmings, with a seating capacity of 
about 300, and was erected by Father Koenig, on the corner 
of Third and Spring streets, where the school-house now stands, 
at a cost of about |8,000. Bishop Luers laid the corner stone 
in June, and dedicated the church on December 8, 1861. The 
name of the church was now changed from Holy Angels' 
Church to St. Joseph's Church. This church served the con- 
gregation, as a place of worship, until October 22, 1893. In 
the old church 1826 baptisms were administered, 284 couples 
were married, and from it 580 were buried. 

The Rev. August Bernard Oechtering took charge of St. 
Joseph's Church, Mishawaka, on May 17, 1867. He found it 
indebted for |3,000, and the furnishings of the church poor. 
He paid off most of this debt. during two years, and 1869 pur- 
chased the property on the corner of Fourth and Mill streets, 
for |3,200. 

As far back as 1854, a French lady taught the few Catholic 
children in a building, at the southeast corner of Main and 
First streets. Later, the Sisters of the Holy Cross located in 
Mishawaka, and would have established St. Mary's Academy 
in what is now Battell Park, but fanaticism and bigotry of a 
violent type drove them away. After this, until 1864, school 
was taught, by different gentlemen, in the vestry room of St. 
Joseph's Church. In that year, a brick school building was 
erected, on Spring street, in the rear of the church. A frame 
school -house was built on Fourth street, in 1870, and in 1876 
an addition was made to the brick school-house, and still later 
another school was built on Mill street. 

Prior to 1885, additional improvements were made in the 
frescoing of the church, in the purchase of a pulpit and of three 



232 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

large bells. Ground for the Catholic Cemetery had been 
bought in 1865, and here too, many improvements were made. 
A residence for the Sisters, known as St. Agnes Convent, as 
well as the pastor's residence, the latter on the corner of Fourth 
and Spring streets, were provided. Up to this time the pastor 
resided in the frame dwelling, now occupied by the janitor. 

The Silver Jubilee of Father Oechtering, in 1886, was 
celebrated with particular solemnity. Bishop Dwenger of 
Fort Wayne, Bishop Rademacher of Nashville, many priests 
and distinguished laymen took part. Many other memories 
cling to the old St. Joseph's Church. From this church went 
forth seven young men as priests, two young men for the 
religious state of life, four ecclesiastical students and seventeen 
young ladies, as Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ. The present 
Chancellor of the diocese of Fort Wayne, the Rev. Simon M. 
Yenn, was one of the boys of old St. Joseph's. 

The first steps, toward the erection of the new church, 
were taken in November 1885, when a building fund was 
started, and in five years |22,000 had accumulated. The new 
church was to be Gothic in style, of white brick with lime- 
stone trimmings; and the dimensions were to be 151x60i feet; 
height of ceiling 50 feet and elevation of the spire 163 feet. 
On April 20, 1891, Father Oechtering "turned the first shovel 
full of earth, and the building committee following in the 
order of the seniority," and on August 30th, in the presence 
of 10,000 people, the corner stone was laid. Bishop Rademacher, 
of Nashville, officiating, and Rev. Thomas E. Walsh, President 
of Notre Dame University, preaching the English and Rev. 
D. Wermers of Detroit, the German sermon. The new church 
was dedicated, with becoming solemnity, on October 22, 1893, 
by Bishop Rademacher, now Bishop of Fort Wayne. Very 
Rev. A. Morrissey, of Notre Dame, and Rev. J. H. Oechtering 
of Fort Wayne, preached the English and the German sermons. 
The cost of the church and furnishings amounted to |65.000. 
It may be remarked, that the artistic communion railing, the 
pulpit and the altars were built by Mr. Erb and his sons, and 
that the pipe organ was built by Mr. Louis H. Vandinter; 
these gentlemen being members of the congregation. 

The school accommodations proved to be entirely unsat- 
isfactory by this time. A new school building was determined 



The Churches, Continued. 233 

on, which was to be a two-story. and basement building of 
brick and stone, with self Supporting steel truss, slate roof. 
The dimensions were to be 136x70 feet with a transept of 80 
feet. It was to have eight class-rooms, a chapel to seat 300 
people, and a hall accommodating 700. The basement to be 
a gymnasium and recreation room. The cost of this building 
was estimated at |40,000. Rev. John H. Guendling officiated 
at the laying of the corner stone, and Rev. John Cavanaugh, 
C. S. C, delivered the sermon on education, June 22, 1902. 
On Sunday, May 3, 1903, the building was dedicated by Bishop 
Alerding, who in the forenoon also administered confirmation 
to a class of 75. 

The energetic, untiring pastor, Father Oechtering, departed 
this life on December 28, 1902, and was succeeded by Rev. 
Louis Aloysius Moench, on February 1, 1903, as Vicar pro tem. 
and on June 29, of the same year, was named irremovable 
rector. He found a debt of $37,000 on the church property, 
and he found also that the |40,000 school building, though 
under roof, was not completed and not furnished. The church 
grounds had to be graded, and cement sidewalks had to be 
constructed around the entire square. After four years of his 
pastorate, we find that he has made all the improvements 
necessary and that the indebtedness of the church property 
has been reduced to |1 7,450. There are 378 families and the 
number of souls is 1700. 

Seven Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ teach the school 
attended by 350 pupils. The Sisters reside in the St. Agnes' 
Convent, on Fourth street, opposite the church square. This 
property was a donation by Mrs. PhilUps. 

St. Joseph's Church has the Holy Rosary Society for 
married women, with 220 members; the Young Ladies' Sodal- 
ity, with 125 members; the Sacred Heart Sodality, for girls 
under 16, with 54 members; St. Leo's Society for Boys, with 
50 members; St. Aloysius' Society, for Young Men, with 35 
members; St. Joseph's Society, for Men, with 175 members; 
the Catholic Knights of America, with 45 members; the 
Catholic Order of Foresters, with 60 members; the Women's 
CathoHc Order of Foresters, with 35 members, and the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, with 35 members, and the Catholic Benevo- 
lent Legion. 



234 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Mr. William P. O'Neil, "the historian of St. Joseph's 
Congregation," has our thanks for the information given. 

The assistant priests at St. Joseph's have been, in the 
order given: Rev. Peter Schmitt, Rev. Michael P. Louen, 
Rev. John C. Keller, Rev. Charles Stuer, Rev. Lawrence A. 
Eberle, Rev. Joseph Jagemann, Rev. L. Jungblut, and Rev. E. 
Werling, since June 8, 1907. 

MICHIGAN CITY. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH. 

1849. 

In all probability, the ancient and mysterious establish- 
ment known as A-ber-Cronk at the mouth of Trail Creek was 
a trading post for exchange for the Indians. It is here where 
Michigan City is located, and was early known as Baileytown, 
so called after Joseph Bailey, a trader and agent for the Amer- 
ican Fur Company, about the year 1832. The directory for 
1844 mentions Rev. M. de St. Palais in connection with Mich- 
igan City. The church records of St. Mary's Church name the 
following early missionaries: Rev. R. A. Shortis, C. S. C, 
1847-1852;Rev.C.Schilling,C.S.C., 1852-1853; Rev. A. Granger, 
C. S. C; Rev. F. Cointet, C. S. C; Rev. M. P. Rooney, C. S. C; 
Rev. R. Wallace, C. S. C,; Rev. B. J. Force, C. S. C, from 
January 1853 to October 1854; and Father SchilUng again, 
from October 1854 to March 1855. Rev. Thomas Flynn, 
C. S. C, paid visits from March 1855 to December 7, 1856; 
Rev. E. B. Kilroy and Rev. B. Mager to October 25, 1857; 
on this date the Rev. Paul Gillen, C. S. C, was appointed the 
first resident pastor of Michigan City. 

The first church was remodeled from a small warehouse 
to the size of about 20x30 feet, in 1849; it was situated on the 
corner of Washington and Second streets. This structure was 
replaced by a new frame church in 1854, and it is supposed 
was erected while Father Gillen was paying occasional pastoral 
visits here; the church was called St. Ambrose's Church. The 
Catholics of these early days were Irish, employed on the 
construction of the Michigan Central railroad. Gradually, 
however, German Catholics also settled in and about Michigan 
City. Rev. Martin Sherer, who resided at Laporte from 1854 
to 1858, frequently visited Michigan City, and at his invitation 



The Churches, Continued. 235 

the Rev. F. X. Weninger, S. J., gave a mission for the Ger- 
mans. He induced the Germans to build a church of their 
own, in 1859, on the corner of Washington and Fourth streets. 

In 1856 a parochial school was established alongside of 
St. Ambrose's Church, and a small frame dwelling for the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. The priest's house, a small dwelling 
of three or four rooms, stood east of the church. The Catholic 
population being too small to maintain two separate parishes, 
the Rev. E. B. Kilroy was made pastor of both, while Father 
Sherer attended the Germans, from Laporte. Both Father 
Kilroy and Father Sherer were succeeded by Rev. George 
Steiner, as pastor of both churches from October 25, 1860 till 
September 21, 1864. Exclusive of labor and material donated, 
the cost of St. Ambrose's Church, school, Sisters' house and 
pastoral residence, did not exceed $1,500. The other, St. 
Mary's Church, costing |1, 52 1.34 had a debt of |940.04, when 
Father Steiner took charge. The so-called trustees created 
many difficulties for the pastor, in their anxiety to manage 
the finances of the parish. However there was not much to 
manage, when we see from the church books that the total 
receipts for the year 1861, amounted to $264.62; for 1862, 
$325.78; and for three months of 1863, $46.20. On August 1, 
1863, Bishop Luers attended a meeting of the parish, at which 
certain rules for the government of both parishes were adopted.* 

Rev. Julius Becks succeeded Father Steiner, and was 
pastor of both St. Ambrose and St. Mary's Churches, cele- 
brating Mass in both churches, on every Sunday. This order 
of things continued until November 1, 1867, when both con- 
gregations were united, and began the construction of the 
present church, on Tenth and Buffalo streets. The number of 
souls, at this time, was from 120 to 150 families. The present 
St. Mary's Church, the school, the Sisters' Convent and the 
parochial residence stand on the ground purchased in 1852, 
for a cemetery. In this cemetery were buried the Catholics 
of Monon, Rensselaer, Lacrosse, Valparaiso, and Chesterton. 
Encroaching on the city limits this cemetery was condemned, 
and Father Becks purchased ten acres of ground to the south 

*One of the rules adopted was: " Dass die Gemeinde ihren Seelsorger die Befoerderung ihrer 
geistlichen sowohl als auch materiellen Vortheile gaenzlich ueber lasse und in ihm den Vorstand. 
Secretaer, Schatzraeister, kurz den Gemeinde-oder-Kirchen-Vor-Neben-Hinter-und-Beisteher erkenne. 
The minutes of the meeting were signed, Rev. G. Steiner. 



236 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of the present city cemetery. The remains of all the buried 
were removed to the new cemetery, which was consecrated by 
Bishop Luers, in 1865. Of the four acres of the old cemetery 
one full block and a three-quarter block were retained for 
church purposes. 

St. Mary's Church was built in 1868, and dedicated by 
Bishop Luers in 1869. The cost of the church and of the 
frame priest's house was |23,450. The church is Gothic, 
having simple but neat decorations; the debt in 1885 was 
|5,965. Father Becks built the present church and the old 
priest's house. 

The present pastor, Rev. John Bleckmann, was appointed 
to succeed Father Becks, on February 18, 1885. He has made 
many purchases and improvements, such as a new pipe organ 
for |1,500, new side altars for |800, frescoing of the church 
for |1,460, new pews for $1,365, gas and electric lighting with 
fixtures for |1,935, steam heating plant for |1,532, chime of 
church bells for $1,230. The seating capacity of the church 
is 600. 

Father Bleckmann erected the school buildings in 1886; 
the dimensions are 90x70 feet, with the Sisters' residence of 
fifteen rooms to the rear of the school building, at a cost of 
|23,372. The sum of $2,675 has been spent since, on the 
school, for various improvements. The Sisters of the Holy 
Cross taught the school up to 1897, when the Sisters of Notre 
Dame took charge. The eight grades and three years of high 
school are being taught by ten Sisters, with an attendance of 
366 pupils. In 1905, Father Bleckmann erected a new pas- 
toral residence with all modern conveniences, at a cost of about 
$17,000, to replace the old frame building, which had become 
entirely unfit for use. Other improvements, such as grading 
of the grounds and cement walks around church, school, and 
priest's house, were made in the same year. The debt on the 
church property is $26,341. The pastor's calculations are, 
that this debt will be wiped out in five years. 

St. Mary's Church has the following societies: St. Joseph's 
Aid Society, since 1862; St. Joseph's Altar Society, since 1876; 
Foresters, German and English Courts, since 1887; St. Aloy- 
sius' Sodality, for Boys; The Rosary Society for Married 
Women, since 1856; Ancient Order of Hibernians, since IJ 



The Churches, Continued. 237 

Knights of Columbus, since 1904; the Sodality of the Immacu- 
late Conception, with one hundred and twenty members, since 
1876; the Children of Mary, with sixty-five members, and the 
Purgatorian Society, with eighty members. The Altar Society 
furnished new altars, pulpit and statuary. The Young Ladies' 
Sodality and the Rosary Society have done much towards 
furnishing both the church and the pastoral residence. St. 
Mary's Parish has 454 families, numbering 2531 souls. The 
parish has given the Church six priests, and, various religious 
communities, sixteen sisters. 

Father Becks' assistants were Rev. A. Ellering and Rev. 
C. Romer. Father Bleckmann had the following assistants: 
Rev. J. H. Werdein, from July 1888 to July 1890; Rev. E. J. 
Wrobel, from July 1890 to January 15, 1891; Rev. Gregory 
Zern, from June 21, 1895 until September 24, 1896; Rev. 
George Schramm, for a short time; Rev. Herman Juraschek, 
from September 24, 1896 until July 1897; Rev. George Horst- 
mann, till August 1900; Rev. Thomas Jansen, till February 
1903; Rev. WiHiam C. Miller, till August 28, 1906; Rev. John 
Oberholz, till June 8, 1907, when Rev. John Bleckmann suc- 
ceeded him. 

On the fourth Sunday of each month, the pastor of St. 
Mary's celebrates Mass for the Catholic inmates of the State 
Prison, at Michigan City. 



NIX SETTLEMENT. 

ST. Catharine's church. 
1850. 

The first immigrants in this part of the country were the 
Nix family, in 1847. Mass was celebrated, as early as 1848, 
in the house of Jacob Nix until, in 1850, a small frame church 
was erected, about three quarters of a mile southwest of the 
present church. The priests, who officiated in the house of 
Mr. Nix and in the first church, were Rev. E. M. Faller, Rev. A. 
Schippert, Rev. Frederick Fuchs, Rev. Jacob Mayer and Rev. 
Henry V. Schaefer, who came either from Fort Wayne, or 
Huntington. The church burned down, in 1868, and then 
divine services were held in the school house, near the site of 
the old church. Two acres of land were donated for church 



238 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

and cemetery, by George Bemer. Rev. Theodore Vander- 
Poel, residing at Areola, had charge of Nix Settlement and 
Roanoke, at that time. On July 19, 1869, the corner stone 
of the new brick church, 56x34 feet, was laid by Father Schaefer ; 
Rev. George Steiner preached the sermon. Rev. William 
Woeste, and after him Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, C. PP. S., were 
resident pastors, at Roanoke, in rented houses, visiting Nix 
Settlement, the former twice a month, the latter every Sunday. 
Rev. W. Conrad Miller was the first resident pastor, at Nix 
Settlement, from October 1881 till 1883. In 1882, he erected 
the present priest's house, at the side of St. Catharine's Church. 
Prior to 1882, Father Miller resided at Roanoke, after that 
time at Nix Settlement. His successors were: Rev. F. J. 
Lambert, 1883 till 1884; Rev. PhiUp Guethoff, from 1884 to 
1889; Rev. Edward J. Boccard, from 1889 till 1895; Rev. 
Bruno Soengen, from December 1895 till June 23, 1905; Rev. 
John Biedermann, since June 30, 1905. 

The first brick church was defective in its construction, 
and was condemned, upon expert examination, by Bishop 
Rademacher. The building was accordingly torn down, and 
in its stead and on the same site, a larger and better church 
was erected. The dimensions of this new and present church 
are 36x84 feet; it is built of brick and has Bedford stone trim- 
mings, the style of architecture is Gothic. The interior is 
finished in quarter-sawed, red oak, and is furnished with three 
Gothic altars, white and richly gilt, confessionals of oak, the 
pews of the same material, all oil finished. The seating capacity 
is 300. The windows are stained glass, and the frescoing is 
artistic. Bishop Rademacher being sick at the time, the 
corner stone was laid by the Vicar General, Very Rev. J. H, 
Guendling, on Trinity Sunday, 1899, and was dedicated on 
October 8, of the same year, in the presence of fully 3,000 
people, by Rev. J. H. Oechtering, of Fort Wayne. The church 
was built during the pastorate of Father Soengen, and the cost 
of it was 110,000 with a debt of $1,700. 

Fathers Guethoff and Boccard contributed their share, 
during their pastorates, towards the improvement of the church 
property. The present pastor. Father Biedermann, installed 
in November 1905, a most satisfactory method for heating the 
church. The population of the parish at the present time is 



Tie Churches, Continued. 239 

thirty-four families, and a total of 166 souls. Other improve- 
ments, made by Father Biedermann, of a porch to the pastoral 
residence and of cement walks for the house and church were 
found necessary. 

St. Catharine's Church has St. Joseph's SodaHty for married 
men, and St. Ann's Sodality, for married women, both since 
1883; St. Mary's Sodality for single women, and St. Aloysius' 
Sodality, for single men. One child of the parish was ordained 
priest, in 1902. The total membership of the societies is eighty- 
three. 



BESANCON. 

ST. LOUIS' CHURCH. 
1851. 

French immigrants made up the settlement in Jackson 
township of Allen county, now called Besancon, about 1840. 
At that time it was known as New France. The thrifty 
settlers made, of the swamp land, the best farm land in Allen 
county. 

It was Rev. A. Bessonies, who first attended to their 
spiritual wants. He said Mass in the log house of Joseph 
Dodone. When, on January 14, 1851, Gideon Dickerson 
donated four acres of land to Bishop de St. Palais, a neat 
church was at once erected by Father Bessonies and placed 
under the patronage of St. Louis. Father Bessonies' labors 
here ceased, when the diocese of Fort Wayne was established, 
at the close of 1857. After him, Rev. Julian Benoit attended 
New France regularly, until 1864. He was held in great esteem 
and reverence by the people of New France. His picture is 
seen upon the walls of nearly every home; and, when the ceiling 
of the present church was first decorated, the parishoners 
insisted that the artist paint Father Benoit's portrait among 
the figures of the angels, on the sanctuary ceiling. Rev. Grevin 
was the first resident pastor. He built the first priest's house, 
a modest cottage, costing only a few hundred dollars. The 
four immediate successors of Father Grevin remained less than 
two years. They were: Rev. J. C. Carrier, C. S. C. from 
April to November 1866; Rev. F. M. Ruiz from November 
1866 to April 1867; Rev. A. de Montaubricq from April to 



240 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

December 1867 and Rev. Vandevennet from December 1867 
to October 1868. Rev. A. Mignault then had charge of the 
parish until January 1, 1870, when the Rev. A. Adam, whom 
the well known Father Sorin of Notre Dame brought with him 
from France, became the resident pastor of St. Louis' Church. 

About this time. New France received its present name 
Besancon, owing to the fact that a large portion of the first 
settlers emigrated from the vicinity of the city of that name, 
in France. Father Adam, perceiving that the little frame 
church was becoming much too small for his growing congre- 
gation (then numbering 600 souls), and realizing that the people 
were now able to erect a more stately and substantial edifice, 
began to collect funds towards building a new church. Father 
Mignault had laid the foundation. When completed the church 
cost |10,000. The parishoners furnished timber for the most 
of the lumber, and the bricks were burnt a few rods from where 
the church stands. Father Adam contrived a unique way of 
raising funds for the new church. He asked the head of each 
family to raise a calf until it would be three years old; and his 
request was complied with. Each donated calf was marked 
by the pastor, as soon as it came into the world. Then on a 
given date a public sale was advertised, to which prospective 
buyers came from far and wide. The sale of these cattle netted 
over |3,000. In 1875 Father Adam received permission from 
Bishop Dwenger to return to France. 

The Rev. W. Demers, C. S. C, was appointed to succeed 
Father Adam, in 1875. A year later Rev. Constantine Maujay 
was made pastor, and served for two years. In 1880 Rev. 
Felix Veniard, C. S. C. took charge and liquidated the indebted- 
ness of |3,000 on the church. Of this amount Father Benoit 
contributed |500. Father Veniard was longest the resident 
pastor of St. Louis' Church, having served from 1880 till his 
death in 1893. For the space of one year Besancon was 
attended every Sunday from the Cathedral, at Fort Wayne, 
by Rev. Charles Guendling and Rev. William J. Quinlan, of 
whom the latter built the present priest's house. Father 
Quinlan collected over $4,000 before the house was completed. 

In June, 1894, Rev. F. X. Labonte was appointed to the 
pastorate of Besancon, where he remained until February 
1902, nearly eight years. During his pastorate he made exten- 



The Churches, Continued. 241 

sive improvements. Besides making repairs on the church 
and instaUing a new heating apparatus, he purchased six addi- 
tional acres of land, on which stood a house, on September 1, 
1897, at a cost of |1,050. On this ground he built a school and 
Sisters' residence, in 1898, at a cost of about |4,000. St 
Joseph's School, this was its name, was opened in the fall of 
1900, with the Sisters of St. Agnes in charge. From February 
to June 1902, the Rev. F. J. Dandurand attended Besancon 
from Monroeville. 

The Rev. John F. Noll was transferred from Kendallville 
to Besancon, in June 1902. There was |6,000 of debt on the 
place when he took charge, which he reduced to |2,500, besides 
paying for improvements costing $3,000. The Church was 
beautifully frescoed in 1904, the school house renovated and 
church property generally improved. Three new altars, which, 
with their furnishings, cost $1,300, were placed in the church 
and solemnly dedicated on May 30, 1906. On July 11, 1906, 
Father Noll was transferred to Hartford City and the Rev. 
Charles Dhe was appointed pastor of St. Louis' Church, at 
Besancon, where he remains at the present time. St. Louis' 
Congregation now has 108 families numbering 544 souls. 

St. Louis' Church has the Confraternity of Christian 
Mothers organized on March 19, 1906, with forty members, 
and the Children of Mary Sodality, with twelve members. 
Two boys of the parish are now preparing for the priesthood. 
The school is attended by forty-eight pupils, taught by two 
Sisters of St. Agnes. The debt on the church property, at 
the present time, is $2,300. 



HESSE CASSEL. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1851. 

In the archives of St. Joseph's Church is found an old 
book, dated September 29, 1841, in which the Catholics of 
that time pledged themselves to pay a certain amount for the 
support of their priest. Rev. Joseph de Mutzig Hamion. Similar 
lists are found in that book up to 1846. The first priest visiting 
the Catholics here wasi hkely. Father Hamion. The first 
settlers were immigrants from Hesse Cassel, diocese of Fulda. 



242 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

The church grounds consist of four acres, secured at four 
different times. These grounds also answer for cemetery pur- 
poses. The first church, a log building, was erected in 1851 
or 1852, and later on a frame addition was made. The present 
church begun in 1860, was finished in 1861, by Rev. Jacob 
Mayer. Its dimensions are 80x42 feet, and will seat 250 
persons. It is a plain structure, without any pronounced style 
of architecture, though the altars, placed in 1892, are Gothic. 

The present school was built by Rev. J. H. Hueser, D.D., 
in 1879, a two-story brick building, 32x20 feet, with accom- 
modations for 100 pupils. The cost of this building, including 
a dwelling for the sisters, was about |3,690. Until 1870, the 
school was in charge of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ; 
since that time two Franciscan Sisters, of Joliet, Illinois, have 
taught the school, attended by sixty-six pupils. The school 
is a free school, all the expenses being paid by the St. Joseph's 
School Society. 

The priest's house is a brick building. It was begun at 
an earlier day, but Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, the first resident 
pastor at Hesse Cassel, completed it, in 1875. It was Father 
Nussbaum also who began to keep the parish records, as they 
should be kept. Four girls of Hesse Cassel have become 
Sisters. 

The following are the priests who have served the Cath- 
olics, at Hesse Cassel. The list is prepared from the church 
records: Rev. Joseph de Mutzig Hamion, as early as 1841; 
Rev. Julian Benoit; Rev. Joseph Rudolph; Rev. Alphonse 
Munschina, 1845; Rev. Edward M. Faller, from 1847 till 1851; 
Rev. B. H. Schultes, from 1851 till 1856; Rev. Joseph Weutz, 
1857. The names of Fathers Schultes, Benoit and Faller 
appear in 1857. Rev. John Force, 1857; Rev. L. Schneider, 
1858; Rev. Jacob Mayer, from 1858 till 1863; Rev. Martin 
Kink, from 1863 to 1866; Rev. Wilham Woeste, from 1866 till 
1872; Rev. John Wemhofi", 1868; Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, from 
1873 till 1877: first resident pastor; Rev. William Geers, 1877; 
Rev. J. H. Hueser, D.D., from 1877 till January 1880; Rev. 
John Mark, from 1880 to 1897; Rev. Maximilian Benzinger, 
since October 17, 1897. 

St. Joseph's has seventy-three families, numbering 386 
souls. St. Joseph's School Society, for married men; St. 



The Churches, Continued. 243 

Mary's Altar Society, for married women; St. Aloysius' Society, 
for single men, and the St. Agnes' Society, for single women, 
have a total membership of two hundred and twenty. The 
Confraternities of the Holy Rosary, of the Holy Family, and 
for the Poor Souls, aggregate one hundred and fifty members. 
The church property is out of debt. 



LOTTAVILLE. 

SS. PETER AND PAUL's CHURCH. 
1851. 

The Catholic settlers at Lottaville, numbering about 
thirteen families, had emigrated from Bavaria, from 1840 to 
1842. It seems that Rev. Francis Fischer, who at the time 
resided in Chicago, celebrated Mass for the first time in Lotta- 
ville (Turkey Creek) in a log house, in the year 1841, and paid 
bimonthly visits until 1846. Rev. A. Carius residing at St. 
John, Lake county, paid Lottaville regular monthly visits up 
to the year 1851, when a frame church was erected on the 
grounds of the present cemetery. At this -time the number 
of families had increased to forty. It appears from the records 
that Revs. C. Schilling, C. S. C, Fuerst, James Joseph Mayer, 
Dresch, Wolfgang N. Giedl, paid Lottaville occasional visits. 

Rev. Philip Wegemeyer was the first resident pastor, and 
was succeeded by Rev. M. P. Wehrle, who built the stone 
church in 1863. Lottaville did not have a resident pastor 
continuously. Rev. Matthew Jacob Schmitz, of Dyer, attended 
it and built the present priest's house. The Rev. Henry 
Meissner was pastor at Lottaville from July 1871 to 1873, and 
was succeeded by Revs. F. J. Freund, in 1874, F. X. Baum- 
gartner, from 1874 to December 1880, H. M. Roth, until the 
spring of 1883, Maurice Kaeder, O. S. B., and /Lmilian Wend- 
dell, O. S. B., in 1884. After these came the Rev. Joseph Flach 
from 1885 till July 29, 1888, and after him Rev. Charles V. 
Stetter, D.D., who erected the present Sisters' dwelling. For 
two years, until November 1905, Lottaville was a mission 
attended from Hobart by Rev. Thomas F. Jansen, during 
which time the School Sisters of Notre Dame came to Lotta- 
ville. On November 6, 1905, the Rev. Frederick Koenig was 
appointed pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's Church at Lotta- 



244 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

ville, which position he holds at the present time. He at once 
erected a suitable school-house, consisting of a basement, two 
school-rooms and a hall. Three School Sisters of Notre Dame 
have charge of the school, with an attendance of sixty-six 
pupils. The congregation has a cemetery of four acres. Besides 
this there are two acres, on which the church, the school-house, 
the priest's house and Sisters' residence have been erected. 

There is a debt of |3,500 on the church property. The 
parish has forty-eight families, numbering 259 souls. The 
Altar Society, for married women, has forty-two members; 
the Sodality, for single women, fifty.-eight members; the same 
for single men, twenty-four members; and the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, thirty-one members. 



PULASKI. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1852. 

This mission comprised Indian Creek township, of Pulaski 
county, and had two distinct settlements, known as Pulaski 
and Indian Creek. The first Catholic settlers were Germans, 
arriving here about the year 1840. They came from northern 
Ohio, at the time of the construction of the canal through 
Logansport. The first baptism for the station Pulaski was 
recorded by the Rev. F. A. Carius on September 10, 1846, and 
the first baptism for Indian Creek by the Rev. E. M. Faller 
on September 2, 1851. These stations were visited by Rev. 
F. A. Carius 1846 till 1847, Rev. Patrick McDermott 1848 till 
1850, Rev. E. M. Faller and Rev. Phihp O' Connell in 1851. 

In the year 1852, the first church, called St. Ann's and 
later St. Francis of Assissi, was erected. It was a frame build- 
ing, 16x24 feet, and had in it one door and two windows. It 
was situated one mile west of the present Pulaski. When in 
1870 a larger frame church was built, this smaller one was 
added to it, and used for a sacristy. The first church in the 
Indian Creek settlement was erected in 1855, and was enlarged 
in 1858. This location was abandoned in the year 1866, when 
a new frame church was built about two miles south of Pulaski. 
At the time these first churches were erected. Father Carius 
had charge of these missions. He was succeeded by Rev. 



The Churches, Coniinued. 245 

William Doyle, in 1855. Bishop Luers, in 1858, sent Rev. 
F. X. Nigh as the first resident pastor to Pulaski, with Indian 
Creek, Winamac, Monterey, etc., as missions. Father Nigh 
resided with a private family. His successor, in 1862, was 
Rev. Martin Kink, who did not reside here. One baptism, by 
Rev. B. Kroeger, is recorded in the fall of 1863. Rev. B. J. 
Force was pastor from 1864 to 1866, during which time Rev. 
Joseph A. Winter also attended these missions. The pastorate 
of Rev. Henry Koenig extended from 1867 till the close of 
1872. He bought one-quarter of an acre of ground, near the 
Indian Creek Church, and on it built the first priest's house, 
a small frame building. Rev. Bernard Wiedau was pastor 
from the close of 1872 till the summer of 1873. 

Bishop Dwenger, in the summer of 1873, gave the Fathers 
of the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood charge of the 
churches at Pulaski and Indian Creek. The first priest sent 
was Rev. Augustine Reichert, C. PP. S., who resided at Wina- 
mac, and from there attended these churches for about three 
months. After him came the following Fathers: Rev. Beatus 
Ziswyler, C. PP. S., from 1873 to 1874; Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, 
C. PP. S., in 1875; Rev. Theobald Schoch, C. PP. S., in 1876; 
Rev. John Frericks, C. PP. S., in 1877; Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, 
C. PP. S., again from 1878 till 1880; Rev. John Frericks, C. 
PP. S., again from 1881 till 1889; Rev. Frederick Baumgartner, 
C. PP. S., in 1890; Rev. Raphael Schmaus, C. PP. S., from 
1891 till 1893; Rev. J. WiUbald Sliemers, C. PP. S., from 1894 
till 1896; Rev. Erhard Fritz, C. PP. S., from 1897 till June 
1901; Rev. Martin L. Dentinger, C. PP. S., from 1901 till 
October 1903; Rev. Julian Meyer, C. PP. S., six weeks, in 1903; 
Rev. Anthony Dick, C. PP. S., from November 24, 1903 till 
September 30, 1905; Rev. Frank X. Schalk, C. PP. S., since 
October 1, 1905. 

When, in the year 1894, Bishop Rademacher visited these 
churches and saw how they were old and decaying and how 
inconveniently they were located, being only a few miles apart, 
he decided it would be best for both, if the two parishes were 
united into one, by building a church in Pulaski. Father 
Sliemers then bought two acres of land, on the east side of the 
Tippecanoe river, just opposite Pulaski, and on this site the 
present priest's house and a chapel were built, in 1895. The 



246 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Sisters of the Precious Blood, prior to 1890, had conducted a 
school at Indian Creek, but in that year abandoned the place 
for a lack of funds and of attendance. Steps however have 
been taken for the erection of a nev^^ school, in the near future. 

The corner stone for the new church was laid, on July 2, 
1899, and the dedication took place on May 20, 1900, Father 
Fritz being the pastor. The building is of brick with stone 
trimmings, measuring 45x90 feet, with a tower 100 feet high, 
and has a seating capacity of 350. The cost of the church, 
including furniture, was about $9,000. The church property 
has a debt of |600. 

St. Joseph's Church has the St. Rose's Young Ladies' 
Sodality and the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, for Married 
Women. The number of souls in the parish is about 500, 
constituting 106 families. One boy and one girl, belonging to 
the same family, have entered religious communities. 



AVILLA. 

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY CHURCH. 
1853. 

In the thirties, of the last century, Mr. Comparet estab- 
lished a trading' post between Kendall ville and Rome City, 
where the settlers and the Indians were accustomed to meet. 
It was here, that Father Badin paid occasional visits to the 
few Catholics, not numbering more than eight families. Father 
Lalumiere's name is still mentioned reverently as another of 
the pioneer missionaries. Rev. Alphonse Munschina visited 
the place, at a later date, attending to the spiritual wants of 
the Catholics in and about Avilla. After him came, at inter- 
vals, the Rev. Louis Mueller, resident at Fort Wayne, from 
1836 until 1840. Father Benoit paid frequent visits to Avilla. 
The visits had to be made on horseback. 

Mass was celebrated at Avilla, either in the log house of 
John Geiser or of Frank Borck. Rev. Joseph Rudolph also 
visited Avilla from Fort Wayne. The eight Catholic families, 
at that time living in or near Avilla, were organized into a 
congregation by Rev. Edward M. Faller, pastor at Fort Wayne, 
in 1853, and placed under the patronage of the Blessed Virgin 



The Churches, Continued. 247 

Mary. The land for the new church was donated by John 
Geiser; it was on the site of the present cemetery. A frame 
building, 25x36 feet, to serve as a church, was erected on the 
land donated and was dedicated by Bishop de St. Palais, in 
1853. 

Avilla received its first resident pastor in 1858, in the 
person of Rev. Henry Schaefer. The sphere of labor, assigned 
to him, extended from Elkhart county to the Ohio State Hne, 
and from Allen county north to the Michigan State boundary. 
Rev. Francis Deipenbrock was appointed to succeed Father 
Schaefer, in 1863. The little church having become entirely 
too small, he built an addition of twenty feet to it. Rev. 
John Wemhoff took charge in December, of the same year, 
and remained until December 1865. The Rev. A. B. Oechter- 
ing had charge until May 12, 1867. 

The Rev. Dominic Duehmig arrived in Avilla on February 
22, 1867, and on May 12th, of the same year, was installed as 
pastor of the Church of the Assumption at Avilla, and con- 
tinued as such until June 3, 1905, the date of his death. Father 
Duehmig found his parish to consist of about forty families, 
and a Httle building 18x24 feet, serving as a school, with an 
attendance of only seventeen children. Father Duehmig at 
once added twelve feet to this building. He secured the 
services of John Everhardy as teacher, who was later suc- 
ceeded by August Vogeding, who was organist of the church 
for twenty-eight years, and then by Edward Spoth, who had 
become a famous composer of church music. In 1872 the Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ taught the school for some time, 
until the Sisters of St. Francis of the Sacred Heart took charge. 

When Thomas Storey, in the early part of 1876, donated 
the congregation six and one-quarter acres of land, located 
about one-quarter of a mile south of where the first church 
stood, the majority of the members of the congregation decided 
to build the new church on this ground. The corner stone of 
the new church was laid, by Father Duehmig, in the fall of 1 876. 
The new church is a beautiful brick building, 44x113 feet in 
size, and owing to careful supervision and management, includ- 
ing the frescoing, the pews and stained glass windows, cost 
only |8,600. Bishop Dwenger dedicated it on May 19, 1878. 
The church is of Roman architecture, with a seating capacity 



248 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of 400. The pulpit and the side altars were placed in 1880, 
the pipe organ in 1885, and the main altar in 1895. 

The new school house was erected in 1878. An addition, 
30x36 feet was built in 1900, thereby enlarging the Sisters' 
dwelling, and providing a little chapel for their use. One 
hundred and fourteen children are on the school roll, taught 
by three Sisters. A commodious priest's house was erected 
south of the church, in 1889, at an outlay of |3,600. In 1895 
Father Duehmig became largely instrumental, in supplying the 
buildings of the Old Peoples' Home, with a more modern 
structure. In the year 1904, Father Duehmig erected a Mor- 
tuary Chapel in the cemetery and named it the Chapel of the 
Immaculate Conception, in commemoration of the Golden 
Jubilee of the definition of that dogma. Father Duehmig did 
not live to see it entirely finished. He departed this life, as 
already stated, on June 3, 1905. 

Four great events have been specially commemorated in 
St. Mary's parish. First, the Silver Jubilee of Pope Pius IX, 
in 1871. Second, the Silver Jubilee of Rev. D. Duehmig, in 
1891. Third, the Fourhundredth Anniversary of the Dis- 
covery of America, in 1892. Fourth, the Pontifical Silver 
Jubilee of Leo XIII. 

The congregation has the following societies: The Rosary 
Society, for married women, seventy-seven members; St. 
Joseph's School Society, for married men, fifty-eight members; 
the Young Men's Sodality, for single men, sixty-six members; 
the Young Ladies' Sodality, for single women, sixty-six mem- 
bers; the Holy Childhood, for children, one hundred and ninety 
members; the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, sixty 
members; the Apostleship of Prayer, three hundred and seventy 
members; the Confraternity of the Scapular of Mount Carmel, 
fifty-six members; and the C. K. of A., forty-two members. 

On July 1, 1905, the Rev. John H. Bathe took charge of 
the parish. Father Bathe cleared up the financial affairs of 
the congregation and on October 3, 1905, having finished the 
Mortuary Chapel, dedicated it. 

Assistant priests at St. Mary's, in the order given, were: 
Rev. M. Zumbuelte, Rev. Louis A. Moench, Rev. Maurice 
Helferich, O. S. B., Rev. Henry Meissner, Rev. George Lauer, 
Rev. John Schmitz, and Rev. William C. Miller. 



The Churches, Continued. 249 

St. Mary's Church has given three of her sons to the priest- 
hood and fifteen of her daughters have entered the religious 
state of Hfe. The parish at Avilla has eighty-six families, 
numbering 509 souls. The debt on the church property is 

$1,050. 



LA PORTE. 

ST. Peter's church. 

1853. 

The Government had a land office located where Laporte 
now is, for the purpose of disposing of the land, in the year 
1833. Settlers had arrived here as early as 1830. The town 
was surveyed in the year 1833. The first railroad to enter 
into Laporte was, what is now known as the Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern, in 1852, and extended to Chicago the 
following year. The Lake Erie railroad was built between 
Laporte and Plymouth in 1856, and in 1871 the branch to 
Michigan City. With the building of the railroads Catholic 
famiUes settled in Laporte. In those days, priests from Notre 
Dame visited the place at regular intervals, and Mass was 
celebrated in private houses. Mass was also celebrated in the 
old university building, better known as the Medical College, 
which was situated on the site of the present "Central School 
Building." Mass was even said in the old Methodist church, 
located on the northeast corner of Jefferson and Monroe streets. 
In the history of Laporte, by Packard, we read; "The exist- 
ence of St. Peter's Church is almost coeval with that of the 
city of Laporte." An old baptismal record, and old records 
prior to 1870 show, that this church was formerly called the 
Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

In 1849, the Holy Cross Fathers visited Laporte, and said 
Mass once a month in a little school-house, at the west end of 
Harrison street. When no opportunity for Mass was given in 
Laporte, people would travel twelve miles over sandy and 
rough roads to Michigan City, to assist at the Holy Sacrifice. 
Many of them would go to Notre Dame to receive the Sacra- 
ments. The Holy Cross Fathers travelled, either in cumber- 
some farm wagons or on horse back to reach Laporte. 



250 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Rev. M. P. Rooney built the first church, 30x40 feet, part 
of which is still standing. It was erected between 1853 and 
1854 and was very primitive. The faithful knelt upon mother 
earth, the altar was constructed of dry goods boxes, con- 
fessions were heard by the priests sitting on the altar steps. 
Later on, Rev. Francis Lawler added wings to the building, 
and to the rear of the church annexed the priest's house. Here 
the priests lived until 1880, when Rev. M. E. Campion built 
the present house, at a cost of |1,793. Rev. John Crawley 
remodeled the church, in 1893, and built a steeple: but he did 
not live to celebrate Mass in the church he had beautified. 

From the year 1840, Rev. F. Cointet, C. S. C, Rev. A. 
Shortis, C. S. C, and Rev. C. SchilHng, C. S. C, visited Laporte 
and vicinity. Father Rooney was the first resident pastor. 
After him came Rev. R. Wallace, C. S. C, and Rev. B. J. Force, 
C. S. C. From 1854 to July 1859, Rev. E. B. Kilroy was pastor. 
Father Kilroy was succeeded by the Rev. Francis Lawler, the 
first secular priest in charge of this parish. Rev. Timothy 
O'SuUivan was pastor here from 1870 until June 1880. He 
also visited the missions Walkerton, Wanatah and Westville. 
During his time the Lake Shore railroad shops were moved 
from Laporte, causing an enormous decrease in the Catholic 
population. Father O'Sullivan was succeeded by the Rev. 
M. E. Campion in June 1880, remaining until May 1883. He 
built the frame pastoral residence. Rev. James A. Twigg 
came next, from the spring of 1883 until the fall of 1884, when 
he was succeeded by Rev. J. B. Crawley. The latter con- 
tracted pneumonia when the remodeled church was dedicated, 
and died on December 19, 1893. Until October 1897 Rev. 
John Grogan was the pastor, when he was compelled to resign 
owing to bad health. The present pastor was appointed on 
October 9, 1897, his name is Rev. George M. Schramm. 

The present church property has 188 feet front on Monroe 
street. The ground was secured by the founder of Notre 
Dame. The seating capacity of St. Peter's Church is 400. 

Brother Daniel, C. S. C. taught school, in 1855, using the 
church for a school- room. In the spring of 1856 school was 
taught in a building, located where now the priest's house 
stands. Later on, the Sisters bought the Walker homestead, 
situated on Ridge street, the ground comprising an entire 



The Churches, Continued. 251 

block, and located at a distance of about five blocks from the 
church. The old school building was moved to this place, and 
here the Sisters opened an academy for girls, though it is the 
parish school also. The school having become too small, it is 
being enlarged, at the present time. These sisters are Sisters 
of the Holy Cross. They reside in the convent, annexed to 
the school, which was formerly the old Walker residence. 
Non-Catholics also send their daughters to this school, which is 
called St. Rose's Academy. 

St. Peter's Aid Society for Men, with a membership of 
fifty-two, was organized in 1901. Its object is to unite the 
men of the parish and afford relief in time of need. The Rosary 
Society, for married Women, was first called the altar society 
organized in 1855, and has a membership of ninety-one. The 
Sodality of the Children of Mary, established in 1882, has 
eighteen members. In 1903, the St. Aloysius Society was 
organized, with a present membership of twenty. The Young 
Ladies' Sodahty of the Immaculate Conception has seventy 
members. The number of families is 162, numbering 654 
souls. The debt on the church property is |1,000. 

Millcreek and Stillwell are stations, attended from Laporte. 
The pioneer pastors of Laporte had the care also of Chesterton, 
Warsaw, Walkerton, Wanatah and Westville, at different times. 

A statement concerning St. Peter's Church at Laporte, 
dated July 26, 1872, made by Rev. Timothy O'Sullivan to 
Bishop Dwenger, presents some interesting items. A few may 
be given: "Value of church property |6,375. Number of 
Full Families, including Walkerton, Fish Lake and Eastward 
on Railroad about 105, of these forty-five families do little or 
nothing for the church; some of them scarcely ever make their 
appearance in church. Families of Widowers or Widows, 
twenty-two, of which eleven pay little or nothing towards the 
support of the church. Parties married to non-Catholics five, 
of which three do nothing for the church. One woman has 
become an infidel. Young women or men working for them- 
selves fifteen, of these six pay nothing or very Httle. Since 
my arrival at Laporte, about twenty-seven families have 
moved away. One or other of the parties is German. We 
have a parochial school and an Academy of the Sisters of Holy 
Cross. Income: Pew rents about $600. Sunday collections 



252 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

|140. My salary here has been |600 a year. Since I received 
charge of Chesterton, I always try to supply my place here 
on Sundays by a priest from Notre Dame." 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1853. 

The history of the Catholic Church in South Bend dates 
back to 1680. In this year, Rev. Claude Allouez, S. J., erected 
a most primitive chapel on the borders of St. Mary's lake, of 
the present Notre Dame. At that time it was principally the 
Pottawottamie Indians, who worshipped here. After the 
death of Father Allouez, which occurred in 1689, came Rev. 
James Gravier, S. J., who in turn was succeeded by Rev. Claude 
Aveneau, S. J., when, in 1759, the fort on St. Joseph's river 
was reduced by English soldiers, and the survivors were taken 
prisoners and were carried away to Quebec. The mission was 
then entirely deserted, until it was reorganized by Rev. Stephen 
Theodore Badin, who built here a log chapel in 1830, 24x40 
feet, which served for church and priest's residence. Father 
Badin labored here until 1832, when Rev. Louis de Seille took 
up the missionary work in these regions, from 1832 to 1837. 
The youthful, newly ordained priest. Rev. Benjamin M. Petit 
was Father de Seille's successor, from 1837 to February 10, 
1839, the date of his death. For three years thereafter, the 
Catholic Indians, and others living in these regions, were 
attended by missionaries from different parts at irregular 
intervals. From November 26, 1842 until the present day, 
however, the Catholics of South Bend have been served faith- 
fully by Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Cross. It 
was on the date mentioned, that Rev. Edward Sorin, C. S. C, 
with six Brothers arrived and founded Notre Dame. 

Until the year 1853 the Catholics of that part of South 
Bend known as Lowell, worshipped in the chapel at Notre 
Dame: but in the year mentioned. Father Sorin erected a brick 
structure, 22x40 feet, on ground which had been secured in 
1847, consisting of three lots located on the south-east corner 
of Hill, street and La Salle avenue. The addition of a kitchen 



The Churches, Continued. 253 

and dining room is still standing. . A second story was added 
on this building in 1882. Divine services were held here by 
priests from Notre Dame, and the school was taught in the 
same building by Sisters of the Holy Cross. This building 
was known first as St. Alexius' School and Chapel, and later as 
the Academy of the Assumption. The priests who attended 
St. Alexius' Chapel from Notre Dame were: Rev. Edward 
Sorin, C. S. C, Rev. Alexius Granger, C. S. C, Rev. Francis 
Cointet, C. S. C, Rev. Richard Shortis, C. S. C, Rev. Thomas 
Flynn, C. S. C, Rev. B. J. Force, C. S. C, Rev. J. Bourget, 
C. S. C, Rev. Z. Leveque, C. S. C, Rev. P. P. Cooney, C. S. C, 
Rev. Thomas Carroll, C. S. C, Rev. W. Corby, C. S. C, Rev. C. 
Exel, C. S. C, Rev. J. C. Carrier, C. S. C, Rev. P. Hartlang, 
C. S. C, Rev. A. Lemonnier, C. S. C, Rev. S. Daugherty, 
C. S. C, Rev. L. J. L'Etourneau, C. S. C, Rev. Julius Frere, 
C. S. C, and Rev. Louis Neyron. It was in the year 1867, that 
Father L'Etourneau began to take up a subscription for the 
new church, and how difficult it was in those days to collect 
money may be surmised from the fact, that in two years and 
four months he collected |748.83. The new church was erected 
on the corner of Hill street and LaSalle avenue, at a cost of 
$1,385.76. It was a frame building, 40x60 feet, and was com- 
pleted in September 1868. A sacristy and one room were 
added to the rear of the church, and on July 1, 1869, Father 
Frere, became the first resident pastor of St. Joseph's Congre- 
gation. A paper, left by Father Frere, contains the census 
of the parish which he took up in 1868 and which records 
forty-seven families, with a total of 210 souls. Even in those 
early days St. Joseph's had flourishing societies: The Ladies 
of Nazareth, since 1860, who had charge of the sanctuary and 
altar, who, since 1890, have become members also of the 
Apostleship of Prayer, of the Living Rosary, of the Confra- 
ternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The Children of 
Mary, since 1862. The St. Joseph's Society for Men since 
1868, the strongest Cathohc organization in South Bend in its 
day, it flourished until 1896. The St. Aloysius' Society for 
Boys, since 1868, known today as the Catholic Knight's Cadets. 
Father Oechtering of Mishawaka was want to say "that any 
priest may organize societies for boys, but that not even the 
grace of God can keep them up." 



254 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

In the fall of 1870, Rev. William Demers, C. S. C, was 
made the second resident pastor of St. Joseph's Church. He 
repaired and improved the church property, in many respects. 
On December 26, 1872, at high noon, the church burned down. 
The origin of the fire was not known at the time, but some 
years later, an unfortunate man on his death bed at Laporte, 
confessed to the deed. The Blessed Sacrament, the sacred 
vessels, the church books and the church vestments were 
saved, and the church was insured for |2,500. "Even the 
famous reed organ was thrown down from the gallery, and out 
of the burning edifice. It survived the fall, but to judge from 
the groans which it now occasionally emits in the present St. 
Joseph's school, it never got over the shock." The congrega- 
tion now returned to the old St. Alexius' Chapel, with Rev. 
Peter Lauth, C. S. C, as their pastor and Father Sorin bought 
the block, on which St. Joseph's Hospital now stands. Here 
he erected a brick building, 32x50 feet, the upper story of 
which was used for a church, and the lower for a boys' school, 
with rooms for pastor and teachers. Father Lauth was pastor 
from January 1873 till September 1874, and was succeeded by 
Father L'Etourneau, who remained until September 1875, 
when Father Lauth returned and was pastor till September 
1876. Rev. William Demers, C. S. C, from September 1876 
to September 1877; Rev. P. F. Veniard, C. S. C, from Sep- 
tember 1877 to July 1, 1880; Rev. Thomas Vagnier, C. S. C, 
from July 1, to August 1880; Rev. Michael Philip Fallize, 
C. S. C, from August 15, 1880 till the fall of 1888. Father 
Fallize was a most energetic pastor. Being himself a musician, 
the choir received his first attention. A new census taken by 
him revealed the necessity for a new church, and it was decided 
to put up a new church, on the site where the church had been 
destroyed by fire, in 1872. The present St. Joseph's Church 
was accordingly built, a brick structure, 51x149 feet, at a cost 
of $18,000. The corner-stone was laid at the close of July 
1881, and the church was dedicated September 10, 1882. 
During the erection of the church. Rev. D. Hagerty was as- 
sistant to Father Fallize. In 1884 a two-story brick building, 
30x60 feet, costing about $4,000, was provided for a boys' 
school and a hall. The school was taught by Brothers of the 
Holy Cross for two years, since which time the Sisters of the 



The Churches, Continued. 255 

Holy Cross have had charge of them. Father FalHze estab- 
Hshed the CathoHc Knights of America, known as St. Paul's 
Branch, in 1885, and also the Total Abstinence Society, he 
being the State President for years. The next pastor was 
Rev. James Gleeson, C. S. C, from the fall of 1888 till August 
1889. After him came Rev. N. J. Stoflfel, C. S. C, who attended 
St. Joseph's from Notre Dame during one year, before he took 
up his residence at St. Joseph's. In the summer of 1891 the 
boys' school and hall building was converted into a pastor's 
residence, at a cost of $1,355. Costly repairs and improve- 
ments were made, including a first-class furnace for the church. 
A children's fair held in 1900 netted |1,860. Alexius Coquil- 
lard, who died in February 1890, bequeathed $5,000 to St. 
Joseph's Church. Father Stoffel departed this life, on March 
20, 1902. 

The next pastor of St. Joseph's Church, and who is the 
pastor at the present time, is the Rev. Peter Lauth, C. S. C, 
who took charge on April 5, 1902. Since his advent all but 
$1,200 of the old debt has been paid, and many repairs and 
necessary improvements, amounting to over $3,300, including 
new roofs on church and house, construction of sewer, paving 
of streets, frescoing of the church have been made. It is the 
intention to build a new parochial residence, in the near future. 

Besides the societies mentioned, St. Joseph's has at present 
the Holy Name Society, with fifty members, and the Holy 
Angels' Sodality, with 100 members. The records show that 
the parish includes about 330 families, with a total of 1,826 
souls. 

St. Joseph's parochial school is attended by 306 children, 
in charge of seven Sisters of the Holy Cross. The church 
property has a debt of $1,200. 



LAFAYETTE. 

ST. BONIFACE' CHURCH. 
1854. 



In 1853, Bishop de St. Palais entrusted Rev. Philip Doyle 
with the organization of the German Parish in Lafayette. 
Two lots were purchased, and a substantial brick building was 



256 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

erected, fronting on Tenth street, in 1854, at a cost of |8,400. 
Rev. Pinkers, succeeding Father Doyle, erected a brick school 
building, fronting on Ferry street. Up to 1863, Rev. Neuber, 
Rev. John Wemhoff and Rev. Joseph Stephan were pastors, 
in the order named. After them came Rev. Francis Deipen- 
brock, during whose pastorate, the present St. Boniface's 
Church, situated on the corner of Ninth and North streets, 
was erected. The church is of Gothic architecture, 155x60 
feet, and without tower and spire cost |28,762. 

In the beginning of 1866, Bishop Luers gave the Fran- 
ciscan Fathers, of the Cincinnati Province, charge of St. Boni- 
face's Church. Rev. Venantius Arnold, O. F. M., was made 
the first pastor, and Rev. William Gausepohl, O. F. M., his 
assistant. During that year the church was furnished with 
stained glass windows, and a magnificent Main Altar. At the 
same time, a two-story school building was erected on the 
foundation of the old church, on Tenth street. Rev. Dionysius 
Abarth, O. F. M., was pastor but on account of ill health had 
to retire, in 1870, when Rev. Accursius Beine, O. F. M., suc- 
ceeding him, furnished the church with a large pipe organ and 
two Gothic Side Altars. In 1871, the lot in the rear of the 
church was purchased for 1 1,600, and the present parsonage 
built on it for $5,000. Rev. Agnellus Fischer, O. F. M., was 
pastor of St. Boniface's Church, from 1878 to 1882, when he 
returned to Europe. 

During the pastorate of Rev. Daniel Heile, O. F. M., in 
1883, a two-story brick building, adjoining the church on 
Ninth street, was erected, which has since then served as a 
boys' school. It was completed and furnished at a cost of 
$7,300. A dwelling for the teachers. Sisters of the Third Order 
Regular of St. Francis, was built in 1885, at the corner of 
Tenth and Ferry streets, costing |2,500. In the summer of 
1887, the tower and spire of the church were completed for 
$2,000. Rev. Pius Niehaus, O. F. M., who had been the 
assistant at St. Boniface's Church since August 1886, was made 
its pastor in 1887. He made various improvements on the 
church property. Rev. Ubaldus Webersinke, O. F. M., became 
pastor in 1891. Under him the interior of the church was 
beautifully ornamented at a cost of $3,000. With becoming 
solemnity, the people of St. Boniface's Church celebrated the 



The Churches, Continued. 257 

Silver Jubilee of the dedication of the present church, on 
Sunday December 28, 1890. 

From 1892 until August 1897, Rev. Hilary Hoelscher, 
O. F. M., was the pastor. He gave the church fme stained 
glass windows, two exquisite statues of the Immaculate Con- 
ception and St. Joseph for the side altars, two confessionals of 
carved oak, and a new communion railing richly gilt and with 
a marble top. During the pastorate of Rev. Lucas Gottbe- 
hoede, O. F. M., the cemetery, known as St. Boniface Ceme- 
tery, consisting of twenty-three acres of land and located 
opposite Springvale cemetery, was secured and solemnly blessed 
on September 17, 1898, by Bishop Rademacher. The St. 
Joseph's Cemetery, consisting of five acres on the north-west 
corner of Greenbush and Seventeenth streets, had been used 
for the burial of the dead since 1862, and had become inade- 
quate. 

A red letter day in the history of St. Boniface's Church 
will ever remain, Sunday September 24, of the year 1899, 
when the Most Rev. Archbishop Martinelli, Apostolic Delegate 
for the United States, in the presence of a vast congregation 
and a large number of clergy, solemnly consecrated St. Boni- 
face's Church to the service of Almighty God. Extensive 
improvements had been made for the occasion, such as a new 
floor of quartered oak, new pews of the same material, the 
three fme Gothic altars redecorated in white and gold, together 
with their statuary, the pulpit better located and redecorated, 
chandeliers and gas fixtures remodeled, in fact the interior of 
the entire church was made to appear as new. Somewhat 
later the walls of the church were tuck-pointed, giving the 
church the appearance of being newly built of pressed brick. 
The Rev. Francis de Paul Lotz, O. F. M., became pastor in 
September 1900. His pastorate was distinguished by various 
improvements of the church property, notably the lighting of 
the church by electricity, and the artistic stone crucifixion 
group in the cemetery. The present pastor. Rev. Leonard 
Nurre, O. F. M., took charge in September 1903. A notable 
event of his pastorate was the solemn celebration of 
the Golden Jubilee of the foundation of the parish, on 
October 23, 1904. Bishop Alerding celebrated the Pontifical 
Mass, assisted by all the former pastors still living, and 



258 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

by a number of other Franciscan Fathers; the Very Rev. 
Provincial Chrysostom Theobald preached the sermon. Father 
Leonard has been especially active in making his parish schools 
the very best. The eight grades are taught in it: the larger 
boys by an efficient lay teacher, the other classes by six Fran- 
ciscan Sisters. The number of pupils is 238. 

The following were the assistants at St. Boniface's Church: 
Rev. WilHam Gausepohl, O. F. M., from January 1866 to April 
1867; Rev. Accursius Beine, O. F. M., from 1867 to 1870; Rev. 
Gregory Fangmann, O. F. M., from September 1870 till August 
1872; Rev. Stephan Sailer, O. F. M., from August 1872 to 
August 1873; Rev. Eberhard Huelsmann, O. F. M., from 
August 1873 till August 1874; Rev. Maximilian Schaefer, O. 
F. M., from August 1874 to September 1875; Rev. Nicholas 
Holtel, O. F. M., from March 1876 to April 1877; Rev. Marcus 
Kreke, O. F. M., from September 1876 to April 1877; Rev. 
Leonard Nurre, O. F. M., from April 1877 to August 1879; 
Rev. Athanasius Lingemann, O. F. M., from August 1879 to 
June 1881; Rev. Philibert Altstaetter, O. F. M., from June 
1881 to August 1884; Rev. Bonaventure Hammer, O. F. M., 
in Lafayette, since April 1882; Rev. Philip Rothmann, O. F. 
M., from August 1884 to August 1886; Rev. Pius Niehaus, 
O. F. M., from August 1886 to 1887; Rev. Henry Berberich, 
O. F. M., from December 1887 to August 1890; Rev. Ignatius 
Wilkens, O. F. M., from August 1888 till September 1890; Rev. 
Ignatius Wilkens, O. F. M., from 1891 to December 1892; Rev. 
John Capistran Heitmann, O. F. M., from September 1890 to 
August 1891; Rev. Otto Ziegler, O. F. M., from January 1893 
to August 1894; Rev. Guido Stallo, O. F. M. from August 
1893 to September 1894; Rev. Matthias Sasse, O. F. M., from 
January 1895 to November 1896; Rev. Gaudentius Schuster, 
O. F. M., from October 1896 to August 1897; Rev. Clementine 
Broermann, O. F. M., from August 1897 to November 1898; 
Rev. Samuel Gelting, O. F. M., from November 1898 to May 
1901; Rev. Bede Oldegeering, O. F. M., from May 1901 to 
November 1902; Rev. Leander Schell, O. F. M., October 1902; 
Rev. Justine Welk, O. F. M. 

Six boys of St. Boniface's parish have become priests and 
twenty girls have become sisters. St. Boniface's Church has: 
The Third Order of St. Francis; Apostleship of Prayer and 



The Churches, Continued. 259 

League of the Sacred Heart; the Young Mens' and the Young 
Ladies' Sodalities of the Blessed Virgin Mary; St. Boniface 
Mens' Society, ninety-five members; St. Mary's Ladies' Society, 
three hundred and seventeen members; Sacred Heart Young 
Ladies' Society, one hundred and thirty-seven members; St. 
Joseph's Benevolent Society, one hundred and eight members; 
Knights of St. Paul, one hundred and twenty-two members; 
Catholic Order of Foresters, three hundred and twenty-five 
members. 

The St. Boniface's Church property has no debt on it. The 
St. Boniface's Cemetery, twenty-three acres, has a debt of 
$2,950. The parish has 368 families, numbering 1,936 souls, 

MONTEREY. 

ST. Ann's church. 

1855. 

In the memory of the oldest living members of St. Ann's 
Church, Rev. Francis Anthony Carius was the first priest to 
visit Monterey, from Logansport, every three months and 
celebrating Mass in the houses of Martin Keller, and others, 
from the year 1852 to 1855. In the latter year. Rev. F. X. 
Nigh, residing at Winamac, built a little frame church, about 
two and one-half miles north-west of Monterey, on the banks 
of the Tippecanoe river. Four acres of ground had been 
secured here, November 26, 1851. Father Nigh continued to 
visit Monterey (Buena Vista) for a few years after which from 
1863 until 1867, it became a mission attended by the pastors 
of Plymouth: Rev. Gabriel Volkert and Rev. George Steiner. 
From 1867 till 1872, St. Ann's was visited by Rev. Henry 
Koenig and Rev. B. Wiedau, from Winamac, after which Rev. 
George Zurwellen visited it, from Plymouth, and from January 
1873 till September Father Wiedau. From 1873 till 1888, ten 
different Fathers, C. PP. S., had the care of Monterey: Rev. 
Beatus Ziswyler, 1873 to 1875, who organized the Married 
Ladies' Altar Society, the St. Mary's Young Ladies' Society 
and the St. Aloysius Young Men's Society. Then came the 
Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, C. PP. S., Rev. Theobald Schoch, 
C. PP. S., Rev. John Frericks, C. PP. S., Rev. Rudolph Abbre- 
deris, C. PP. S., Rev. Conrad Schneider, C. PP. S., and Rev. 



260 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Christian Nigsh, C. PP. S. Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., 
who came in September 1880, was the first resident pastor 
and remained for five years. He bought the present church 
lots in Monterey, in the fall of 1882. The corner-stone of the 
new brick church, in Monterey, was laid in the summer of 

1883, on which occasion Rev. Henry Meissner preached the 
sermon. Bishop Dwenger dedicated the new church in May, 

1884. The cost of this church, including the most necessary 
furniture, was |6,746.25. In January, 1886, Father Fleisch 
was succeeded by Rev. Erhard Fritz, C. PP. S., the last Father, 
C. PP. S., in charge of Monterey. 

The Rev. Charles Thiele, newly ordained, was the pastor 
of St. Ann's Church, from July 1888 till August 1898. The 
priest's house of brick was built in 1889, and with the furniture 
cost |1,865. In 1891, the church was frescoed for |439. In 
1895, a new brick school, hall and Sisters' dwelling combined 
was erected on lots, opposite the church, donated by P. A. 
Follmar. The building cost |2,700, and Bishop Rademacher 
dedicated the same in the fall of the same year. Sisters of 
St. Agnes of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, were installed as teachers. 
The average daily attendance at school is seventy-five pupils. 
When in August, 1898, Father Thiele was removed, the debt 
on the church property was $2,275. Rev. Gregory A. Zern 
was the next pastor, for two years, and during his time three 
acres of ground were bought for $300, one-fourth of a mile 
west of town, for cemetery purposes. The first interment was 
that of August Fox, on May 1, 1899, from whom the ground 
had been bought. Father Zern made some necessary repairs 
and improvements on the church and house, and, when in 
October, 1899, he was removed, he left a debt of $2,863.20 
after him. 

The Rev. F. Joseph Bilstein, the present pastor, officiated 
for the first time, in St. Ann's Church, on Rosary Sunday, 
October 7, 1899. Under his administration the entire debt 
was wiped out. St. Ann's has the Married Ladies' Rosary 
Society, with fifty-five members; the St. Mary Young Ladies' 
SodaHty, with forty-three members; the St. Joseph Young 
Men's Society, with twenty-three members; the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, with twenty-eight members. The number of 
souls is 412, constituting sixty-eight families. 



The Churches, Continued. 261 

ST. VINCENT, ALLEN COUNTY. 

ST. Vincent's church. 

1856. 

The first settlers of what was then known as New 
France, were emigrants from the eastern part of France, 
and the parish of today is made up almost exclusively 
of the descendants of these early settlers. When the 
early days of church life in this settlement are spoken 
of the names of the missionaries frequently mentioned, 
are Fathers Deschamp, Botti, and Grevin. As a mission, 
St. Vincent was attended from the Cathedral at Fort 
Wayne, especially by Father Benoit. Alexander Pichon 
donated the church grounds, about two acres of land. The 
first church was a log structure, and stood in the middle of 
of what is now St. Vincent's Cemeterv. It is not known when 
this first church was built, nor by whom. The second church 
was a frame structure erected by the Rev. August Adam, in 
the year 1861, at a cost of |1,476, the congregation furnishing 
the lumber and the greater part of the labor. The church was 
dedicated on All Saints' day. Father Adam also built the 
pastoral residence still in use, in the year 1868. The third and 
present church was erected in 1904, during the pastorate of 
Rev. M. P. Louen. It is a brick structure, after the Roman 
style of architecture and, inclusive of furniture, cost approxi- 
mately |12,000. The seating capacity is 350, exclusive of 
gallery. The present indebtedness of the parish is $1,100. 

The Sacred Heart Academy building was put up, in the 
year 1866, by and is under the direction of, the Sisters of the 
Holy Cross. A small brick building, adjoining the Academy, 
is used for a parish school, attended by thirty pupils. 

We gather from the baptismal records, that the pastors of 
St. Vincent's Church were the following: Rev. Francis Des- 
champ, 1856 till 1858; Rev. Alexius Botti, 1858 till 1860; 
Rev. Grevin, 1860 till 1861; Rev. August Adam, 1861 till 1870; 
Rev. JuHus Frere, C. S. C, 1870 till 1873; Rev. W. Demers, 
C. S. C, 1873; Rev. Constantine Maujay, 1873 till 1875; Rev. 
C. Wardy, 1875 till 1878; Rev. Bonnet Roche, C. S. C, 1878 
till 1888; Rev. P. J. Franciscus, C. S. C, 1888; Rev. John 
Lauth, C. S. C, 1888 till 1890; Rev. J. M. Toohey, C. S. C, 



262 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1890 till 1895; Rev. Jacob Lauth, C. S. C, 1895; Rev. E. Amaud, 
C. S. C, 1895 till 1897; Rev. A. E. Lafontaine, 1897 till 1901; 
Rev. M. P. Louen, 1901 till January 1, 1907; Rev. Ambrose 
Dowd, C. PP. S., since Jan. 1, 1907. 

The missions St. Leo and Pier Settlement are attended 
from St. Vincent's; the former on the third Sunday of the 
month, the latter four times a year. These churches are St. 
Leo's and St. Michael's. 



UNION CITY. 

ST. mary's church. 

1856. 

As far back as 1852, it is of record that Rev. John Quinlan, 
afterwards Bishop of Mobile, Alabama, visited the Catholic 
families of Union City and vicinity. He administered to their 
spiritual wants until 1854, and was succeeded by the Rev. 
Sheon, the resident pastor at Sidney, Ohio. In 1855, we find 
the name of Rev. J. B. Hemsteger of Piqua, Ohio, attending 
Union City, as a station. 

As a mission Union City was visited from Piqua, Sidney 
and Greenville, Ohio, for a number of years. The first church 
was a chapel, erected on the farm of Joseph Wise, about two 
miles east of town, under the supervision of Rev. McClare, in 
the year 1856. Father Hemsteger again had charge from 
1857 to 1860. He was succeeded by Rev. Thripe of Piqua, 
Ohio, and soon after, by Rev. Shelhammer of Greenville, Ohio. 
The number of Catholics was rapidly increasing, and in 1865 
a brick church, with a seating capacity of 250, was erected on 
Plum street. At the present time this building is used as a 
hall and chapel. Rev. John McMahon was in charge of St. 
Mary's Parish, from 1862 till 1867. When the diocese of Fort 
Wayne was established, in 1857, every doubt was removed as 
to whether St. Mary's Church was in the archdiocese of Cin- 
cinnati or, what was up to that time, the diocese of Vincennes. 
From 1857 St. Mary's Parish has been attended by priests of 
the Fort Wayne diocese. 

Rev. Lawrence Lamoor was the pastor from 1867 till 
1870. After him Rev. Frederick Von Schwedler had charge, 
and was succeeded by Rev. Martin Noll, who attended to 



The Churches, Continued. 263 

Union City from 1872 till 1875. During the pastorate of Rev. 
Jeremiah Quinlan, which extended from 1875 till 1890, funds 
were being collected for the erection of a new church, as the 
old church was too small to accommodate the congregation. 
The number of souls at this time had increased to 650. Father 
Quinlan's successor was the Rev. Francis A. King, who was 
the pastor from 1890 till 1899. It was under his pastorate, 
that the present church, on the corner of Plum and Hickory 
streets, with a seating capacity of 600, was begun and com- 
pleted before the close of 1892, at a cost of |25.000. The Rev. 
Michael Byrne was the pastor at Union City, from 1899 till 
the spring of 1901, since which time the present pastor, the 
Rev. John Durham, has had charge of the congregation. The 
church property, situated in the center of the city, consists of 
four lots or a half block, on which are the beautiful brick church, 
the school-house, a hall and chapel, the priest's and the Sisters' 
residences. A commodious new school-house and Sisters' 
house is being erected at the present time. 

The parish has a Rosary Society of one hundred and forty- 
three members; a Young Ladies' Sodality of sixty-five mem- 
bers; a Columbian Literary Club of eighty members; the Holy 
Angels' Sodality of ninety members; the Knights of Columbus 
of one hundred members and also the Catholic Benevolent 
Legion. 

The Sisters of the Holy Cross conduct the school, which 
is attended by eighty-one pupils. The parish has 126 families, 
numbering 580 souls. When the erection of the nev/ school 
was begun in 1907, St. Mary's church was out of debt, and had 
about i5500 in the treasury, not counting a liberal subscription. 

The mission, St. Joseph's Church, at Winchester, is at- 
tended from Union City. 



KEWANNA, P. O., FULTON COUNTY. 

ST. Ann's church. 

1857. 

These parts were visited as early as 1855, as a station, by 
priests who, for the most part, were located at Logansport, 
The names of priests given in this connection are: Rev. 
Francis Anthony Carius, about 1855; Rev. William Doyle, 



264 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Logansport, from 1855 to 1857; Rev. Charles T. Zucker, Logans- 
port, from 1857 to 1859; Rev. George A. Hamilton, Logans- 
port, from 1859 to 1864; Rev. Bernard Kroeger, Logansport, 
assistant to Father Hamilton; Rev. Bernard Joseph Force, 
Logansport, from 1864 to 1868; Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, 
assistant at Logansport, from 1866 to 1868; Rev. Matthew E. 
Campion, Logansport, from April 1868 to January 1869. They 
came on horseback, over roads well nigh impassable, once a 
month and celebrated Mass in private houses. The families 
were few and scattered. In 1857 or 1858 Rev. F. X. Nigh, of 
Pulaski, induced the people to build a church. It was a plain, 
little frame building and the number of families, at this time, 
was about fifteen. The ground, on which this first church 
stood, contains about three acres, and where the present church 
stands is about two acres. The first mentioned three acres 
are used for cemetery purposes, and the new ground was 
bought by Rev. D. J. Mulcahy, in 1887. The present church 
was built in that same year, and is a plain, frame structure 
and cost probably $3,000. It seats about 300. 

The first priest's house was built by Rev. John Dempsey, 
containing three rooms, and was added to from time to time; 
and, after doing service for thirty years, was sold by Rev. 
M.J. Ford for $100. In 1902, Father Ford erected the present 
pastoral residence, which, including furnishings, cost about 
|3,000. There is no debt on the church property. The number 
of souls is 300, constituting thirty-seven families. One girl of 
the parish has entered the convent. 

What is now known as Kewanna and Lucerne, was, in 
the early days, Fulton and Harrison, and then Grass Creek 
and Harrison. The succession of pastors, from 1868 to the 
present time, is the following: Rev. Charles J. Mougin, Har- 
rison, from April 13, 1868 till 1870; Rev. James O'Brien, Har- 
rison, from 1870 till fall of 1871; from October 29, 1871 till 
August 2, 1873, a vacancy; Rev. John Dempsey, Fulton, from 
August 2, 1873 till January 1877; from January 1877 till the 
spring of 1878, a vacancy; Rev. Thomas M. Cahill, Fulton, 
from the spring of 1878 a few months; Rev. P. J. Crosson, 
Fulton, from November, 1878 till the summer of 1880; Rev. 
M. Joy, Fulton, from the summer of 1880 till the summer of 
1884; Rev. M. F. Kelly, Fulton, from the summer of 1884 



The Churches, Continued. 265 

till the fall of 1886; Rev. D. J. Mulcahy, Fulton, from the fall 
of 1886 till the spring of 1891; Rev. Rudolph Denk, Fulton, 
from spring till fall of 1891; Rev. F. C. Wiechmann, Fulton, 
from October 1891 till the fall of 1892; from the fall of 
1892 till July 1893, a vacancy; Rev. F. W. Schaeper, C. PP. S., 
Fulton, from July 1893 till the fall of 1893; Rev. G. M. Kelly, 
Fulton, from the fall of 1893 till August 1894; Rev. John Cook, 
Fulton, from August 1894 till the spring of 1896; Rev. D. J. 
Hagerty, C. S. C, Fulton, from spring to September 1896; 
Rev. G. A. Zern, Fulton, from September 1896 till the summer 
of 1898; Rev. E. J. Boccard, Fulton, from the summer of 1898 
till the fall of 1900; Rev. John Blum, Fulton, from November 
1900 till June 1901; from the summer of 1901 till May 1902, a 
vacancy; Rev. M. J. Ford, Fulton, from May 1902 till Sep- 
tember 1904; Rev. Edward J. Houlihan, Fulton (Kewanna), 
since October 20, 1904. 

The Rosary Society is for all the members of St. Ann's 
parish, and the Holy Name Society, for children has twenty 
members. 



CHAPTER X. 

THE CHURCHES, CONTINUED, FROM 1858 TILL 1867. 



CHESTERTON — VALPARAISO — HANOVER CENTRE — CRAWFORDS- 
VILLE — LAPORTE, ST. JOSEPH'S — NEW HAVEN — SHELDON — 
SOUTH BEND, ST. PATRICK'S — ANDERSON — COLUMBIA CITY — ■ 
DELPHI — GOSHEN — KLAASVILLE — KOKOMO — HOLY 
TRINITY — ATTICA — OXFORD PLYMOUTH — EGE — KENT- 
LAND — WABASH — FORT WAYNE, ST. PAUL's — COVINGTON — 
LEBANON — ARCOLA — REYNOLDS — DYER — KENDALLVILLE — 
WINAMAC. 



CHESTERTON. 

ST. Patrick's church. 

1858. 

It was in 1824, Joseph Bailey, a Frenchman, brought his 
family to northern Indiana and settled about a mile west of 
the present Chesterton, at a point known to this day as Bailey- 
town. It is said he came in fulfillment of a vow for deliverance 
from extreme peril. From 1824 to 1841, Bailey's house was 
the home of the Catholic Church in Porter county. The present 
Chesterton was in the beginning known as Coflfee-creek ; it was 
an Irish settlement, and a station on the Lake Shore railroad, 
in 1851. In 1855 its name was changed to Calumet. Up to 
1858, Fathers of the Holy Cross, from Notre Dame, attended 
to the spiritual needs of Catholics in these regions. 

In 1858, Rev. E. B. Kilroy built a small frame church, 
and thereafter Calumet was visited every month, from Laporte. 
After Father Kilroy came Rev. Paul Gillen, C. S. C, and then 
Rev. Francis Lawler. In 1869, the place received its present 
name, Chesterton. In 1868, in the month of September, Rev. 
John Flynn was appointed the first resident pastor of Ches- 
terton. He also attended Walkerton every other Sunday. 
Father Flynn died on August 1, 1870, aged twenty-eight years; 
his remains were interred in the parish cemetery of Chesterton. 
From 1870 to 1875 Chesterton was again a mission, visited by 



The Churches, Continued. 267 

several priests, as may be ascertained from the baptismal 
records. The following names are found there: The Rev. 
William F. M. O'Rourke, Rev. F. M. Lawler, Rev. Timothy 
O'SulUvan, Rev. Michael O'Reilly, Rev. P. Koncz, and Rev. 
C. Wardy. From March, 1875, Chesterton has had resident 
pastors up to the present time. Rev. John F. Lang was the 
pastor from March 1875 to March 1878. In August 1879, 
the Rev. H. F. Joseph KroU took charge of St. Patrick's Church. 

In mission days, James Moroney's house was the home of 
visiting priests. The first church built, in 1858, was located 
quite a distance from Chesterton and too inconvenient for the 
attendance of the faithful. For this reason two lots were 
bought during Father Flynn's time. A portion of the present 
St. Patrick's Church was erected in 1874, Father O'Reilly, of 
Valparaiso superintending the work. When Father KroU took 
charge, the church was a building devoid of every ornamenta- 
tion or even the necessary furniture. He had the church 
frescoed, bought three beautiful altars and new pews, and 
built the tower, paying off all indebtedness. The spire alone 
cost |650. The Rev. Herman Juraschek, in 1902, enlarged 
the church by the addition of a transept and a spacious sanc- 
tuary, costing |5,635. New stained glass windows were pro- 
vided at a cost of $425. Two furnaces were also put in. To 
provide the interior of the addition with necessary furniture, 
and to supply the sanctuary with what is required as well as 
the sacristy, and to build cement sidewalks and otherwise 
improving the church grounds necessitated an additional 
outlay of some $1,700. The seating capacity of the church is 
five hundred. 

The parish school had its beginning in 1887, when Father 
Kroll opened two class-rooms in the rear of the church, which 
arrangement continued until 1902. When Rev. F. Von 
Schwedler became the pastor of Chesterton, he had at his dis- 
posal $2,886.83, being principal and interest of a bequest made 
by Mrs. Rosa Howe to Father Kroll. This money was used 
in the erection of the present substantial St. Patrick's school, 
60x45 feet. A memorial slab, bearing the donor's name, is 
found at the entrance. The lot, on which this school was 
built, was bought for $1,500, which money was given to the 
church, for funded masses. Having expended the bequest, a 



268 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

balance of $1,715 remained due after the building had been 
erected. In 1904, an additional half lot was bought, cement 
walks were built, and further supplies for the school had to be 
purchased. The building has a fine basement used as a club 
room for the young men; the main floor has three school-rooms 
with a large hall on the second floor, and a special room for 
society meetings and library. The parochial school teaches 
the eight grades, is conducted by three School Sisters of Notre 
Dame and is attended by seventy-seven pupils. Their support 
is given them from the church revenue. Some twenty non- 
Catholic children attend the school. The Sisters' residence is 
one of the landmarks of the town. In 1907 a new and modern 
residence is being erected for the Sisters at an expense of $2,100. 

The first priest's house was also one of the landmarks, a 
very small building, consisting of one room and a kitchen. 
The first resident pastors lived in this house, as did also Father 
Kroll from 1879 to 1882. The present house was built in 
1882 by Father Kroll at a cost of |2,400. Three hundred 
dollars have been spent on it since. The furniture of the house 
was for the most part donated. The debt on the church prop- 
erty is $3,000. There are ninety-three families, numbering 
498 souls. One boy is preparing for the priesthood and three 
girls have become Sisters. 

The Married Ladies' Rosary and Altar Societies were 
organized in 1899, with sixty-two members, and in the same 
year the Young Ladies' Sodality, with forty-two members. 
The Married Men's Rosary Society was established in 1906, 
with thirty-five members. The Catholic Columbian League of 
Indiana began to exist in 1905, with thirty-six members. 
Aside from their spiritual purposes, these organizations assist 
the pastor in a financial way. 



VALPARAISO. 
ST. p.\ul's church. 

1858. 

It was about 1845 when missionaries began to visit Val- 
paraiso, the name of one of these was Rev. F. Cointet, C. S. C. 
Priests from Notre Dame, namely, Rev. J. Curley, Rev. E. B. 
Kilroy and Rev. E. Leveque visited the place, from 1853 till 



The Churches, Continued. 269 

1857. They celebrated Mass in the old Court House on Wash- 
ington street, and in a grove north-west of the citv. The 
number of families at that time was twentv, mostly Irish, but 
a few French. 

Valparaiso became a mission in 1858, at which time the 
first church, a frame structure, 110x50 feet, costing 82,000 was 
erected during the pastoral attendance of Rev. Paul Gillen. 
The same was made the first resident pastor, residing in a small 
cottage south of the church. The church stood on the corner 
of Indiana avenue and West Chicago street. The construction 
of the Pennsylvania railroad brought many more Irish families, 
and that of the Grand Trunk road increased the number of 
the French families, making a total of about 200 families, or 
900 souls. The resident pastors were: Rev. Paul Gillen, 
C. S. C, from 1857 till June 1858; Rev. John H. Force, from 
July 4, 1858 till December 27, of the same year; Rev. G. A. 
Hamilton, from January 1st, till August 7, 1859; Rev. J 
Alexius Botti, from August 1859 till September 19, 1862; after 
a vacancy of a few months came Rev. Michael O' Reilly, from 
January 17, 1863 till August 4, 1887, the date of his death. 
Rev. John Dempsey, from August 25, 1887 till May 1898. Rev. 
John H. Bathe, a short time. Rev. L. A. Moench, from July 
1898 till February 1903. Rev. William S. Hogan since Feb- 
ruary 26, 1903. Four lots, 60x132 feet, facing West Chicago 
street, between Academy and Campbell streets, and two lots 
of the same dimensions on the corner of Campbell and West 
Chicago streets, were bought by Father O'Reilly, in 1866, for 
|1,800. The present priest's house, a two-story brick, was 
erected in 1870, at a cost of |6,000. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid by Bishop 
Dwenger, on October 8, 1883 and w^as dedicated on July 4, 
1886. The architecture of it is Gothic; the nave has a width 
of fifty feet, the transept eighty-five feet, and the length 165 
feet. The seating capacity is 1000. The furniture is all oak, 
and the total cost was §65,000. 

The school -house on the corner of Academy and West 
Chicago streets was erected in 1867. It is a two-story brick 
building, 90x50 feet, has four large school-rooms, can accom- 
modate 250 pupils and cost §9,000. It was provided with a 
new roof and new floors at a cost of §350, in 1906. The school 



270 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

is conducted by three Sisters of the Holy Cross, with an attend- 
ance of 115 pupils. The Sisters reside in a house on Academy 
street, which was on the lot when bought. Father Hogan 
spent ?2,000 on it, in 1906, for various repairs and improve- 
ments. The pastoral residence, erected in 1870, was improved 
by Father Moench, in 1900, at a cost of §1,000. The debt on 
the church property is $12,500. 

The congregation has 140 families or 800 souls. Quite a 
number of these are students of the Normal School located 
here. The Rosary Society has seventy members, the Young 
Ladies' Sodality, forty; the Sacred Heart Society, thirty; the 
Knights of Columbus, ninety-eight, and the Boys' Sodality, 
forty. St. Paul's has given the church seven priests and 
twenty-five Sisters. 



HANOVER CENTRE. 

ST. martin's church. 

1859. 

As early as 1831, the settlement in the center of Hanover 
township was called Hanover Centre. In the beginning of 
1843, a number of Catholic families purchased small farms, in 
this locality, attending divine service at St. John, Lake 
county. Four and one-half acres were donated by Matthias 
Geisen, and a subscription was taken up to raise funds 
to erect a church, in 1858, but the building was not 
completed until 1859. It was a small frame building, 
about 20x30 feet, to which a sacristy was added, for 
the accommodation of the visiting priest. It was called 
St. Matthias' Congregation. The Rev. F. X. Nigh organ- 
ized the parish and visited it twice a month, attending 
also to Turkey Creek, Crown Point and Klaasville. Father 
Nigh was succeeded by the Rev. M. P. Wehrle, residing at 
Crown Point, and he in turn was succeeded by the Rev. Henry 
Renson. In 1866, Rev. Simon Bartosz planned a new priest's 
house, but, on account of some disagreement as to its locality, 
it was not built until 1867. It was a two-story frame structure, 
22x30 feet. In the year 1866, the church, together with all 
that it contained, was destroyed by fire. The parishoners, 
however, were not to be discouraged. With renewed zeal 



The Churches, Continued. 271 

steps were taken to rebuild; and in 1868 a frame building, 
36x66 feet, at a cost of about $3,000, was completed and called 
St. Martin's Church. 

In 1869, the Rev. Frank Siegelack was appointed the first 
resident pastor, of Hanover Centre, having Klaasville and 
Lowell as missions. Rev. F. X. Deimel succeeded Father 
Siegelack, in 1873, remaining till 1877, when he was transferred 
to the pastorate of Schererville. Father Deimel built a kitchen 
to the pastoral residence, in 1875, having the dimensions of 
20x30 feet. In August 1877, Rev. William Berg was made its 
pastor, having only Hanover Centre to attend to. He pur- 
chased the old public school building, using the same for a 
summer school, for the Catholic children. This building is 
now the Sister's residence. Father Berg remained till June 9, 
1881, when he was succeeded by Rev. Charles Steurer. At 
this time, the congregation numbered about sixty families. 
For six months the parish was left without a priest, and not 
until October 1889 did they receive a pastor. On that date, 
the Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, the present pastor, received his 
appointment. During the night of July 9, 1902, the frame 
priest's house was struck by lightning, caught fire, and, together 
with its contents, was destroyed. The people, at once, set to 
work to provide a new residence, and in November, of the 
same year. Father Zumbuelte occupied the new building. The 
residence is equipped with modern conveniences, and cost 
about S3, 000. 

The number of children being insufficient to continue the 
public school, the building was offered for sale to Father 
Zumbuelte. In September, of 1904, Father Zumbuelte pur- 
chased the building together with its furnishings. Not being 
able to procure Sisters to take charge of his school, he engaged 
a voung Catholic woman. .\ new railroad was surveyed 
through the town, to pass through the building. The com- 
pany agreed to move the building near the church, to build a 
new cistern and well at a cost of $750. The school-house is 
40x60 feet, and valued at 82,500. In September 1905, two 
Sisters of St. Francis, of Lafayette, took charge of the school. 
They have eighty-one children in their care, and teach the 
eight grades. 

St. Martin's Church has the following societies: The 



272 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Young Mens' Sodality, the Young Ladies' Sodality, the Rosary 
Society, St. Martin's Society and the Catholic Order of For- 
esters, with a total of 156 members. 

In his last will, Hilary Roettgen bequeathed to St. Martin's 
Church the sum of |2,000, to be used for the erection of a new 
stone church. The congregation has sixty-two families, num- 
bering 310 souls. The property consists of five and one-half 
acres. There is no debt on the church property. 



CRAWFORDSVILLE. 

ST. Bernard's church. 
1859. 

With the building of the Monon railroad. Catholics began 
to locate in Crawfordsville. The Rev. Michael J. Clark, of 
Lafayette, was the first priest to visit here, celebrating Mass in 
the Court House, about the year 1850. The first church was 
built on the north side of the town, about 1859. It was a 
frame structure, 75x40 feet, costing about |800. The present 
church property, at the corner of Washington and Pike streets, 
has a frontage of 110 feet on Washington street and runs back 
half a block on Pike street. The school property consists of 
one full lot on the corner of Main street and Grant avenue. 
The present church property was purchased by Rev. E. P. 
Walters who had charge from 1868 till 1878. Prior to that 
time. Rev. Edward O' Flaherty was the first resident pastor, 
from 1856 to 1864. He was succeeded by Rev. Charles Mougin, 
from 1864 to 1868. Father Walters erected the present church, 
from 1874 till 1876. It is built in the Gothic style of archi- 
tecture, has a seating accommodation for about 400 persons, 
and cost about |20,000. The Rev. John R. Dinnen, who was 
the pastor from 1878 till 1894, furnished the church, built the 
priest's house, and purchased the school property on Main 
street. The Rev. P. J. Crosson, who had charge from 1894 
till 1898, repaired the damage done the church by fire, to the 
amount of |5,000, and also had the church frescoed. The 
Rev. John Dempsey, pastor, from 1898 till 1906, added to the 
sanctuary furnishings, reduced the church debt and looked 
after the public improvements ordered by the city. While 
celebrating a funeral Requiem, on April 4, 1906, he dropped 



The Churches, Continued. 273 

dead while singing the Preface. . His successor is the present 
pastor, the Rev. W. J. Quinlan. 

In 1866, the Sisters of the Holy Cross purchased a residence 
on Main street, at a cost of |3,500, and at an expense of ^1,500 
transformed the building into St. Charles' Academy. A little 
later Father Walters, having purchased the present church 
property, also erected a frame building on it and opened a 
parochial school, conducted by the Sisters of the Holy Cross. 
This served its purpose until the present church was to be 
built, when the pupils were looked after, at the Academy. 
This state of things continued until the present priest's house 
was built, when the old priest's house was turned into a boys' 
school and so continued until it was condemned by the Board 
of Health. In 1894 the congregation bought the Academy 
from the Sisters, since which time it has been St. Bernard's 
school. The Sisters of the Holy Cross are still in charge and 
two of them take the pupils, to the number of sixty, through 
the eight grades. 

The first priest's house, a frame building, stood adjacent 
to the first church on the north side. It was Father O' Flaherty 
who built it. The second priest's house fronting on Pike 
street, at the rear of the present church, was built by Father 
Walters. The present parochial residence was erected in 1886, 
at a cost of about $3,500. St. Bernard's parish has 120 families, 
numbering 450 souls. The Societies of the parish are the 
Rosary Society, the Young Ladies' Sodality, the St. Catharine's 
Society, the League of the Sacred Heart and the Purgatorian 
Society. One boy at the parish has become a priest and 
another boy, a member of the Holy Cross Community, is 
studying for the priesthood. Two girls of the parish are now 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. The debt on the church property, 
at the present time, is |2,450. The mission Ladoga is attended 
from Crawfordsville. 



LAPORTE. 

ST. Joseph's church. 
1859. 

It was the well known missionary, Rev. F. X. Weninger, 
S. J., who in 1859 persuaded the German portion of St. Peter's 



274 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

congregation, at Laporte, to form a separate parish. The 
first pastor of this new congregation, which was placed under 
the patronage of St. Joseph, was the Rev. Martin Sherer, who 
built the present church and remained eight or nine years. 
Rev. N. Y. Konen succeeded him, for a short time. For three 
years and two months Rev. Simon Bartosz was pastor. In 
January 1870, the Rev. J. H. Oechtering took charge. He 
built the present priest's house, and added the steeple to the 
church. After a pastorate of fully ten years, Father Oechtering 
was succeeded by the Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, who bought the 
present cemetery, secured the Sisters' dwelling, procured a 
|1,500 pipe organ, frescoed the church and supplied the church 
with a full line of vestments. Father Nussbaum was a straight 
forward and outspoken man. He departed this life, as pastor 
of St. Joseph's, on December 26, 1895. For about six months 
thereafter. Rev. Julius Becks was pastor. After which time, 
owing to ill health, he was assigned to the hospital at Anderson. 

The parish school was taught by lay-teachers, from Sep- 
tember 1880 to September 1896, when the Sisters C. PP. S. 
took charge. Two of these Sisters are at present teaching 
seventy-five children. 

The present pastor, Rev. Anthony Messmann, was ap- 
pointed on July 9, 1896. During his pastorate new stained 
glass windows were placed in the church at an expense of 
|1,200. The church property has no debt on it. St. Joseph's 
parish has eighty-nine families, numbering 515 souls. The 
Rosary Society, for married women, has sixty members; the 
Young Ladies' Sodality has twenty-one members; the Holy 
Angels' Society, for children, has twenty-seven members; and 
the St. Joseph's Benevolent Association has a membership of 
forty-five. 



NEW HAVEN. 

ST. JOHN THE BAPTISTS CHURCH. 
1859. 

New Haven was settled by Puritans, who came from the 
New England States as early as 1839, when Henry Burgess 
laid out the town; but it was not incorporated until 1866. 
The first missionary Father, known to have visited New Haven, 



The Churches, Continued. 275 

was Rev. Alexius Botti, who came in the fall of 1858, and 
visited the place once a month for one year. From 1859 until 
September 1861, Rev. Grevin, residing at St. Vincent's, had 
charge of New Haven. 

The Rev. Wolfgang Giedl was the first resident pastor of 
New Haven, having Columbia City as a mission; he died on 
May 23, 1873, and his remains rest in the cemetery at New 
Haven. Rev. Sebastian Birnbaum C. PP. S. assisted Father 
Giedl during his illness, and after his death remained until a 
successor had been appointed, in the person of the Rev. Ber- 
nard Wiedau. 

The first services, held in New Haven, took place in the 
basement of Nick Schueckmann's house, and also in a rented 
dry goods store. Father Botti bought the goods, and the 
ladies made the vestments. The congregation, at the time, 
numbered twenty-three families. The old church, 30x60 feet, 
with a sacristy in the rear of the sanctuary, was erected in 
1859, at a cost of $4,000. At this time, the parish numbered 
about 120 souls. Four lots of the church property were 
bought in 1859, for |300; four more in 1864, for $400, and in 
1870 still two more at a cost of |500. On the latter two lots 
the present school-house was built, from 1872 to 1873. It is a 
two-story brick building and basement, 40x56 feet, having 
three school- rooms for 150 children, and a dwelling for the 
Sisters, costing |8,000. Several lay-teachers conducted the 
school, in a frame building 30x40 feet, till the year 1873, when 
the Sisters of St. Agnes took charge. The usual eight grades 
are taught, by three Sisters, attended by 140 children. 

The present church is a Gothic structure, and was built 
from 1876 to 1877. It has been newly decorated and furnished 
with a fine 1 1,800 organ, two new side altars, an artistic com- 
munion table, a splendid pulpit, a fine baptistry, beautiful 
statuary and three harmoniously tuned bells. The church 
cost about |20,000, and has a seating capacity of at least 500; 
and is free from all indebtedness. 

The old church is used for society meetings, and for school 
and social entertainments. The parish at present has 114 
families, numbering 508 souls. As many as twenty-four girls 
of the parish have joined religious communities. 

In 1863, the St. Mary's Altar Society was established, 



276 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

and shortly after the St. Joseph's School Society. In 1866, 
St. John's Benevolent Society was organized; and, about 
thirty years ago, the St. Rose of Lima Young Ladies' Sodality. 
These societies have done much for the church, and for the 
upbuilding of the parish, both in a financial and a spiritual 
direction. The Benevolent Society, during its forty years of 
existence, has paid out $9,000, for sick benefits, and at present 
has |3,000 in the treasury. At present the following are the 
societies and the membership: St. John's Benevolent Society, 
for- married and single men, ninety-seven; St. Mary's, for 
married women, eighty-four; St. Rose's Sodality, for single 
women, forty-five; the Holy Childhood, for children, sixty- 
five; the Confraternity of the Holy Family, 64; and the Catholic 
Knights of America, twenty-eight. 



SHELDON. 

ST. ALOYSIUS' CHURCH. 
1859. 

The priests, who had charge of Sheldon, are the following: 
Rev. Jacob Mayer, Decatur, July 1858 till 1862; Rev. Aloysius 
MeiH, from 1862 till 1863; Rev. Martin Kink, from 1863 till 
1866; Rev. Theodore Hibbelen, for a short time; Rev. William 
Woeste, from 1866 to 1872; Rev. Joseph Nussbaum, Hesse 
Cassel, from 1873 to 1876; Rev. Ferdinand Koerdt, from August 
1876 till May 1896; Rev. Rudolph J. Denk, from May 1896 till 
Spring 1900; Rev. J. H. Bathe, from April to August 12, 1900; 
Rev. H. A. Hellhake, since August 12, 1900. 

Father Mayer in 1858 celebrated Mass at the house of 
Fred. Weaver. Sixteen families constituted the congregation 
at that time. He visited the place on the third Friday of each 
month, for several years. In 1859 Christian Miller donated 
three acres of land, on the east side of the Blufi"ton road, and 
in the same year a frame church, 29x36 feet, was erected on 
this land, and was named St. Aloysius' Church. In the course 
of time the church became too small, to accommodate the 
congregation, and in 1875 Father Nussbaum added to it a 
sacristy, and at the same time built a spire, and gave the church 
a new roof, thereby involving an expense of |1,400. 

Upon his arrival at Sheldon as the new pastor, in August 



The Churches, Continued. 277 

1876, Father Koerdt at once gave his attention to repairing 
the church and also to the erection of a handsome brick priest's 
house at an expense of |3,500. On October 9, 1876, he opened 
the parochial school which for some time he taught in person. 
At the present time, three Sisters of St. Agnes teach the school, 
attended by ninety children. Father Koerdt left Sheldon free 
from all indebtedness, when on July 3, 1896, he was transferred 
to St. Peter's Church, at Fort Wayne. Rev. H. A. Hellhake 
is the present pastor. The mission BlufYton, is attended from 
Sheldon. 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. Patrick's church. 

1859. 

In the year 1859, Rev. Thomas Carroll, C. S. C, built the 
first St. Patrick's Church, a small brick structure 60x30 feet, 
with a seating capacity of 350. To pay for the erection of this 
church, Father Carroll collected money abroad. During the 
pastorate of Rev. P. P. Cooney, C. S. C, 36 feet were added to 
the length of this building, and a wing of 50x32 feet, which for 
some years served as a school, and then as a place of worship 
for German and Polish Catholics, until they were able to provide 
a church for themselves. At this time, all the Catholics on 
the west side of the St. Joseph river, about 1,250 souls, belonged 
to St. Patrick's Church. Thomas Murphy was very kind to 
Father Carroll, and until the parochial residence was built, the 
pastor made his home with Mr. Murphy, whenever in town. 
This first St. Patrick's Church was located on Division street, 
and the Grand Trunk railroad, having secured right of way on 
this street, made the situation undesirable for church purposes. 
During the pastorate of Rev. D. J. Spillard, C. S. C, the property 
was sold for |8,000, and with it the present parochial residence 
was built. 

The present property of St. Patrick's parish, was purchased 
during the pastorates of Rev. D. J. Hagerty, C. S. C, and Rev. 
John W. Clark, C. S. C, for $7,200. It extends through from 
Taylor to Scott street 400 feet, and has a frontage of 140 feet 
on Taylor street, and 100 feet on Scott street. The corner-stone 
of the present church, which is the second of St. Patrick's 



27S The Diocese of Fort Wayne, 

parish, was laid in 1886, and was completed the following year, 
Father Hagertv being the pastor. The church, with a seating 
capacity of 800, is of Gothic architecture, richly frescoed in 
cream and gold. All the furniture is of the best material and 
harmonizes with the architecture of the building. The church 
cost about $37,000, and the furnishings about |8,000. Many 
improvements have since been made to beautify the grounds, 
not to mention a thousand feet of cement walks, and an iron 
fence on Taylor street. 

The new St. Patrick's school, built in 1898 by Father 
Clark, measures 54x83 feet, and has three large class-rooms 
with accommodation for 150 children. The building also con- 
tains a large hall, a society room, and a well furnished gym- 
nasium. Its cost was $14,000. This school is for boys only, 
who are taught by the Sisters of the Holy Cross in a course of 
eight grades. Adjacent to St. Patrick's Church is St. Joseph's 
Academy, conducted by the same Sisters, which serves also as 
a parochial school for the girls, 261 pupils attend the school. 
This property belongs to the Sisters, and was provided in 1886. 
The Sisters of the Holy Cross, who teach in South Bend, all 
reside at St. Joseph's Academy. 

The first parochial residence was next to the old St. 
Patrick's Church, on Division street, and was a very fine house 
at that time, 1865, having cost $8,000. The present parochial 
residence on Taylor street was erected by Father Spillard, in 
1892, at a cost of $7,500. The debt on the church property is 
$4,000. 

The Sodality of the Children of Mary was organized in 
1866, as well as the Holy Rosary Society, canonically estab- 
lished in 1892. The present pastor. Rev, John F. DeGroote, 
C. S. C, organized the St. Cecilia's Society for girls, up to their 
seventeenth year of age, after which they become Children of 
Mary. In 1904, he organized the Holy Name Society, and in 
1905, the St. Vincent de Paul Conference. At present the num- 
ber of souls in the parish is about 1,282, or 273 families. Three 
young men of the parish have become priests, and five of its 
young women have entered religious communities. 

St. Patrick's Church has had these pastors: Rev. Thomas 
Carroll, C. S. C, from 1858 to 1864, during this time he resided 
at Notre Dame; Rev. Joseph Carrier, C. S. C, was the pastor 



The Churches, Continued. 279 

during the absence of Father OarroU, on a collecting tour; 
Rev. William Corby, C. S. C, was pastor for three or four 
months, in 1865; Rev. Peter P. Cooney, C. S. C, was pastor 
from 1865 till March 12, 1871; Rev. Daniel J. Spillard, C. S. C, 
from March 1871 till April 1874, and again from 1891 until 
1893; Rev. William O'Mahoney, C. S. C, for seven or eight 
months, 1874; Rev. John Lauth, C. S. C, for one year, 1875; 
Rev. Peter Lauth, C. S. C, from January 1876 till August 
1880; Rev. Denis J. Hagerty, C. S. C, from August 1880 till 
January 1891; Rev. John W. Clark, C. S. C, from 1893 till 
March 16, 1899; Rev. John F. DeCroote, C. S. C, pastor since 
March 29, 1899. 



ANDERSON. 

ST. Mary's church. 

1860. 

As far back as 1837, priests residing in Logansport visited 
Anderson. Prior to that time. Rev. John Claude Francois 
and Rev. Vincent Baquelin celebrated Mass here in a log tavern. 
Rev. Michael J. Clark came, for several months in 1857, from 
Lafayette, to celebrate Mass in the Court House. The number 
of souls, almost exclusively Irish, was at this time about sixty. 
It was the same Father Clark who in 1858 laid the foundation 
for the first Catholic church in Anderson on the site of the 
present St. Mary's Church. 

Rev. FitzMaurice was the first resident pastor. He was 
succeeded by Rev. John McMahon, in 1860. He built the 
first church on the foundation laid by Father Clark. It was a 
70x36 feet structure and cost about |2,000. The lot on which 
it stood was 72x144 feet and cost |100. In 1865 Father 
McMahon left for Canada. Rev. J. B. Crawley was the pastor 
from 1866 until August 1884. He secured two more lots, 
144x144 feet, at a cost of $1,000, and on July 4, 1875, laid the 
corner-stone of, and in due time finished, the second St. Mary's 
Church, which, for its day and the size of the congregation, 
was a splendid structure. He also built a parochial residence, 
a plain one-story frame building. 

Father Crawley was succeeded by Rev. F. C. Wiechmann, 
in August 1884, who during his pastorate built the present 



280 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

parochial residence, a brick structure. About this time, the 
discovery of natural gas greatly increased the membership of 
St. Mary's Church. When on May 7, 1891, Rev. D. J. Mulcahy 
was appointed pastor, he determined at once to build a church, 
commensurate with the number and importance of his rapidly 
growing congregation. Accordingly, the first church bu'lt was 
removed, and on its site the corner-stone of the new, and third, 
and present St. Mary's Church was laid on July 9, 1893; and 
on October 6, 1895, Bishop Rademacher solemnly dedicated 
the new sacred edifice to the service of God. The church has 
a seating capacity of eight hundred, and is built in the Roman- 
esque style of architecture. The interior decorations, the 
elegant stained glass windows and all the furnishings harmonize 
perfectly. The organ cost $2,500 and the fourteen Stations of 
the Cross, beautiful statue groupings, were added during the 
past year. The total cost of St. Mary's Church, as we see it 
today, was |55,000. 

St. Mary's Church has had its parochial school since 1869, 
but it was taught in very humble quarters, by lay- teachers. 
In September of 1879 the Sisters of the Holy Cross, at the 
request of Father Crawley, took charge of the parish school. 
They taught school in the first church building and lived in 
rented quarters, in the vicinity of the church, until, a new 
parochial residence having been erected, the old one became 
their place of residence. Having finished the new church, in 
1895, Father Mulcahy determined to provide more suitable 
quarters for school and for the Sisters' residence. He suc- 
ceeded in converting the old church into a school, with com- 
modious class-rooms, together with a new two-story brick 
residence for the Sisters. This work was completed on February 
2, 1898, and necessitated an outlay of $10,000. Six Sisters of 
the Holy Cross have charge of St. Mary's School with an attend- 
ance of 294 children. The diocesan course of eight grades for 
parochial schools is closely followed, and to it is added three 
years of high school. The school is supported from the church 
revenues; no tuition fee is paid by the children, and St. Mary's 
School is therefore a free school. The priest's house built in 
1884, by Father Wiechmann, is still in use without any altera- 
tion. The debt on the entire church property is $31,200. 

The parish has these Societies, for men: Catholic Knights 



The Churches, Continued. 281 

of America since 1891, with sixty-five members; Ancient Order 
of Hibernians since 1893, with fifty-three members; the Brown- 
son (Social) Club, with very fine club rooms, since 1900, 115 
members; Knights of Columbus, with 110 members. For boys: 
the Sodality since 1892, ninety-three members. For women: 
The Altar and Rosary Society since 1891, 165 members; the 
Ladies' Aid Society, caring for the needs of the parish poor, 
since 1897; the Ladies' Auxiliary A. O. H. since 1901, thirty- 
five members; the Catholic Lady Foresters, since 1901, twenty- 
eight members. For unmarried women: The Blessed Virgin's 
Sodality since 1895, 111 members; the Children of Mary, for 
girls under eighteen, since 1892, ninety-seven members. The 
St. Anthony's Society, for the colored members of the parish, 
eighteen members. Besides these there is a St. Mary's Alumni 
Association for those who have graduated from St. Mary's 
High School. 

The number of souls is 1,300. with 267 families. The 
total number of boys, who have become priests or are preparing 
for the priesthood, is seven, and six girls have become Sisters. 
One of the noteworthy men of St. Mary's Parish was John 
Hickey, who has been most generous to the parish and who 
has given the city of Anderson the splendid St. John's Hospital 
conducted by the Sisters of the Holy Cross. 

St. Mary's has had the following assistant priests: Rev. 
L. R. Paquet from November 1901 to June 1902; Rev. T. M. 
Conroy from June 8, 1902 to August 21, 1904; Rev. M. J. Ford 
from September 1, 1904 to January 18, 1906; Rev. Edmund 
Ley since January 1906. 



COLUMBIA CITY. 

ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS' CHURCH. 
1860. 

Columbia City, county seat of Whitley county, was visited 
for the first time in the spring of 1856, by the Rev. Edward M. 
Faller, pastor of St. Mary's Church, at Fort Wayne. He 
offered the Sacrifice of the Mass in a small frame house, occupied 
by Joseph Eich. Father Faller repeated these visits, from 
time to time, until the summer of 1857, when Columbia City 
was made a mission, attended from Huntington, by the Rev. 



282 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

F. Fuchs, pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's Church. Rev. Wolf- 
gang Giedl, residing at New Haven, assumed charge from 1859 
to the spring of 1860, when the Rev. Henry Schaefer bought 
ground, on Hannah street, and built a neat frame church, 
30x50 feet, completing the same in the fall of 1860. He also 
built two one-story frame buildings, to serve as school and 
priest's residence. The labor and material were furnished by 
the parishoners. 

The church becoming too small to accommodate the 
faithful, and the location not being a desirable one, steps were 
taken to purchase a new site. In 1867, three lots, 150x150 
feet, located on South Lime street, were secured at a cost of 
|250. Plans and specifications were at once drawn up for a 
Gothic structure, 44x110 feet. The corner-stone was laid by 
Father Benoit on May 27th, of the same year. In October, 
1867, the new church was dedicated by Bishop Luers and placed 
under the patronage of St. Paul of the Cross. The cost of the 
church, including furniture, was about $12,000. The seating 
capacity is three hundred. Father Schaefer continued to Hve 
in the old priest's house until 1868, when he erected the present 
house, at a cost of about 1 1,500, material and labor being 
donated. The present pastor expended about $2,500 for new 
pews, stained glass windows, altars, Stations of the Cross, 
statuary and frescoing the church. He also equipped the 
residence with all modern conveniences. In 1870 Rev. Joseph 
Rademacher succeeded Father Schaefer, who in turn was suc- 
ceeded by Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte from July 1872 to August 
20, 1875; Rev. Peter Franzen temporarily; Rev. Henry A. 
Hellhake from October 1875 to May 1, 1886. Father Hellhake 
secured the Sisters of St. Agnes to take charge of the school. 

The first school was opened in September 1861. It was 
in charge of Peter Mettler, with an attendance of about twenty- 
eight pupils. Upon the completion of the new church. Father 
Sch<xfer purchased a lot opposite the church upon which there 
was a frame building. Having repaired and remodeled the 
same, it served the purposes of school and teacher's residence. 
On May 1, 1886, Rev. A. M. Ellering was made pastor. Seeing 
the necessity for more suitable school accommodations, he at 
once began the erection of a new school building. A beautiful 
structure of red brick and sand stone trimmings, 34x54 feet, 



The Churches, Continued. 283 

with slate roof, was completed in December of the same year. 
The first floor contains two school-rooms, 25x30 feet, hall way 
and cloak room; the second floor has a large assembly hall and 
ante-room. The cost of the building together with the furniture 
was about |5,200. Since September 15, 1880, one Sister of St. 
Agnes, of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, has had charge of the school. 
The eight grades are taught. At present the school is attended 
by forty-six pupils. The school is supported by monthly 
tuition and voluntary donations. The Sisters occupy the old 
school-house, which has been remodeled for a dwelling at a 
cost of |400. The congregation is free from all indebtedness. 
The number of souls is 312, consisting of sixty-two families. 
Three girls of the parish have entered rehgious communities. 

St. Paul's Church has the following Societies: Catholic 
Knights of America, established in 1880, with seventeen mem- 
bers; the Married Men and Young Men's Society, with thirty- 
nine members; the Rosary Society for married women, with 
forty-one members, and the Young Ladies' Sodality, with 
twenty-eight members. Aside from their spiritual purposes, 
these organizations assist the pastor in a financial way. 

The pastor at Columbia City also attends the mission 
Warsaw, visiting it on the fourth Sunday of every month, and 
occasionally on week days. 



DELPHI. 

ST. Joseph's church. 
1860. 

Beginning with 1854, Delphi was regularly visited by these 
priests: Rev. Michael J. Clark, of Lafayette; Rev. D. Maloney, 
of Lafayette; Rev. Joseph Stephan, of Rensselaer; Rev. John 
McMahon, of Lafayette; Rev. William Doyle, of Logansport; 
Rev. J. A. Winter, of Lafayette. Services were held once a 
month in the old Delphi House. The number of souls at this 
time was about 150, two-thirds of them Irish and one-third 
German and French. A brick building, 35x40 feet, was bought 
in 1860 for |900. The priests visiting Delphi, as a mission, 
were Rev. George A. Hamilton, from June 8, 1860, to January 
31, 1861; Rev. John Vahey from February 1, 1861 to May 19, 
1861; Rev. Wilham Gausepohl, O. S. F., of Lafayette, from 



284 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

January 21, 1866 to December 1866; the latter visited Delphi 
every Sunday. By this time the number of souls had increased 
to 250. 

The church grounds consist of five lots, of 30x120 feet each. 
The first lot was bought April 19, 1860, for |500, the second 
April 27, 1863 for |800, and the three other lots April 20, 1899. 
These three lots with the Sisters' house cost about |3,000. 
About ten acres of ground were acquired, October 5, 1887, for 
|1,000; this ground is used for cemetery purposes. 

The foundation of St. Joseph's Church was laid by Father 
Vahey in March and April 1860, and Father Hamilton built 
the church in the fall of the same year. It was dedicated by 
Bishop de St. Palais, Bishop Luers being present, on February 
9, 1861. The building is of brick, 45x90 feet, Gothic archi- 
tecture and cost |9,000. The first building bought and used 
for divine services was now sold for |700. Rev. John Bleck- 
mann had the church frescoed, he also procured a church bell 
and an organ. Rev. Charles Romer had it redecorated in 
1894, put in a furnace in 1898, and completed the steeple in 
1899. Rev. Edward Boccard secured a new altar, put in 
electric lights, baptismal font and holy water basins. The 
seating capacity of the church is 400. 

The dimensions of St. Joseph's school building are 40x50 
feet. The building was erected by the Rev. A. B. Oechtering 
in 1863, at a cost of $2,000. Father Boccard put new desks in 
the school in 1903. Lay-teachers taught the school from 
1861 to 1875. The Sisters of Providence from 1875 to June 
1901. The Sisters of St. Joseph of Tipton since September 
1901. The eight grades are taught, two Sisters teaching sixty- 
six children. The Sisters lived in a rented house, from 1875 
to 1883. The Daly property was bought by Father Bleck- 
mann in 1883 for |1,700; but this house being too far from the 
church and school, the Weber property was secured, April 13, 
1889, for $3,000 and the old Sisters' house sold. 

The first priest's house was a one-story building of four 
rooms and stood on the lot, bought in 1863. The present 
priest's residence is a two-story brick building, with eight 
rooms, built by Rev. T. O'SuUivan, in 1869, for $2,385; Father 
Romer added a porch in 1899 and Father Boccard, in 1903, 
put in electric lights. There is no debt on the church property. 



The Churches, Coniinued. 285 

The parish has the Rosary Society, for married women, 
since 1865; the Children of Mary, since May 1, 1876; the St. 
Aloysius' Society, since 1880; the Sacred Heart League, since 
1893; the CathoHc Benevolent Legion, since 1877; the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, reorganized in 1894. The aggregate 
membership of these organizations is 262. The number of 
souls of St. Joseph's Parish at present is 431, consisting of 
ninety-six famiUes. One boy of the parish has become a priest, 
and another has joined the Christian Brotherhood; eight girls 
have entered religious communities. 

The following priests attended Delphi, when it was a 
station: Rev. Michael J. Clark, 1856; Rev. D. Maloney, 1857; 
Rev. Joseph Stephan, 1858-1859; Rev. J. McMahon, September, 
October and November of 1860; Rev. William Doyle; Rev. 
J. A. Winter and Rev. Neuber. 

The following, when it was a mission: Rev. George A. 
Hamilton, June 8, 1860, to January 31, 1861; Rev. John 
Vahey, February 1 to May 19, 1861, and Rev. William Gause- 
pohl, O. F. M., from January 1, 1866 to December 28, 1866. 

The following were the resident pastors: Rev. A. B. 
Oechtering, from May 26, 1861 to December 20, 1865; Rev. 
John Kelly, acting pastor, 1864; Rev. Timothy O'SuUivan, 
from January 1867 to April 24, 1870; Rev. J. H. Quinlan, 
from April 24, 1870 to September 14, 1871; Rev. P. M. Frawley, 
from September 14, 1871 to April 4, .1875; Rev. Matthew E. 
Campion, April and May of 1875; Rev. John Bleckmann, from 
May 9, 1875 to February 17, 1885; Rev. Henry A. Boeckelmann, 
from February 15, 1885 to December 31, 1891; Rev. Charles 
M. Romer, from January 1, 1892 to July 17, 1901, and Rev. 
Edward J. Boccard, since July 17, 1901. 



GOSHEN. 

ST. John's church. 
1860. 
Priests who had charge of this church at different times 
were: Prior to 1860, priests from Fort Wayne or Notre Dame, 
had Mass in the old Court House or private dwellings. Of these 
Rev. Alex. Granger, C. S. C, Very Rev. Edward Sorin, C. S. C, 
and Rev. Henry Vincent Shaefer are remembered; Rev. Fred- 
erick J. Holz, from 1861 till 1866, the first resident pastor; 



286 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Rev. A. B. Oechtering, from Avilla, for six months; Rev. Storr, 
resident pastor in 1867; Rev. D. Duehmig, from Avilla, one year 
till close of 1868; Rev. H. Meissner, from the close of 1868 till 
1871; Rev., D. Duehmig, from Avilla, a short time in 1871; 
Rev. J. H. Quinlan, from Elkhart, in the same year; Rev. M. 
F. Noll, from Elkhart, till 1878; Rev. H. A. Boeckelmann, 
resident pastor, from 1878 till 1880; Rev. A. J. Kroeger, from 
1880 till 1887; Rev. Adam Buchheit, from the fall of 1887 till 
1889; Rev. S. M. Venn, from August 1, 1889 till February 1, 
1900; Rev. F. A. King; Rev. W. S. Hogan, from September 7, 
1902 till February 1903; Rev. J. B. Fitzpatrick, since February 
1903. 

The church was built in 1860. The first school building 
was erected in 1867, by Father Meissner, at a cost of $500. 
This school was taught by lay-teachers. In 1881, Father 
Kroeger built a brick school-house, at a cost of $1,100. In 
that same year the Sisters of the Holy Cross were given charge 
of the school. The building is located west of the church on 
the corner of Third and Monroe streets, and its dimensions 
are, 30x40 feet. I n 1 889, the school was attended by fifty-seven 
children. The St. Joseph's Society, established in November 
1892, gives support to the school. Upon the arrival of the 
Sisters, Father Kroeger gave his frame residence to the Sisters 
and Hved in a rented house until he had provided the present 
brick residence. 

Goshen has ninety CathoHc families, numbering 362 souls. 
The school now has an attendance of seventy-three children, 
and is taught by three Sisters of the Holy Cross, in the eight 
grades. The Societies are: St. John's, for married men, forty- 
two members; the Rosary Society, for married women, sixty- 
five; the Young Ladies' SodaHty, thirty-eight; St. Agnes', for 
girls, eighteen; St. Aloysius', for boys, twenty-one; Holy Angels', 
for children, forty-three; the League of the Sacred Heart, 160 
members. Since Father Fitzpatrick's advent many repairs 
and improvements have been made on all the buildings, and 
a heating plant for all has been installed. The debt on the 
church property is only $600. 

Up to 1897 the missions Ligonier and Millersburg were 
attended from Goshen. Since 1903, Millersburg is again in 
charge of the pastor at Goshen. 



The Churches, Continued. 287 

KLAASVILLE. 

ST. Anthony's church. 
1860. 

The following is the chronological order in which, the 
priests named, had charge of Klaasville: Rev. F. X. Nigh, 
Pulaski, from 1860 to 1861; Rev. Martin Kink, Pulaski, from 
1861 to 1863; Rev. F. Fuchs, died at Klaasville October 8, 
1863; Rev. B. Rachor, St. John, and Rev. M. P. Wehrle, St. 
John, 1863 till 1866; Rev. Henry Renson, Klaasville, from 
1866 till 1869; (Rev. Martin Sherer, baptismal record, Feb- 
ruary 26, 1867;) Rev. Francis Siegelack, Hanover Centre, from 
October 1869 till May 6, 1873; Rev. F. X. Deimel, Hanover 
Centre, from June 25, 1873 till August 10, 1877; Rev. John 
H. Bathe, Klaasville, from August 10, 1877 till December 30, 
1881; Rev. Charles A. Ganzer, from January 1, 1882 till April 
27, 1891; Rev. Peter J. Weber, from April 27, 1891 till August 
1895; Rev. Adam Buchheit, from August 1895 till August 
1898; Rev. F. X. Ege, since August 13, 1898. 

The history of Klaasville goes back to 1856, when a 
number of German families settled here, who, from 1856 to 
1860, attended the church at St. John, about eight miles from 
Klaasville. The first church was a common, frame building 
with very common seats, which cost about $500. It was built 
in 1860 to 1861, and was dedicated, by Bishop Luers, Father 
Nigh having charge at the time. At this time the congrega- 
tion numbered about fourteen families, or sixty souls. In 
1878, Father Bathe built an addition to the church and the 
steeple, at a cost of |700. The seating capacity of the church 
is about 200. The church grounds comprise five and one-half 
acres of ground, four of which were donated in 1860, by the 
Klaas brothers. The place is named after Henry Klaas. 

The first priest's house was erected in 1866, by Father 
Renson, and cost about |800. The present priest's house was 
bought by Father Bathe, in 1878, for |1,125, having one and 
a half acres of ground with it. This house was repaired in 1901, 
for $220. The first priest's house has been occupied by the 
teachers of the district school, for many years. Though the 
school is a public school, the priest has free access, the popula- 



288 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

tion being almost exclusively Catholic. The church property 
is free from debt. The parish has thirty families, numbering 
150 souls. Five girls of the parish have become Sisters. 

From 1877 to 1896, Lowell was attended from Klaasville. 
From 1869 till 1877, Klaasville was attended from Hanover 
Centre. From 1860 till 1886, the pastors of Klaasville resided 
with Henry Klaas. 

The Young Ladies' Sodality was established in March 
1882; St. Aloysius Young Men's Society in June, of the same 
year; and the Altar Society was organized, in 1873. 



KOKOMO. 

ST. Patrick's church. 
1860. 

Kokomo was named after an Indian chief, and signifies 
poplar, in the Indian tongue. The town was laid out, in 1844, 
and consisted of forty acres of land. We give here a list of 
the priests, who have served the Catholic people at Kokomo, 
as far back as 1850. Other priests may have visited the place, 
or rather this region of country, but there is no record to that 
effect. The names are: Of those who visited Kokomo when 
a station. Rev. D. Maloney, Rev. William Doyle. Priests who 
visited Kokomo when a mission, from 1859 till September 
1869, Rev. George Hamilton, Rev. B. J. Force, Rev. Bernard 
Kroeger, Rev. Michael Hanley, Rev. B. T. Borg, Rev. Simon 
Siegrist, Rev. C. Mougin, Rev. Lawrence Lamoor, Rev. J. 
Kelly. The resident pastors: Rev. Patrick Frawley, from Sep- 
tember 1869 till October 1871; Rev. J. H. O'Brien, from Octo- 
ber 1871 till June 1872; Rev. John Grogan, from June 1872 to 
September 1873; Rev. Francis Lordemann, since September 
1873. 

On January 24, 1859, two lots were secured and in the 
year following Father Hamilton erected the first church, a 
small, frame building but sufficient for the time. A sacristy 
was added to this building by Father Frawley. The congre- 
gation, at this time, comprised about forty famihes. In 1874, 
Father Lordemann built the parochial residence, still in use. 



The Churches, Continued. 289 

In 1875, he bought the lot north of his residence. The old 
church, having become entirely inadequate, was removed to 
an adjoining lot and, in its place, was erected a brick church, 
56x115 feet, with a seating capacity of 700. It was dedicated 
by Bishop Dwenger, in 1877. Its cost was about $20,000. In 
1900, two lots on Fremont street, were secured for Si, 600. 
In 1903, the parochial residence was improved and enlarged, 
was equipped with a steam heating apparatus, and newly 
furnished throughout, at an expense of about |4,000. 

The first school was organized, in 1874, when part of the 
church was partitioned off, and used for school purposes, with 
an attendance of about thirty-five pupils. In 1877, the old 
church building was fitted up for school, accommodating 130 
pupils. The attendance at this time was sixty. But, to 
accommodate the increasing number of children, a new school 
building was erected, in 1893, and was dedicated by Bishop 
Rademacher. It is a two-story brick building, 40x65 feet, 
costing about $11,000. The attendance had increased to 160. 
In October, 1904, an addition consisting of a Sisters' residence 
and a basement costing $3,500, was added to the school building, 
now known as St. Francis' Academy. The Sisters of St. 
Joseph have charge of the school, the usual eight grades and 
high school are taught. There is no debt on the church prop- 
erty at present. The church which has served its purpose so 
well, is found inadequate to accommodate the Catholic popu- 
lation of Kokomo. Father Lordemann has begun the erection 
of a new church, which will be 150 feet long, 64 feet wide in the 
nave, and 84 feet in the transept. A basement 12 feet high is 
under the entire building. It is to be of Bedford stone and of 
Gothic architecture. The height of the main tower is 175 feet, 
and that of the north tower 130 feet. When completed it 
will have cost $75,000. 

St. Patrick's Congregation has these societies: The Cath- 
olic Benevolent Legion, since 1882; the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians; the Rosary Society, since 1862, which during its existence 
has furnished the church with a bell, two side altars, three 
statues, baptismal font, vestments, etc.; the Young Ladies' 
Sodality, since 1871, which furnished the main altar and many 
of its ornaments; the League of the Sacred Heart, since 1900; 
the Kokomo Zouaves, composed of boys of the congregation 



290 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

under twenty years of age, organized in 1899, which won the 
prize of a gold medal at a competitive drill at Elwood, on July 
4, 1900; the Knights of Columbus, since 1902, with a member- 
ship of 125. Two boys of St. Patrick's are studying for the 
priesthood, and five girls have entered religious communities. 
The parish has 189 families, numbering 825 souls. Four 
Sisters of St. Joseph have charge of the school, attended by 
208 pupils. 

St. Michael's Church, at Bunker Hill, in Miami county, 
is visited by Father Lordemann three or four times a year. 

JAY COUNTY. 

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH. 
1861. 

Holy Trinity church is located in Wabash township, Jay 
county. In the year 1854, on August 24, Rev. Wihbald Wilh, 
C. PP. S., accompanied by two Brothers and four Sisters of 
the Precious Blood Community, came to these parts and on 
240 acres of land built several log houses and a log chapel, as 
the establishment of a new mission house of the Community 
of the Most Precious Blood. For the first ten years the small 
band consisted of one priest, five Brothers and twenty Sisters. 
The entire Catholic population of Wabash township, at this 
time, consisted of three famihes. In the year 1861, Rev. 
Rochus Schueley, C. PP. S., erected Holy Trinity Church. It 
was a log house rather than a church, 27x40 feet, with a seating 
capacity of about 100, costing in money |100. At this time 
the congregation numbered about forty souls. Holy Trinity 
Church is about one mile distant from the mission house, and 
convent chapel of the Community. 

The priests in charge of the parish were the following: 
Rev. Rochus Schueley, C. PP. S., from 1862 till 1864; Rev. 
Engelbert Ruflf, C. PP. S., from 1864 till 1866; Rev. Jacob 
Ringele, C. PP. S., from 1866 to 1869; Rev. Peter Capeder, 
C. PP. S., from 1869 till 1871; Rev. Paul Reuter, C. PP. S., 
from 1871 till 1876; Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., from 
1876 till 1877; Rev. Fehx Graf, C. PP. S., from 1877 till 1878; 
Rev. Joseph Uphaus, C. PP. S., from 1878 till 1888; Rev. 
John Nageleisen, C. PP. S., from 1888 till 1892; Rev. George 



The Churches, Continued. 291 

Fleisch, C. PP. S., from 1892 till. 1898; Rev. Anthony Dick, 
C. PP. S., from 1898 till 1901; Rev. Julius Heifner, C. PP. S., 
from 1901 till 1906; Rev. Seraphine Kunkler, C. PP. S., since 
1906. 

As to nationality Holy Trinity parish is German. The 
church property consists of four acres of land, donated by 
P. Didion. The old log church is no more and in its place 
stands now a stately brick church, 130x50 feet. It was built 
by Father Uphaus, at a cost of $18,000. The seating capacity 
is 600, and the style of architecture is Gothic. The steeple 
is 100 feet high. At the time the church was built, the congre- 
gation numbered sixty families. 

The school, built in 1880 by the same Father, at a cost of 
|500, is 24x24 feet, with accommodations for 100 pupils. Two 
Sisters of the Most Precious Blood teach the school, attended 
by sixty-six children. The parish church has no priest's house, 
the pastor residing at the mission house; nor has it a residence 
for the Sisters, the Sisters residing in their convent. The 
church property has a debt of $200. The number of souls at 
the present time is 350, consisting of seventy families. Five 
boys of the parish have become priests C. PP. S., and three 
girls have entered the convent. 

Holy Trinity has St. Joseph's Society, for married men, 
forty members; the Christian Mothers', for married women, 
thirty-six members; St. John's Society, for single men, forty- 
two members; St. Rose's Society, for single women, thirty-five 
members; the Children of Mary, thirteen members, and the 
Holy Childhood, fifty-five members. 



ATTICA. 

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER'S CHURCH. 

1862. 

The construction of the Wabash railroad and bridge across 
the river, in 1850 and 1851, brought a number of Catholic 
families to Attica. Rev. Michael Clark and later, Rev. Edward 
O'Flaherty, attended them making their home with James 
Sheridan and celebrating Mass in private houses or public 
halls. At the time, there were about twenty-five Catholic 
families in and around Attica. Many members of the congre- 



292 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

gation are descendants of the pioneers of those days. Powers' 
will bequeathed two lots and |600 for the erection of a church. 
These lots, located near the Wabash depot, were exchanged 
for one lot on Perry street, near Monroe. During Father 
O' Flaherty's absence to the old country, Rev. F. Joseph 
Stephan collected an additional |600 and erected a frame 
church, in 1862. At the suggestion of Bishop Luers, a second 
lot was bought for |300, on which stood a house used later for 
a priest's house. 

It was in 1863, that Attica received its first resident 
pastor, in the person of Rev. Joseph Rademacher, who also 
attended Covington and the entire country, east and west, 
from Odell to the Illinois State Line. He found the church 
and house devoid of every convenience. The pews in the 
church were rough boards and store boxes. He procured pews, 
an altar and a little reed organ. In 1865, he prepared a class 
and admitted them to their first Holy Communion, in May. 
On this occasion. Bishop Luers also administered Confirma- 
tion. The congregation was small, and poor, and Father 
Rademacher submitted without complaint, to many priva- 
tions and hardships. In the year 1870, Rev. John Bleckmann 
succeeded Father Rademacher. He bought the cemetery 
grounds. The most necessary repairs and improvements on 
the priest's house were made by him. He also built an addition 
to the church, in which a Catholic school was taught for a while, 
but for a lack of funds had to be discontinued. 

Father Bleckmann was succeeded by Rev. Thomas Cahill, 
whose successor, in May 1875, was Rev. Dominic Meier, O. F. M. 
He resided at Lafayette, attending Attica from there, and 
receiving |300 per annum, and railroad fare, for his services. 
The Rev. John A. Mark was appointed pastor at Attica in 
April, 1876, and was succeeded by Rev. Henry M. Plaster in 
January, 1880. In that year Covington was made an inde- 
pendent congregation. Father Plaster preferring it to Attica, 
Rev. Charles Lemper was sent to Attica in August, of the 
same year. The first ten years of Father Lemper's pastorate, 
were productive of an iron fence around the cemetery, an 
addition to the priest's house and other necessary improvements. 
The building of a new church was determined on, in 1890. All 
the stone for the foundation were donated and the farmers 



^The Churches, Continued. 293 

did the hauling. A member of the parish burnt the brick on 
his place, and boarded the laborers, whilst the congregation 
paid their wages, and the farmers again did the hauling of 
brick, sand and other material. The church was dedicated by 
Bishop Rademacher, of Nashville, on June 21, 1891. 

In 1895, Father Lemper built the present priest's house. 
In the same year Father Lemper arranged the addition to the 
old church for a dwelling for the Sisters, and having parti- 
tioned the old church into two school-rooms, he reopened the 
parochial school. On account of inadequate school accom- 
modations, as well as accommodations for the Sisters, and the 
greatly reduced number of children attending, the school was 
abandoned, some seven or eight years later. When Father 
Lemper left the parish, there was a debt of $2,541.83. Father 
Lemper secured assistance from far and near, outside of the parish. 

Rev. A. Henneberger was appointed the pastor at Attica, 
in July 1898. He enjoyed poor health, but hoped to be bene- 
fitted by this change; the change, however, did not benefit 
him, on the contrary his health grew steadily worse. He was 
removed, and on May 5, 1899 the present pastor Rev. F. Von 
Schwedler took charge of the parish. At the present time 
there is no debt on the church property. The number of souls 
is steadily increasing and a larger church will have to be pro- 
vided in the near future. The congregation has ninety-two 
families, numbering 394 souls. The parish has an Altar Society, 
for married women, with forty-seven members, an Altar Society, 
for single women, with twenty members and the Catholic 
Foresters. 



OXFORD. 

ST. Patrick's church. 

1863. 



The Rev. Joseph Stephan, it would seem, was the first to 
visit the Catholics of Oxford and surroundings. He was at 
the time visiting many other places. He said Mass, at Oxford, 
in the Court house, public school house and in various private 
Houses, and was in the habit of coming here from 1860 till 
1863. Until 1867 Rev. E. B. Kilroy attended here. It was 
he who laid the foundation for the present church, in the year 



294 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1863, There being no railroad transportation in those days, 
building material had to be hauled a long distance, and required 
much time. The church however was put under roof. Father 
Stephan still calling occasionally, and also Rev. C. J. O'Calla- 
ghan. The latter was the first resident pastor at Oxford. The 
baptismal records begin with July 1867. In 1870 Father 
O'Callaghan was succeeded by Rev. John R. Dinnen, during 
whose pastorate, the church was plastered, and some old pews 
and furniture obtained from Lafayette. The dimensions of 
the church are 76x36 feet, with an elevation of 25 feet. The 
probable cost of the church was |6,000. The congregation, 
at that time, numbering about 175 souls, was larger than it is 
now. The church grounds consist of four acres of land. Father 
Dinnen remained until October, 1875, and was succeeded by 
Rev. Meinrad McCarthy, O. S. B., after whom came Rev. John 
F. Lang from October 1877 till April 1882. Rev. P. J. Crosson 
was pastor until September 1894, Rev. Julius Becks until June 
1895, when the Rev. William C. Miller was sent here and 
remained until October 6, 1906. The Rev. F. X. Labonte had 
charge from October 30, 1906 till March 21, 1907. It is re- 
lated of Father McCarthy that on a Christmas day he celebrated 
the first Mass in St. Bridget's Church (Barrydale), rode his 
little pony to Fowler, where he said the second Mass, and then 
rode to Oxford to celebrate the third Mass. The church was 
repaired and refurnished by Father Miller, who put in new 
stained glass windows, in 1896, and repaired the whole building 
in 1904, arching the ceiling, frescoing the interior, redecorating 
and painting the altars, pews etc., at a total cost of |3,500. 
The congregation has only twenty-eight families, or 113 souls, 
and has no debt on its church property. 

The first priest's house was a small cottage, built by 
Father Dinnen, for about |800. It was remodeled and refur- 
nished at a cost of |1,350 by Father Miller. The Altar Society, 
with thirty members, takes care of the altar and sanctuary, 
and supplies its wants, such as candles, oil, linens, etc. One 
girl of the parish became a Sister of Providence. 

Oxford was supplied by the Rev. J. R. Dinnen from 
March 21, 1907, the date on which Father Labonte died, until 
June 8, 1907, when St. Patrick's Church again received a resident 
pastor, in the person of Rev. H. C. Kappel. 



The Churches, Continued. 295 

PLYMOUTH. 

ST. Michael's church. 

1863. 

The treaty of the United States with the Indians, in 1832, 
assigned as their reserve to the Pottawottamies, a region of 
country to the southwest of Plymouth, its northeastern corner 
being near the western border of the town. The Pottawot- 
tamies were Catholics, and a good sized chapel, built of logs, 
occupied a site on the north bank of one of the Twin Lakes. 
The building has long since disappeared. Prior to 1842, the 
early missionaries such as Fathers Allouez, Aveneau and other 
Jesuit Fathers, as well as Father Badin, visited these regions. 
From 1842, however, the Fathers, of the Congregation of the 
Holy Cross, attended to the spiritual wants of these Indians 
and the early Catholic settlers, in Marshall county. In 1838, 
Father Petit, at the earnest entreaty of the officers of United 
States mihtary forces, conducted the Indians from their reser- 
vation to their new home, in the west. 

The history of the present St. Michael's Congregation 
dates back to 1856, when on December 19th, three lots were 
bought on which now stand the church, the priest's house and 
the school. The total cost of the three lots was |500. The 
first resident pastor was Rev. Gabriel Volkert, from 1862 to 
1864. St. Michael's Church was built in 1863, and was dedi- 
cated by Bishop Luers, in September of that year. Rev. 
George Steiner was pastor from 1864 to 1866. After him came 
Rev. Francis Siegelack, from 1866 to 1869. He organized the 
St. Boniface's Benevolent Society. The Rev. George Zur- 
wellen took charge of the parish, in October 1869, and remained 
till the time of his death, February 5, 1883. A school had been 
in operation since 1861, taught by lay-teachers. The building 
was a long building with a boarded partition, which separated 
the school from the stable. When Father Zurwellen began 
his work, the school and stable combination was removed to 
the back part of the lot, on which the pastoral residence stands 
today, and the priest's house was removed from the extreme 
south to its present location. A brick school-house, costing 
$12,000, known today as St. Michael's Academy, was erected 
in 1870. About this time a bell was bought. 



296 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

On November 20, 1872, the three lots opposite the church 
were bought. These lots front to the north, and the present 
St. Joseph's Hall is situated on one of them, lot 67. The first 
cemetery of St. Michael's Congregation was one acre of ground, 
donated by John Hughes, and was used until 1871; when the 
city of Plymouth gave the Catholics the privilege of using a 
portion of Oak Hill cemetery. This continued until April 15, 
1875, when Father Zurwellen secured the four acres of ground, 
which are used today for burials. The Rev. Louis A. Moench 
was the resident pastor, from February 6, 1883 until July 26, 
1898. The debt of |5,000 was paid by him, the pastoral resi- 
dence was built at a cost of |1,200, the church was frescoed 
for |660, beautiful new altars were provided, St. Joseph's Hall 
was built, at a cost of $1,300, stained glass windows were placed 
in the church, a new iron fence was built and sidewalks put 
down. The delivery from church debt was duly celebrated on 
February 18, 1890. Succeeding Father Moench the following 
were the pastors here: Rev. Charles Lemper, from 1898 till 
his death on December 13, 1900; Rev. Peter Schmitt, from 
July 1900, during the illness and after the death of Father 
Lemper, till March 1, 1901; Rev. Simon M. Yenn, from March 
1, 1901 till July 1, 1905; Rev. Henry C. Kappel, from July 1, 
till September 1, 1905; Rev. John Tremmel since September 1, 
1905. Father Yenn made many necessary repairs and im- 
provements on the entire church property, including the 
grounds. Three acres of the cemetery, consisting of six acres, 
also received much needed attention from Father Yenn. At 
the time of his removal the fund for a new church had accumu- 
lated the handsome amount of $9,000. During this time the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross enlarged their Academy, which serves 
also for parochial school, twice; it being now a commodious 
structure of three-stories and basement, running back from 
street to alley. Center street was improved during the pas- 
torate of Father Tremmel. At the present time the fund for 
a new church amounts to $9,616.13. 

Plymouth has 114 Catholic families, numbering 518 souls. 
The parochial school, in connection with the academy, having 
an attendance of ninety-eight pupils, is conducted by four 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. The church societies are: The 
Rosary Society, with ninety-five members; the Sacred Heart 



The Churches, Continued. 297 

Sodality, with sixty-seven; and the Children of Mary, with 
thirty-four members. Other associations are, the St. Boniface, 
the Benefit Association of Our Lady of Loretto, and the St. 
Vincent de Paul Aid Society. 



EGE. 

CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 
1864. 

When Ege was visited for the first time, in 1856, as a 
station, by Rev. Francis Deschamp, it was called Girardot 
Settlement. It was in 1853, that Gabriel Girardot emigrated 
from France and settled on a farm, where Ege is now located. 
When Father Deschamp visited the place, he found nine 
families in that neighborhood. The Rev. Henry Vincent 
Schaefer, pastor at Avilla, visited Ege as a station, and in 1863 
the first church, 25x40 feet, was built. In July, of that year, 
Bishop Luers and Father Benoit celebrated Mass in the un- 
finished church — they were at the time prospecting for a loca- 
tion, where to build the diocesan orphan asylum. Gabriel 
Girardot had preceded his family to this country and had made 
a vow that he would build a church if he would see his family 
in the New World. He donated two acres of land, where the 
cemetery now is, and there he constructed a church and made 
most of the furniture with his own hands. In consequence, 
the church was a long time building, and was not finished until 
May, 1864. When completed, the little frame church was 
valued at |1,000. After Father Schsefer, the pastors of Avilla 
had charge of Ege as a mission; namely: Rev. Francis Deipen- 
brock, 1863; Rev. John Wemhoflf, from December 1863 till 
December 1865; Rev. A. B. Oechtering, from December 1865 
till May 12, 1867; and Rev. Dominic Duehmig, from May 12, 
1867 till 1876. During this time, the Fathers of the Holy 
Cross would frequently relieve the pastors of Avilla, by attend- 
ing the mission Ege. In 1875, Father Duehmig purchased four 
acres of land, at a short distance from the church westward, 
where two roads cross and there put up a more spacious frame 
church, 35x90 feet, with a seating capacity of 260. The old 
church was moved to the new place and an addition was made 
to it; after which it served the various purposes of a school- 



298 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

house, of a teacher's residence, and of a priest's house, until 
1885. The Sisters of St. Francis, of JoHet, took charge of the 
school, in 1879. 

The Rev. WilHam Geers was the first resident pastor of 
Ege, in 1876, and was succeeded by the Rev. Peter Franzen, 
from February 1877 until October 1878. After him came 
Rev. F. X. Ege, from October 1878 until November 1897. He 
found the church property indebted to the amount of |3,500. 
In 1885, the old church burned down, insured for $500. Father 
Ege thereafter erected a two-story brick building, 30x65 feet, 
the lower front room accommodating sixty pupils, and the 
upper front room being used for parish meetings and enter- 
tainments, until January 1898, when it too was used for school 
purposes. The other parts of this building serve the Sisters 
for a residence of six rooms. In 1878, Father Ege erected a 
handsome two-story, ten room priest's house, at a cost of $3,000. 

The present pastor. Rev. Francis P. Faust, took charge 
of the parish in November, 1897. He found that the parish 
had a debt of only $300. He has made various improvements 
and many repairs, with several purchases, amounting to fully 
$2,500, and there is a debt of $243 on the church property. 
The church grounds proper comprise four acres; and the two 
acres of the old church is now used for burial purposes. Two 
members of the parish have become Franciscan Brothers and 
five have become Sisters. The number of souls is 408, consist- 
ing of seventy-five families. 

St. Mary's Society, for married women, has forty members; 
St. Rose's, for single women, thirty; and the Apostleship of 
Prayer, ninety members. 



KENTLAND. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1864. 

The Rev. George A. Hamilton visited Kentland and 
vicinity, from 1861 to 1864, from Logansport. After him, it 
was attended from Rensselaer by Rev. Joseph A. Stephan, 
until 1870. He visited the place once a month, celebrating 
Mass in the Court House or in Kent's hotel, boarding with 
John H. Schmitt, a mile and three-quarters from Kentland. 



The Churches, Continued. 299 

The Catholics numbered about fifteen famiUes, Irish, German 
and French, within a radius of twelve miles. In 1864 Father 
Stephan erected the first church, a frame structure, 24x40 feet. 

The grounds, on which the church, priest's house, the 
school and the teachers' house stand, have a frontage of about 
360 feet, with a depth of 150 feet. Opposite this ground the 
church owns two acres, just outside the corporation of Kentland. 
The cemetery has five acres, one mile south of the church. 
These grounds were secured during the pastorates of Revs. 
J. Stephan, A. Messmann, and W. C. Miller. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Anthony Messmann, 
from 1870 to 1881. He resided with the above mentioned 
John H. Schmitt until 1872, when the priest's house was built. 
He added 30 feet to the church, to gain more room. Rev. 
F. X. Baumgartner added a sacristy, 28x14 feet, built a tower 
and supplied it with a bell. Father Baumgartner was pastor 
from 1881 to March 1883. After him came Rev. William C. 
Miller, from March 1883 to September 1891. Father Miller 
built the present church, in 1888. It is a brick building, 
100x45 feet and 24 feet in height. It has stained glass windows 
of Roman style; the ceiling is flat. The Main Altar of the old 
church was transferred to the new church, and two neat side 
altars and two confessionals were provided. The cost of this 
church was |9,000. It has a seating capacity of 400. 

Rev. Charles A. Ganzer was pastor from September 1891 
to December 10, 1902. He renovated the church and made 
necessary repairs, giving the church a new roof and purchasing 
a beautiful Main Altar. The church was also frescoed and 
electric lighting provided, another bell was procured, a new 
way of the Cross secured, a new pipe organ and a steam heating 
plant installed. The present pastor. Rev. Charles V. Stetter, 
D. D., holding that position since February 13, 1903, enriched 
the sanctuary for Christmas, 1905, with an artistic crib. 

Father Messmann started a school in 1872, but it had to 
be discontinued. The school was a frame building, 44x18 
feet. In 1885, Father Miller reopened the school. It was 
taught by lay teachers till 1887, when the Sisters of St. Francis 
took charge. In 1888, Father Miller remodeled the old church 
into a two-room school-house. The old school building and 
the sacristy of the old church were made into a residence for 



300 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the Sisters. Father Stetter built a porch to it. The dimensions 
of the school are 40x70 feet, accommodating ninety children. 
The eight grades are taught. Two Sisters have charge of 
ninety-five pupils at present. 

The priest's house, built in 1872 by Father Messmann, is 
a nine room two-story brick structure. It was Father Miller, 
who finished the entire house and furnished it more completely. 
Father Stetter also has done something in that direction. The 
church property has a debt of |2, 11 9.98. The number of souls 
is 540, consisting of 106 families. One boy of Kentland has 
become a priest and ten girls Sisters. St. Anthony's, Goodland 
and Remington were attended from Kentland, for some time. 

The following priests had charge of Kentland: Rev. 
George A. Hamilton, from Logansport, and perhaps others, 
from 1861 till 1864; Rev. Joseph A. Stephan, from Rensselaer, 
from 1864 till April 1, 1870; Rev. Anthony Messmann, pastor 
from April 1, 1870 till December 19, 1880; Rev. F. X. Baum- 
gartner, from December 19, 1880 till March 27, 1883; Rev. 
WilHam C. Miller, from March 31, 1883 till August 30, 1891; 
Rev. Charles A. Ganzer, from August 30, 1891 to December 10, 
1902; Rev. Charles Meyer, C. PP. S., Rev. Frederick Schalk, 
C. PP. S., and Rev. Virgilius Krull, C. PP. S., from December 
10, 1902 till February 13, 1903; Rev. Charles V. Stetter, D. D., 
since February 13, 1903. 

The following societies are found here: The Cemetery 
Association with eighty members; the Rosary Society, for 
married women, since 1884, with seventy-nine members; the 
Sodality of the Sacred Heart for single women, with sixty-one 
members; the St. Aloysius' Society for young men, with forty 
members; the Catholic Benevolent Legion and the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. 



WABASH. 

ST. Bernard's church. 
1864. 



The first priest on record at Wabash, is Rev. John Ryan, 
who residing at Lagro occasionally attended Wabash, from 
1862 to September 1865. He celebrated Mass at the homes 
of Patrick Ivory and others. At this time the number of souls 



The Churches, Coniinued. 301 

was thirty-five, Irish and German. The foundation for the 
new church was put down, in 1864, by Father Ryan, and the 
building was begun by Rev. B. Kroeger, and completed during 
the pastorates of Rev. George Steiner, and Rev. M. E. Campion, 
the latter two residing at Lagro. The building cost about 
|2,000, and the number of souls at this time was about forty. 
A lot, donated by Patrick Dwyer 66x132, was given in trade 
for two lots making the grounds 132x132 feet. This business 
was transacted by Father Ryan. The church built in 1864 
was a brick building, 30x60 feet, to which Rev. P. J. Crosson 
added sixteen feet, in 1898. The same had the interior deco- 
rated and put in electric lights, at a cost of |700. The seating 
capacity of this church was 250. A frame school-house, 20x30 
feet costing $800, was built by Rev. F. C. Wiechmann in 1877, 
but the school had to be discontinued after the first year, for 
want of support. The first priest's house was located on the 
corner of Maple and Comstock streets, a half block west of the 
church; but in 1888, Rev. John H. Bathe built a new house on 
the corner of Minor and Fisher streets and adjacent to the 
church, at a cost of about |1,700; and in 1898, Rev. P. J. 
Crosson enlarged it, at an expenditure of about $500. 

The described church property was exchanged by Rev. 
Robert J. Pratt, for a church and house, ov/ned by the Metho- 
dists, on the northeast corner of Sinclair and Cass streets. This 
church is a two-story brick building, the second story used 
for church purposes has a seating capacity of 500. The house, 
adjacent to this church, which is the present priest's residence, 
is a commodious two-story brick building. The Methodist 
people had expended fully $22,000 on these buildings. The 
church and house have a frontage of 96 feet on Sinclair street 
and 123 feet on Cass street. St. Bernard's Congregation 
secured this property, in exchange for their church and house, 
by paying a cash difference of $5,500. This business was 
transacted on April 17, 1900, and, on the same day, two lots 
264x264 feet, with a large brick residence, just back of the 
church property were bought, with the intention of using it 
for school purposes at some future time. This last purchase 
cost the congregation $4,000 in cash, and the first priest's 
house on Comstock and Maple streets, valued at $1,500. The 
church was remodeled, and $3,500 was spent in doing this; 



302 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

besides furnishing the church with altars, confessionals, sacred 
vessels and also putting in a heating system. The Very Rev. 
J. H. Guendling, Administrator of the diocese, dedicated the 
building on September 23, 1900, the Rev. D. H. Clark, of 
Columbus, Ohio, preaching the sermon. The church has a 
debt of |2,900. 

St. Bernard's Church has the Confraternity for the Poor 
Souls, since 1889; the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, since 
1898; the Young Ladies' Sodality, since 1900; the Catholic 
Knights of America, since 1885; the Lady Foresters since 1899. 
The congregation numbers 403 souls, or 102 families. Two 
girls of the parish have entered the religious state of life. 

The visiting pastors of the parish have been: Rev. John 
Ryan, Lagro, 1862 till September 1865; Rev. B. Kroeger, Peru, 
September 1865 till December 1866; Rev. George Steiner, 
Lagro, December 1866 till July 1868; Rev. M. E. Campion, 
Lagro, August 1868 to 1871. The resident pastors were: 
Rev. F. C. Wiechmann, from February 1871 till October 1879; 
Rev. M. M. Hallinan, D. D., from November 1879 till Novem- 
ber 1881; Rev. John H. Bathe, from December 1881 to May 
1898; Rev. P. J. Crosson, from May 1898 to January 30, 1900; 
Rev. Robert J. Pratt, since January 30, 1900. 



FORT WAYNE. 

ST. Paul's church. 

1865. 



The Catholics of the northwestern part of Fort Wayne, 
anxious to improve their church accommodations, took steps 
to form a new congregation. A meeting representing the 
thirty-five families of this district was held, on November 15, 
1863. Bishop Luers approved the intention of these Catholics 
to build a church, and gave his consent to the purchase of a 
building site. A number of other meetings were held to accom- 
plish the end in view. Some opposition, however, was experi- 
enced on the part of Rev. Joseph Weutz, then pastor of St. 
Mary's Church. Bishop Luers explained later, that the oppo- 
sition arose from a misunderstanding. Finally, on February 
2, 1865, property was bought on the southeast corner of Griffith 
street (now Fairfield avenue) and Washington boulevard, at a 



The Churches, Continued. 303 

cost of |3,500 from George W. Ewing; ten years' time was 
given to pay the price. A frame church, 75 feet long and 37 
feet wide, was erected at a cost of $3,700. A unique method 
of securing funds was resorted to, by renting the pews of the 
church not yet built. The church was dedicated, by Bishop 
Luers, on the first Sunday in October, 1865. On December 
16, 1865, Bishop Luers gave St. Paul's Church their first pastor, 
in the person of Rev. Edward Koenig; the Bishop himself 
introducing Father Koenig to the congregation. 

Father Koenig at once organized a School Society and an 
Altar Society. The Bishop fixed the 25th of January of each 
year, the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, as the patron 
feast of the Church. Already on January 19, 1866, the zealous 
pastor opened the parochial school, with Louis Weiser as the 
first teacher and an attendance of sixty-eight children. 

Two additional lots were bought on January 28, 1866, for 
|5,000. During Lent, of the same year, the Rosary Society 
was established, and on March 25th, the Confraternity of the 
Scapular of Mount Carmel. Still another lot was bought in 
July 1866 for 1 1,400. Louis Weiser, the first teacher, went to 
the seminary and Peter Mettler succeeded him as teacher. 
In September 1867, the boys and girls began to be taught in 
separate school-rooms: Clementine Koenig, sister of Father 
Koenig, teaching the girls. The frame school building having 
become entirely inadequate, a brick school-house was erected 
at a cost of |3,308, and in September 1868 the same was ready 
for occupancy. The same building is used for school purposes 
at the present time. When in 1868, Franciscan Fathers gave 
a Mission, the Young Men's Sodality, under the patronage of 
St. Anthony of Padua, and the Young Ladies' Sodality, under 
that of St. Agnes, were established on September 21st. 

The church property is made up of 92x150 feet on the 
southeast corner, and of 127^x150 feet, on the northeast corner 
of Washington boulevard and Fairfield avenue; and of 48x150 
feet on Washington boulevard; the latter was bought in 1903 
and is now used as the priest's house. The cost of the residence 
and property was |1 1,500. The first property was bought 
before a priest had charge, Father Koenig bought the second, 
and the present pastor the last mentioned. 

The present church was erected by Father Koenig in 1886, 



304 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

at a cost of about $55,000. It was built in the Roman style 
of architecture. The furniture is all solid oak. The seating 
capacity is about 600. On January 22, 1898, Father Koenig, 
after thirty-three years of arduous pastoral work, was called 
to his reward. 

Bishop Rademacher appointed Rev. H. F. Joseph Kroll, 
to succeed Father Koenig, on February 21, 1898. The new 
pastor found a debt of $17,000 on the church property. A 
number of improvements had become necessary, which received 
immediate attention by Father Kroll. It was he who bought 
the present priest's house for $11,500 and converted the former 
pastoral residence on Fairfield avenue into a school; this resi- 
dence had been erected by Father Koenig in 1881 at a cost of 
$6,586. The school can accommodate about 150 children. 
At the present time four Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ have 
charge of the school. The school is well graded, eight grades 
being taught. The school is supported by St. Paul's School 
Society. At present 101 children are in attendance at school. 

Three boys of the parish have become priests and one boy 
is now at his studies. Nine girls have become Sisters. 

The parish has 148 families and the total number of souls 
is 675. The societies are: The School Society, 110 members; 
the Altar and Rosary Society, for married women, 1 10 members ; 
St. Anthony's Sodality, for single men, thirty-five members; 
St. Agnes' Sodality, for single women, sixty-five members; 
the Boys' Sodality, thirty-four members; the Girls' Sodality, 
forty-two members; the Purgatorian Society, fifty members; 
the Scapular Confraternity, 150 members; the Sacred Heart 
League, 250 members, and the St. Joseph's Benevolent League, 
with sixty-one members. 



COVINGTON. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1865. 



The succession of priests, who cared for the spiritual 
welfare of Catholics in Covington and vicinity, were: Rev. 
Edward O' Flaherty, prior to 1859; Rev. Joseph Stephan, from 



The Churches, Continued. 305 

1859 till 1863; Rev. Joseph Radenjacher, from 1863 till 1870; 
Rev. John Bleckmann, from 1870 till 1875; Rev. Thomas 
Cahill, from 1875 till 1876; Rev. John A. Mark, from 1876 till 
1880; Rev. H. M. Plaster, from 1880 till August 15, 1885, first 
resident pastor; Revs. King, Lentz, Lemper, from 1885 till 
1891; Rev. John Tremmel, from August 1891 till September 1, 
1905; Rev. Peter Schmitt, since September 13, 1905. 

Father O' Flaherty attended Covington from Crawfords- 
ville. The number of souls in 1859 was about 350, or sixty 
families, of Irish nationality. Father Stephan laid the founda- 
tion of the church in 1860, and Father Rademacher completed 
it in 1865. Bishop Luers dedicated the building in October, 
1867. The dimensions of this church were 30x60 feet, and the 
cost was |6,000. The church grounds consist of two lots and 
ten feet, donated by a Mr. Daly, during Father O' Flaherty's 
time. The church is a brick structure, but in 1875 a frame 
addition was made to the rear of it, during Father Bleckmann's 
pastorate. For a short time this addition was used for a school ; 
the cost of it was about |650. The priest's house was built by 
Father Plaster, at a cost of about $2,400. The debt on the 
church property at the present time is $300. The mission, 
Veedersburg, is attended from Covington on two Sundays of 
the month. 

At the present time the number of families is fifty-one. 
The Rosary Society has fifty-three members. The men of the 
parish belong to Catholic Knights of America, Catholic Fores- 
ters, or Knights of Columbus. 



LEBANON. 

ST. Joseph's church. 
1865, 

This church, in its earliest days, was called St. Charles', 
later St. Joachim's, and since 1901 St. Joseph's Church. It 
was attended as a station, as early as 1862, when priests visited 
here from Lafayette, such as Rev. E. B. Kilroy and others. 
The Catholic population, at that time, was about sixty-five 



306 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

souls. The first church was a building formerly used as a 
residence and then remodeled for a church, in about 1865, by 
Rev. Joseph A. Winter who continued to attend till 1870. 
Rev. John R. Dinnen visited the place, from 1871 till 1874. The 
following were the resident pastors of Lebanon: Rev. Thomas 
M. Cahill, from the beginning of 1874 till May 1875; Rev. John 
Ryan, from May 1875 till December 1878; Rev. L. A. Moench, 
from 1879 till 1882; Rev. John Dempsey, from 1882 till Sep- 
tember 1884; Rev. D. J. Mulcahy, from 1884 till the fall of 
1886; Rev. Michael F. Kelly, from the fall of 1886 till 1893; 
Rev. H. A. Hellhake, from 1893 till August 1898; Rev. W. S. 
Hogan, from August 1898 till 1899; Rev. P. J. Crawley, from 
June 1899 till July 1905; Rev. James Connelly, since July 1, 
1905. 

The first building used for church, bought by Father 
Winters, was located within a half square of the Court House. 
At that time the population was from eighty to ninety souls. 
Father Ryan was the pastor, in 1876, when the present church 
grounds were secured. He sold the old place, and Father 
Crawley, by another sale, reduced the church grounds to their 
present dimensions. The second church was a building for- 
merly occupied by the Christian denomination. It could seat 
200 persons, and was bought by Father Winters for |300. This 
continued to be used for the church until 1901, when the present 
church was erected by Father Crawley. Its furnishings are 
complete in every detail. The seating capacity is about 450, 
and it cost |10,000. 

The first priest's house was a story-and-a-half building, 
bought by Father Dinnen for |200. It was sold with the first 
church property. Father Ryan purchased a house for $300, 
which Father Crawley repaired and improved at a cost of 
$1,500; this being the present priest's house. The church 
property has a debt of $2,000 on it. The number of souls at 
present is 209, or fifty-one families. Two girls of the parish 
have entered the convent. 

St. Joseph's has Altar and Rosary Societies, organized 
1894. They have the care of the altar and the sanctuary; the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, organized in 1896; also a Sodality 
for boys and girls. The altar of the church was donated by 
the Altar and Rosary Societies. 



The Churches, Continued. 307 

ARCOLA. . 

ST. Patrick's church, 
1866. 

Early missionaries paid occasional visits to Areola and 
vicinity; but, in the year 1866, Rev. P. J. Madden held regular 
services in an old school-house. The building of a church was 
inaugurated by him. The Rev. Henry Schaefer next attended 
Areola from Columbia City. The Rev. Theodore Van der Poel 
was Areola's first resident priest, arriving on Christmas eve 
and celebrating Mass, as pastor of Areola, on Christmas day 
1867. The frame church, begun in 1866 by Father Madden, 
was a neat frame structure and completed by Father Van der 
Poel, who also built the present priest's house. The Rev. 
Theodore Wilken came next to Areola and built a fence around 
the church property. Rev. Bartholomew Hartmann succeeded 
Father Wilken in 1880. During his stay of seven years the 
school-house was built. The congregation at this time, num- 
bered about seventy families. Rev. Father Hiekmann came 
next but only remained five or six weeks. Next came Rev. 
J. H. Werdein, continuing his pastorate for about four years; 
then Rev. William J. Quinlan was the pastor for two years, 
till August 20, 1891; and after him Rev. William Conrad 
Miller, who remained for a period of four years, till 1895. 

The pastorate of Rev. Robert Pratt at Areola began June 
29, 1895. It was he who induced the Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ to take charge of the parochial school. It was 
during his pastorate also that a new brick church was built 
in 1898. He also erected the Sisters' residence. Upon Father 
Pratt's transfer to Wabash, January 30, 1900, the Rev. S. M. 
Yenn succeeded him as pastor of St. Patrick's Church, contin- 
uing in that capacity for thirteen months. In March, 1901, 
the Rev. Peter Schmitt was appointed and remained until 
September 13, 1905, when he was succeeded by Rev. Henry 
C. Kappel. The present pastor is Rev. E. J. Mungovan, since 
June 8, 1907. 

St. Patrick's Parish has thirty-four families, numbering 
180 souls. The school is attended by thirty-three pupils and 
is taught by one Poor Handmaid of Jesus Christ. The Societies 



308 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of the parish are: The Rosary Society, for married women, 
with seventeen members; the St. Aloysius' Society, for single 
men, with thirteen members; the Children of Mary, for single 
women, twenty-five members. There is no debt on the church 
property. Pierceton is a mission attended from Areola on the 
second Sunday and Monday of each month. 



REYNOLDS. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1866. 

The country about Reynolds, less probably than a century 
ago, was noted principally for its low lands covered with water, 
sandy ridges appearing here and there, with scant vegetation. 
But in the year 1856 the water had receded sufficiently, for a 
dozen families or more, mostly Irish, to settle in this part of 
the country. It was in this year that Rev. Joseph Stephan, 
residing at San Pierre, began to visit the Reynolds settlement, 
and celebrate Mass in the home of Michael Vogel. 

The first church was erected from 1866 to 1867, at a cost 
of about |975. The Rev. J. A. Winter, assistant priest at St. 
Mary's Church, Lafayette, was in charge of Reynolds, at the 
time the church was building. The ground on which it stands, 
comprising seven and one half acres, was acquired in the year 
1866. The seating capacity of this church was about 150. 
Without much adornment it served its purpose until 1876, 
when the second and present church was erected for about 
|6,000 or |7,000, under the direction of Rev. Dominic Meier, 
O. F. M., who attended Reynolds from Lafayette. The church 
is built in the Roman style of architecture, and is a plain, brick 
building, 64x96 feet, with a seating capacity of 475. 

Several years after the church had been built, a frame 
school-house, 20x40 feet, was erected at a cost of about |475. 
The Sisters of St. Francis were in charge, residing in a small 
frame house built by Rev. John McMahon, opposite the school- 
house, in 1869. The school, however, after a number of years 
was abandoned, and the Sisters left the place. Father McMahon 
moved in the house, vacated by them, but lived in it only a 



The Churches, Continued. 309 

few days, when he departed this Hfe, on May 8, 1872. After 
this until 1899, the pastors of Reynolds occupied the old church 
for their residence. 

Rev. John Kubacki, in the year 1899, built the first and 
present pastoral residence, costing about $2,000. The church 
property is free from all indebtedness. St. Joseph's Church 
has the Rosary Society, a Young Ladies' Sodality, St. Joseph's 
Aid Society and the Poor Souls' Confraternity, since 1905. 
The number of souls in the parish is 282, or fifty-one families. 
One of the girls of this parish has become a Sister of St. Francis. 

The list of priests, having charge of St. Joseph's Church 
at Reynolds, is the following in their chronological order of 
succession: Rev. Joseph Stephan, in 1856; Rev. Joseph A. 
Winter, 1866 and 1867; Rev. John McMahon, from 1867 till 
May 8, 1872, when he died; Rev. Burns; Rev. Anthony King; 
Rev. Anthony Messmann; Rev. Dominic Meier, O. F. M., in 
1876; Rev. Ignatius M. Wilkens, O. F. M.; Rev. John B. Schroe- 
der, O. F. M.; Rev. Augustine Beyer, O. F. M.; Rev. Peter 
Welling, O. F. M.; Rev. Francis S. Schaefer, O. F. M.; Rev. 
Matthias Zumbuelte, from April 1888 to June 1889; Rev. John 
Berg, from June 1889 to June 8, 1893; Rev. George Schramm, 
from June 8, 1893; Rev. John Blum, from December 24, 1895 
to November 1, 1896; Rev. John Kubacki, from November 1, 
1896 to August 6, 1900; Rev. George Horstmann, from August 
6, 1900 to July 4, 1905; Rev. Julius Seimetz, since July 4, 1905. 

The pastor of Reynolds also has charge of the missions, 
Francisville and Medaryville. 



DYER. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1867. 

The priests who had charge of St. Joseph's Church at Dyer 
were the following: Prior to 1867, Rev. M. P. Wehrle, Turkey 
Creek. The following were resident pastors: Rev. Jacob 
Schmitz, from April 1867 till July 1870; Rev. B. Theodore 
Borg, from July 1870 till September 1871; Rev. H. Meissner, 
Crown Point, September till December 1871; Rev. Bernard 



310 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Wiedau, from January till December 1872; Rev. Anthony 
King, from December 1872 till April 1874; Rev. F. J. Freund, 
from May 24, 1874 till August 1875; Rev. Charles Steurer, 
from August 4, 1875 till January 30, 1878; Rev. Joseph Flach, 
from March 5, 1878 till August 3, 1883; Rev. Charles V. Stetter, 
D. D., from August 23, 1883 till July 29, 1888; Rev. Joseph 
Flach, again, since July 29, 1888. 

Prior to 1867, the Catholics of Dyer and vicinity were 
visited by Father Wehrle of Turkey Creek; they were con- 
sidered members of St. John's Congregation, at St. John. The 
first church was a frame building, erected in 1867, by Father 
Schmitz, the first resident pastor of Dyer. The church cost 
from |4,000 to $5,000. The church grounds comprise about 
four acres of land. In 1893, Father Flach improved the church 
by replastering, frescoing, painting the building and putting in 
stained glass windows, and in 1899, giving the church a base- 
ment, with a chapel, all of which was done at a cost of $2,500. 
The church, with its new altars and a pipe organ, was now in 
very good condition; but on December 28, 1902, the entire 
church and contents were destroyed by fire. Father Flach, 
however, went to work and, on July 12, 1903, the corner-stone 
of a new church was laid by Bishop Alerding. The present 
church is a brick and cut stone Gothic structure, 118x43^ feet, 
with a tower 125 feet high. The dedication took place on 
November 26, 1903, the Rev. J. H. Bathe, officiating. The 
entire cost of the church is $18,500. The seating capacity is 
400. 

The parochial school was opened in September 1901. The 
building of which has been improved since, and a house for the 
Sisters erected, for $1,600. Two Franciscan Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart, of Joliet, have charge of the school, teaching 
the usual grades. The attendance at school is eighty-seven. 

The priest's house built in 1869 was moved, remodeled 
and improved, including a new heating apparatus, for $1,700 
in 1905. The church has a debt of $3,675. The number of 
souls is 413, consisting of seventy-five families. Three girls 
of the parish have become Sisters. 

St. Joseph's Parish has the Society of the Holy Childhood, 
since 1880; the Young Ladies' Sodality of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary, since 1880, forty members; the W. C. O. F., since 1898, 



The Churches, Continued. 311 

fifty members; the C. O. F., sijcty-five members, and the 
CathoHc Columbian League, forty members; the Confraternity 
of Christian Mothers, forty-four members; and the Confra- 
ternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. 



KENDALLVILLE. 

CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 
1867. 

Although no specific date can be given, it seems to be the 
opinion, that Rev. Stephen Badin, Rev. Simon Lalumiere, and 
Rev. Alphonse Munschina, visited Kendallville several years 
before the establishment of the diocese of Fort Wayne. Rev. 
Louis Mueller, residing at Fort Wayne, visited Kendallville a 
few times. After him Rev. Julian Benoit came more frequently. 
As a rule, however, the Catholics of these regions attended 
divine services at Avilla, prior to 1865. 

In the year mentioned. Rev. A. B. Oechtering, residing at 
Avilla, began to visit Kendallville regularly, celebrating Mass 
in the house of Peter Ringle. Owing to the construction of 
the Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad, the number of Catholics 
increased, so as to make -the building of a church possible. 
Lots were bought in what is now known as the West Side, and 
in the fall of 1866, Bishop Luers laid the corner-stone of the new- 
church. The erection of this church, however, was abandoned 
when Father Oechtering bought the Baptist church, which was 
offered him for $2,200. This building stood on the corner of 
Oak and Diamond streets. In 1867, Father Oechtering was 
transferred to Mishawaka, and Rev. Dominic Duehmig was 
made his successor at Avilla, having charge also of Kendall- 
ville. Father Duehmig remodeled the Baptist church, the 
Ladies' Altar Society assisting him in the purchase of the 
requisites for the altar and the sanctuary. Two rooms were 
added to the rear of the church, for the accommodation of the 
pastor, when visiting Kendallville. The full dimensions of the 
church, as it now stands, is 40x70 feet. 

Father Duehmig had charge up to 1884, and after him 
Rev. Max Benzinger, residing at Summit, until 1887. From 



312 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

1887 to 1889 Rev. John Hoss visited Kendallville. After that 
date until 1897, it again became a mission attended from 
Avilla. In 1897 Rev. George Lauer was made pastor of Lig- 
onier, with Kendallville for a mission; when, however, Rev. 
John F. Noll was appointed to succeed Father Lauer in 1899, 
he took up his residence in Kendallville, and since that time 
Kendallville has had a resident pastor. Father Noll improved 
the church property and during his stay lived in a rented house. 
His successor, on June 8, 1902, was Rev. John C. Keller. That 
same year a residence was built, containing ten rooms, costing 
|2,500. On September 18, 1905, a church bell was bought. 
The church property has a debt of |1,450. 

The Kendallville Parish has the Altar Society, since 1868, 
and the Young Ladies' Sodality, since 1903, both for the women. 
The Holy Name Society is for the men. The number of souls 
is about 201, constituting forty-eight families. 

Priests attending Kendallville, for whom we can give any 
definite dates, were: Rev. August B. Oechtering, from 1865 
till 1867; Rev. Dominic Duehmig, 1867 till 1884; Rev. Max. 
Benzinger, from Summit, 1884 till 1887; Rev. John Hoss, 1887 
till 1889; Rev. Dominic Duehmig, 1889 till 1897; Rev. George 
Lauer, from Ligonier, 1897 till 1899; Rev. John F. Noll, first 
resident pastor of Kendallville, 1889 till 1902; and since June 
8, 1902, Rev. John C. Keller, second resident pastor. 



WINAMAC. 

ST. Peter's church. 
1867. 

The spiritual needs of Catholics at Winamac and the 
surrounding country, were looked after by priests from Logans- 
port, from 1850 to 1867. Mass in those days was said at the 
residence of M. D. Falvey. The Rev. George A. Hamilton 
erected the first church, a frame structure. Father Hamilton 
at that time resided at Logansport. Rev. Henry Koenig was 
appointed the first resident pastor, in 1867. The name of 
Rev. Charles Kunkel also appears on the baptismal records. 
Rev. Bernard Wiedau was the pastor from 1869 to 1870, and 



The Churches, Continued. 313 

again from December 1872 to 1873. • In 1873, Bishop Dwenger 
gave the Fathers of the Congregation of the Most Precious 
Blood charge of Winamac and the neighboring missions. Rev. 
August Reichert, C. PP. S., was the first of these Fathers sent 
to Winamac, but he remained only a few months when he was 
recalled, and Rev. Theopistus Wittmer, C. PP. S., was sent to 
fill his place. Father Wittmer built a parochial school and 
engaged the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood to have charge 
of it, in 1874. Father Wittmer was recalled in 1876, and Rev. 
Theobald Schoch, C. PP. S., succeeded him. In 1880, Rev. 
Christian Nigsh, C. PP. S., was made the pastor, who in 1883 
erected a brick church, 45x95 feet. Rev. KiHan Schill, C. PP. 
S., was pastor from 1885 till 1887. From 1887 to 1897, it was 
Rev. Otto Missler, C. PP. S., who had charge of the congre- 
gation. Rev. Joseph Uphaus, C. PP. S., was pastor from 1897 
till the fall of 1898. Rev. Leopold Under, C. PP. S., came 
next and remained until 1903, when Rev. Valentine M. Schirack, 
C. PP. S., succeeded him. This Father met with a fatal acci- 
dent, on November 15, 1904, on account of a runaway horse, 
and died almost instantly. Rev. Virgilius Krull, C. PP. S., 
succeeded Father Schirack at Winamac, and remained till the 
end of January 1905, when the present pastor. Rev. Lawrence 
J. Schirack, C. PP. S., was appointed pastor. 

Winamac has ninety Catholic families, with 440 souls. 
The parochial school, with an attendance of seventy-four 
pupils, is conducted by two Sisters of the Precious Blood.' 
The church societies have an aggregate membership of 200. 
There is no debt on the church property. 



I 



CHAPTER XI. 



THE CHURCHES — CONTINUED 

1868-1877 

CROWN POINT — ELKHART — MARION — MONROEVILLE — LOGANS- 
PORT, ST. Joseph's — muncie — lafayette, st. anne's — 
LOWELL — ST. Anthony's — walkerton — fort wayne, 
ST. Peter's — hobart — barrydale — otis — auburn — 
schererville — tipton — fowler — logansport, st. 
Bridget's — remington — dunnington — garrett — port- 
land — south bend, st.hedwig's. 



CROWN POINT. 

ST. mary's church. 
1868. 

From about 1861 till 1865, the Rev. M. P. Wehrle, resident 
pastor at Lottaville (Turkey Creek), paid occasional visits to 
Crown Point. He celebrated Mass at the homes of Anna 
Shehan and Catharine Scherer, and also in the Court House. 
In fact the first pastoral residence served also as the first church. 
The resident pastors at Crown Point were: Rev. M. P. Wehrle, 
from December 31, 1865, till November 26, 1868; Rev. Louis 
Weiser, from November 26, 1868 till January 22, 1871; Rev. 
Henry Meissner, from January 22, 1871 till October 3, 1875; 
Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, from October 3, 1875 till April 17, 
1876; Rev. Aegidius Hennemann, O. S. B., from April 17, 
1876 till October 20, 1878; the name of Rev. Piriminius Lever- 
mann, O. S. B., also appears on the baptismal register from 
February 11, 1878 till May 5th, of the same year; Rev. John 
Ritter, from October 20th, till November 17, 1878; Rev. 
Aemilian Wendel, O. S. B., from November 17, 1878 till July 
23, 1882; Rev. Maurice Kaeder, O. S. B., from July 23, 1882 
till September 30, 1888; Father Wendel again, from September 
30, 1888 till July 1, 1889; Rev. Philip Guethoff, since July 1, 



The Churches, Continued. 315 

1889. The records of the church show 1,054 baptisms and 186 
marriages, up to the present time. The church grounds con- 
sisting of about three acres cost $1,000, and were donated by 
Peter Kahoe in 1866. 

The first church building was a frame structure, 30x60 
feet. It was erected at a cost of |1,500 and was dedicated by 
Bishop Luers on Rosary Sunday in 1868. The present pastoral 
residence was built in 1871 at a cost of |1,500, by Father 
Meissner. Later a kitchen was added at an expenditure of 
|350. The present Sisters' residence was the first school-house; 
a one-story, one room frame structure built in 1872, at a cost 
of |1,000. The first church building, to which one story was 
added at a cost of over $1,000, by Father GuethofF, is the 
present school. It contains two school-rooms on the first floor 
and two on the second. Three of these rooms are used for 
school purposes, the other for society meetings. The Sisters 
of St. Agnes have charge of the school, which is attended by 
103 pupils. 

Father Guethoff built the present church in 1890. It is 
of brick and stone, 50x113 feet, and cost $12,800. The spire 
has a height of 142 feet; the architecture is Romanesque. 
The stained glass windows, the three altars, the pews, the 
pulpit, the organ, etc., necessitated an outlay of $5,000. The 
chapel in the basement, for Mass in winter, cost $600. $400 
was paid for statuary. The frescoing of the church together 
with improvements and repairs in 1907 cost $3,000. The 
seating capacity of the church is 600. Crown Point has a 
Catholic population of 630, or 124 families. There is no debt 
on the church property. 

St. Joseph's Rosary Society, for married men, has twenty- 
three members. St. Mary's Rosary Society, for married women, 
eighty-five. St. Joseph's Sodality, for single men, has fifty- 
seven. St. Mary's Sodality, for single women, has eighty. The 
Infant Jesus Society, for children, has eighty-five. The League 
of the Sacred Heart, has 350 members. 

One arce and a half was bought for cemetery purposes on 
March 13, 1869, for $140. In 1907, Father Guethoff bought 
three and three-quarter acres, additional, for $675. Much has 
been done towards beautifying the cemetery, and a fund is 
being secured for its permanent care. 



316 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

ELKHART. 

ST. Vincent's church. 
1868. 

The first visit of a priest to Elkhart was that of Rev. 
Henry Koenig, pastor at Mishawaka. From May 19, 1867, 
Rev. August B. Oechtering, also resident at Mishawaka, 
attended Elkhart as a station, celebrating Mass in private 
houses. The first church was erected under the supervision 
of Father Oechtering, in 1868. It was a brick building, 28x56 
feet, and cost about $2,500. The number of souls at this time 
was about 100, Irish and German. The church grounds were 
secured, partly in 1867 and partly in 1885; Father Oechtering 
secured the old, and Rev. William Kroeger the new grounds, 
at a total cost of |2,100. The present church was erected in 
1886, Father William Kroeger being pastor at the time. It is 
the Grecian style of architecture, and its dimensions are 130x60 
feet. The cost of the building, including decorations and 
furniture, was |45,000. 

School is taught in the old church and a one-story building. 
The Sisters of the Holy Cross have charge of it, and the usual 
eight grades are being taught. The Sisters reside in the old 
parochial residence, erected in 1872, for $2,000, during the 
pastorate of Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan. This house was improved 
by the Rev. Henry Boeckelmann, in 1902. The priest's house, 
a two-story brick house, was erected in 1899 by Father Boeckel- 
mann, at a cost of $10,000. The church property has no debt 
on it, the balance of indebtedness having been paid off, on July 
22, 1906. 

St. Vincent's Parish has the following societies: The 
Knights of Columbus, ninety members; the Catholic Benev- 
olent Legion; Catholic Lady Foresters; Archconfraternity of 
the Rosary, 118 members; Young Ladies' Sodality, fifty-two 
members; the Guardian Angels' Society. The number of souls 
of the parish is 550. Two boys of the parish have become 
priests and two girls Sisters. 

The priests, who have had charge of Elkhart, either 
visiting it or residing there, were: Rev. August B. Oechtering, 
from 1868 till 1871; Rev. John H. Oechtering, assistant during 



The Churches, Continued. 317 

this time at Mishawaka, also visited Elkhart; Rev. Jeremiah 
Quinlan, from 1871 till 1875; Rev. Martin F. Noll, from 1875 
until 1880; Rev. William Kroeger from 1880 till 1891; Rev. 
Henry A. Boeckelmann from December 1891 till October 4, 
1906; Rev. Francis J. Jansen, since November 1, 1906. The 
assistant priests at Elkhart have been, Rev. John F. Noll, 
from June till December 1898; Rev. Charles F. Keyser, from 
October 11, 1902 till October 1903; Rev. F. X. Labonte from 
April 7, 1905 till October 30, 1906. 

The cemetery of St. Vincent's Parish is located a mile and 
one-half from the church, and comprises five and seven-eighths 
acres of land. 

The school, with an attendance of 142 pupils, is conducted 
by three Sisters of the Holy Cross, teaching the regular eight 
grades. 



MARION. 

ST. Paul's church. 
1868. 



The first Catholic families came to Marion with the con- 
struction of, what is now, the Michigan division of the Big 
Four railroad, in 1855. At that time for a number of years 
the pastors of Peru, Wabash, Kokomo and Union City visited 
here. The list of pastors, from 1868, is the following: Rev. 
B. T. Borg, assistant at Peru, from 1868 till 1870; Rev. P. 
Frawley, first resident pastor, from 1875 till 1876; Rev. M. F. 
Kelly, from 1876 till 1882; Rev. James A. Twigg, from May 
1882 till 1883; Rev. A. J. Strueder, from 1883 till September 
1884; Rev. M. Joy, one month; Rev. John Grogan, from October 
1884 till January 1894; Rev. W. J. Quinlan, from January 4, 
1894 till April 14, 1906; Rev. P. J. Crawley, since April 14, 1906. 

Father Borg, in 1868, built the original portion of the old 
frame church, in which he said Mass for the first time, on the 
second Sunday of July, 1868. The first resident pastor was 
Rev. P. Frawley, who built the priest's house, which, in the 
summer and fall of 1897, was enlarged and refurnished, by 
Father Quinlan, at a cost of over |4,000. 



318 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

The discovery of natural gas much increased the Catholic 
population of Marion; and when Father Quinlan took charge 
of the parish, in 1894, he at once enlarged the old frame church, 
which was ready for occupancy on March 4th, of that year. 
However, it was apparent that the building of a larger and more 
commodious church was a crying necessity. Ground was 
broke, for the present St. Paul's Church, on September 30, 
1895; the corner-stone of it was laid on May 7, 1896, and, on 
November 7, 1897, the new church was solemnly dedicated, 
by Bishop Rademacher, in the presence of a vast concourse of 
people. 

St. Paul's Congregation has about 150 families, numbering 
650 souls. The debt on the church property is |14,500. The 
societies of the parish have an aggregate membership of 219. 
Besides these, there are the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Foresters, the C. L. B. A., the A. O. H., and the C. M. B. A. 



MONROEVILLE. 

ST. ROSE OF Lima's church. 

1868. 

Tradition has it, that in the year 1831, the often men- 
tioned missionary, Father Badin, came to Monroeville, on a 
sick call, to attend a certain French prospector, located there 
temporarily. It is certain, however, that Father Benoit ad- 
ministered to the Catholic people here, about 1840, celebrating 
Mass in the homes of Jerome Jeffroy and others. Father 
Bessonies too called here, about that time. Up to 1868, Mon- 
roeville was a station attended by priests residing at the Cathe- 
dral, in Fort Wayne. The Catholics hereabout numbered some 
twenty families, being French, Irish and German, as to nation- 
ality. 

From 1868 till 1884, Monroeville was a mission regularly 
visited in the order given, by Rev. E. P. Walters, Rev. J. H. 
Brammer, Rev. J. M. Graham, Rev. A. M. Meili, Rev. A. Heit- 
mann, and Rev. T. Hibbelen. In the year 1884, when the 
place was being attended from Areola by Rev. H. T. Wilken, 



The Churches, Continued. 319 

and Rev. B. Hartmann, Monroeville received its first resident 
pastor, in the person of Rev. John Grogan. Rev. John Hoss 
was resident pastor, from 1886 to 1887. 

The five lots owned by the church were bought, partly by 
Father Walters in 1868, and by Father Hartmann in 1886. 
The cemetery, consisting of four acres adjacent to the town, 
^ was bought by Father Wilken, in 1877. The total cost of this 
real estate was about $1,500. When these purchases were 
made, Father Walters resided at Fort Wayne and Fathers 
Hartmann and Wilken at Areola. 

The first church, which was erected in 1868, was a small 
frame structure, and was destroyed by fire in 1887. The 
present church was built in 1888. The architecture is Gothic, 
the dimensions 32x92 feet and the spire 102 feet in height. It 
is a small, but beautiful church, and is a monument to the 
boundless zeal and untiring energy of the saintly Father Hart- 
mann. The seating capacity is 300. In 1904, under the pas- 
torate of the Rev. T. M. Conroy, a steam heating plant was 
provided, the church was being lighted by electricity, which, 
with a few other improvements, cost |2,300, and in 1907 three 
new altars with carpet for the sancturay were provided; all of 
which was paid for, immediately after their installation. The 
parish has no school, for obvious reasons, but the children are 
being taught their catechism four times a week, and church 
history once a week. 

The pastoral residence was erected in 1882 by Father 
Hartmann, and was improved in 1899 by Father Paquet. 
Owing to the purchase of additional real estate, recently made, 
there is at present a debt of $1,760 on the church property. 
The parish has the St. Joseph's Benevolent Society, since 1888; 
among other good works, it buries the poor dead of the parish. 
The Rosary Society has thirty members. The St. Aloysius' 
Society, for the young men, and the Blessed Virgin's Sodality, 
for the young women. The Columbus Club, for young men, 
has twenty-two members. 

In 1892 Father Hartmann was succeeded by Rev, F. Von 
Schwedler, whose successor was Rev. L. R. Paquet, in 1897. 
After him came Rev. F. J. Dandurand, from August 23, 1900 
until July 1904. The present pastor. Rev. T. M. Conroy, has 
had charge since September 21, 1904. 



320 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

LOGANSPORT. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1869. 

St. Joseph's Church is a branch of St. Vincent's Church- 
The first St. Joseph's Church was erected by Rev. Jacob Mayer> 
in 1869. It was a brick building, 80x40 feet, with a seating 
capacity of 600. At the time, the parish consisted of only 
fifty families. The cost of the church was only $4,300, because 
the parishoners did much of the work gratis. The dedication 
took place on February 2, 1870. 

In August 1872, the Rev. Henry Koehne took charge of 
St. Joseph's Congregation. In May 1882, he had paid off a 
debt of $6,000, and had accummulated a fund of $2,000 for a 
new church. The corner-stone of the new church was laid in 
July 1885, in December the building was under roof, and, on 
Sunday, October 23, 1887, the church was dedicated by Bishop 
Dwenger, assisted by Bishop Rademacher, of Nashville. The 
new and present church is 165 feet long and 65 feet wide. The 
elevation of the spire is 161 feet, surmounted by a cross, 12 
feet high. The style of architecture is Romanesque. Above 
the entrance is a gallery capable of seating 200 children, and 
immediately over this, is a smaller gallery for the organ and 
choir. The width of the center aisle is six feet, and of the two 
side aisles five feet. The furniture of the church is all black 
and white walnut, beautifully oiled. The church will seat 
1,000 persons, leaving a vacant space for pews to accommodate 
200 more. The fresco painting of the church is chaste, artistic 
and suggestive. The ten stained glass windows present scenes 
from the life of our Saviour, the Blessed Virign and the Saints. 
The total cost of the building amounts to $80,000. 

During the absence of Father Koehne in Europe, in 1888, 
three large bells were placed in the tower, at a cost of $1,250. 
In 1894, the church was again frescoed, and the artist, Zuko- 
tinski, executed four handsome oil paintings; the Archangel 
Michael over the Main Altar and the Archangel Gabriel, the 
Holy Family and the death of St. Joseph over the Side Altars. 
These paintings cost $500 each. 

New altars, in the byzantine style, were placed in 1894. 
They are in imitation of white marble, richly ornamented with 



The Churches, Continued. 321 

gold. The Main Altar has the statues of St. Joseph, St. Aloy- 
sius and St. Theresa; one Side Altar the statues of the Sacred 
Heart of Jesus and two angels, the other Side Altar the statues 
of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, St. Cecilia and St. Barbara. 
The cost was |3,000. A little later, fine oil paintings of the 
fourteen stations of the Cross were procured, for 1 1,400. Christ- 
mas of 1900 was distinguished with a new imported crib, 
worth |400. All the furniture and furnishings, and all needed 
articles for the sanctuary, including sacred vessels and vest- 
ments, have been procured and are in every respect first class. 

From the time Father Koehne took charge of the parish, 
the Cullen House was used as a school, from 1872 to 1892. 
The number of pupils increased to such an extent, that larger 
accommodations became a necessity. On the first day of 
April, 1891, the old church was torn down, and in its place a 
new school erected, and dedicated on January 17, 1892. This 
building is in every respect commendable. It is three-stories 
in height, with a basement. The first floor has two class- 
rooms, with a capacity each of seventy-five, on the same floor 
is a room for society meetings. The second floor has four 
class-rooms and two music rooms. The third floor is a hall, a 
perfect model of its kind, with a seating capacity of 600. The 
dimensions of the stage are 26x20 feet. The school was con- 
ducted by lay-teachers from 1872 to 1877. In August of 1877, 
Father Koenhe secured the School Sisters of Notre Dame for 
his schools. At the present time eight Sisters have charge of 
290 children. The old school building has been remodeled 
and serves now as the Sisters' dwelling. 

Father Koehne, up to the time of his death, occupied the 
residence on the corner of Market and Second streets. In 
1904 he purchased a residence adjacent to, and west of the 
church, for a priest's residence, at a cost of |9,000, from his 
own personal means, and donated the same to St. Joseph's 
Church. The debt on the church property is |2,555. 

The following are the societies: The Rosary Society, 
since 1869, with 100 members; St. Aloysius Young Men's 
Society, since 1883, with ninety members; the Young Ladies' 
Sodality of the Immaculate Conception, since 1872, with 140 
members; the Sacred Heart Sodality, since 1899, with 125 
members; the St. Joseph's Benevolent Society, since 1872, 



322 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

with 160 members. The number of famiHes is 250, numbering 
about 1,150 souls. Two boys have become priests and eight 
girls Sisters. 

The pastors of St. Joseph's were: Rev. Jacob Mayer, 
from 1869 to 1872; Rev. Bernard Wiedau, Rev. F. Von Schwed- 
ler, and Rev. A. M. Meili, had charge temporarily. Rev. 
Henry Koehne, from August 1872 to November 24, 1906; 
Rev. Anthony J. H. Kroeger, since January 1, 1907. 

From 1903 to 1905, Fathers of the Most Precious Blood 
were assistants at St. Joseph's Church, but since May 1905 it 
was Rev. William Hoff, till July 13, 1907, when Rev. Henry 
Hoerstman was appointed. 



MUNCIE. 

ST. Lawrence's church. 

1869. 

Muncie, the county seat of Delaware county, is situated 
on the south bank of the White river, about fifty-three miles 
northeast of IndianapoHs. It is opposite the site of the old 
Indian town which was north of the White river, deriving its 
name from a tribe of Indians, known as the Muncies, who were 
a division of the Delaware tribe. It was here the Shawnee 
Prophet, Tecumseh's brother, resided. 

Missionaries, in the earliest days, occassionally visited 
the few Catholics scattered here and there. The first priest 
visiting Muncie was Rev. Daniel Maloney, who came from 
Indianapolis. The first Mass was celebrated at the house of 
Patrick Tuhey, on the site of the present public library. For 
nearly four years Father Maloney paid monthly visits, cele- 
brating Mass alternately at the homes of Patrick Tuhey and 
Peter Mutch. Patrick Tuhey is no more, but Peter Mutch 
and his wife, both nearly ninety years of age, still occupy the 
old home of the early missionary days. Father Maloney had 
to make his journey from Indianapolis on horseback. 

Rev. August Bessonies attended Muncie, from Indianap- 
olis, in 1855 and 1856. Rev. Michael Clark came to Muncie, 
in 1857. He also attended the missions of Winchester, Ander- 



The Churches, Continued. 323 

son and Union City. His efforts to build a church in Muncie 
were not successful. Missionary visits continued, for short 
periods of time, by Revs. Simon Siegrist, and Theodore Van der 
Poel, John McMahon, John Gueguen, Daniel Maloney and 
William Doyle. Rev. FitzMaurice took charge in the early 
sixties and ministered to the spiritual wants for three years. 
Revs. John Bleckmann and Frederick Von Schwedler both 
attended Muncie from Union City. The Rev. Lawrence 
Lamoor, of Union City, began the building of the church in 
1869. The congregation at that time numbered seventy-five 
members, none of them rich, but what they lacked in wealth, 
they supplied in zeal and perseverance. Lots were bought on 
the corner of Charles and Hackley streets, upon which the 
church was built. It was a brick building, 35x60 feet in size. 
St. Lawrence, the deacon, was named the patron of the church. 
It was dedicated in 1873 by Bishop Dwenger. Rev. Joseph A. 
Marshall had charge of Muncie, from June to September 1873. 
Rev. John B. Crawley, of Anderson, succeeded Father Marshall 
from September 1873 till December 1874. He attended 
Muncie once a month, and paid off all but |250 of the indebt- 
edness of the church. 

The present pastor, the Rev. William George Schmidt, 
was appointed pastor of Muncie on January 28, 1875. At 
that time the congregation had about forty-five families. He 
erected a small frame residence, which served as a priest's 
house until 1899, when he built the present rectory, at a cost 
of about |7,000. The first pastoral residence was partially 
destroyed by fire, on November 1, 1880. Father Schmidt 
built a frame school-house in 1881, wherein he himself taught, 
from 1881 to 1882. He attended Hartford City in 1875, and 
Montpelier from 1875 to 1896. Sick calls to Hartford City, 
Montpelier, and the surrounding country, were made by such 
modes of travel as horseback, handcars, and other primitive 
conveniences. 

The present church edifice, planned in the Gothic style of 
architecture and cruciform in shape, was built by Father 
Schmidt and dedicated by Bishop Rademacher, on the feast 
of the Nativity of our Lady, 1895. The altars and furniture 
are of oak. The cost of the church was |43,000. It has a 
seating capacity of 950. After the new church was built, the 



324 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

old church was converted into two school-rooms, which, with 
the frame structure erected in 1881, served for the accommoda- 
tion of the children until 1901, in the spring of which year 
Father Schmidt began the erection of the present school. The 
work progressed throughout the spring and summer of 1901, 
and in October of that year, two rooms were ready for occu- 
pancv. These rooms accommodated those children, who had 
formerly attended in the "Old Church" school-rooms, which 
latter Father Schmidt tore down, at this period. He rented, 
for the first four to six weeks of the fall term, two rooms in a 
neighboring building, formerly used as a blacksmith shop, 
and many of the children now attending school laughingly 
recall their school days in the "Blacksmith Shop." The other 
rooms of the new school were ready for their purpose by Decem- 
ber, 1901. The building contains eight well lighted, thoroughly 
ventilated, and finely equipped school-rooms, each 27x27 feet. 
Two spacious halls separate the rooms on each of the two 
floors. A large hall occupies the third floor. The heating and 
other conveniences are of the modern type. The cost of the 
building is about §20,000. The indebtedness on the church 
property is 817,000. 

The school was first taught by the pastor, later by a lay- 
teacher, then by the Sisters of St. Joseph, and since 1886 by 
the Sisters of St. Agnes, from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Eight 
Sisters are engaged in teaching the 403 children, who attend 
the school. The eight grades are followed by a modification 
of the ordinary high school and commercial college. The 
Sisters reside in a frame building near the school-house. Father 
Schmidt contemplates the erection of a more spacious residence 
for them, in the near future. 

The parish has the St. Vincent de Paul's Aid Society, estab- 
lished in 1894; the A. O. H., in 1892; the Ladies' Auxiliary of 
the .\. O. H., in 1898; the Catholic Benevolent Legion; the 
Ladies' Catholic Benevolent Association; and the Knights of 
Columbus. For the girls there is the St. Agnes' Sodality and 
the Children of Mary; for the boys, the Holy Name Sodality 
and the St. Aloysius' Society. The Sodality of the Blessed 
Virgin Mary is for single women; the Guardian Angel and Infant 
Jesus Societies are for the children. St. Lawrence's Congrega- 
tion has 329 families, numbering 1,697 souls. 



The Churches, Continued. 325 

The Rev. John Schmitz was^the assistant from 1899 till 
1900; later the Rev. L. R. Paquet and after him the Rev. 
Z. Huot. 



LAFAYETTE. 

ST. Ann's church. 
1870. 



In 1870, Rev. George A. Hamilton built St. Ann's Chapel 
on the corner of Wabash avenue and Smith street, in Lafayette, 
at a cost of |5,000. This chapel was a two-story, brick building 
arranged for church and school purposes, and services were 
held here, every Sunday, by one of the priests of St. Mary's 
Church. On the advice of Father Walters, St. Ann's was made 
an independent parish by Bishop Dwenger, in September 1884. 
Rev. John Dempsey was appointed its first pastor, who at 
once built a pastoral residence. He was removed to Valpar- 
aiso, August 24, 1888. 

Father Dempsey's immediate successor, was the Rev. 
Patrick F. Roche. Father Roche, recognizing the necessity 
of a new church began the work on the present St. Ann's 
Church in May 1896. On September 12, 1897, Bishop Rade- 
macher laid the corner-stone with elaborate ceremonies, and 
in the presence of at least 3,000 people. The church is a hand- 
some structure, built of brick and stone, 143x53 feet. The 
cost of the building, including the furnishings, amounted to 
$20,000. The furniture of the church, altars, pews, railing, 
organ, the vestments and sacred vessels cost, in the aggregate, 
about |8,000. The seating capacity is 640, and 200 in the 
gallery, total of 840. The old church is being used for school 
purposes. The dimensions of the building are 145.x44 feet. 
It is divided into three school-rooms and can accommodate 
180 pupils. The eight grades are taught, and the Sisters of 
Providence have had charge, from the beginning; they reside 
in a rented house. At the present time, three Sisters have 
charge of 143 children. There is a debt of |5,100 on the church 
property. 

St. Ann's has a Living Rosary Society, for married men 
and women, since 1892, seventy-four members; the St. Ann's 



326 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Cadets, for single men, since 1897, forty-three members; the 
Young Ladies' SodaHty, since 1890, ninety-five members; the 
Children of Mary, since 1902, sixty-two members; the Holy 
Angels' Society, eighty members, and the Sacred Heart League, 
with forty-eight members. The C. B. L., the C. K. of A., the 
A. O. H., and the Ladies' Auxiliary A. O. H., have an aggregate 
membership of 207. 

St. Ann's has had two resident pastors: Rev. John 
Dempsey, from September 1884 till August 1888; Rev. Patrick 
F. Roche, from August 24, 1888 till May 16, 1901. The present 
pastor. Rev. Michael F. Byrne, has had charge since May 16, 
1901. 

The Indiana State Soldiers' Home, near Lafayette, has 
in it a chapel for the accommodation of the Catholic inmates, 
since 1896. Rev. P. F. Roche was instrumental in securing 
these accommodations, consisting of one large room in the 
rear of one of the main buildings, at the Home; it is fully 
furnished with altar, vestments and other requisites, as well 
as pews. Services are held there, by the pastor of St. Ann's, 
on week days only, with an average attendance of about twenty- 
five. 

Rev. John Blum was assistant at St. Ann's, from July 
till December 28, 1905. The number of souls in St. Ann's 
parish is 1,120, constituting 250 families. Four boys and eight 
girls have entered the religious state of life. 



LOWELL. 
ST. Edward's church. 

1870. • 

The few Catholic families, living at Lowell, were visited 
by the Rev. Francis X. Deimel, pastor of Crown Point. He 
celebrated Mass in the home of John Driscoll, at regular inter- 
vals. It was not long, however, when, upon a visit of Bishop 
Luers, a site was selected for a church and arrangements made 
for its erection. The Bishop himself gave a donation of |100. 
Under the direction of Father Deimel, and a building com- 
mittee, a small structure of frame was built, at a cost of about 
|500, and was dedicated by Bishop Luers in 1870. 



The Churches, Continued. 327 

In 1878, Lowell became a mission attached to Klaasville. 
The Rev. John H. Bathe, pastor of Klaasville, attending it 
until 1882. Father Bathe secured a site for a cemetery at a 
cost of |250. The Rev. Charles A. Ganzer succeeded Father 
Bathe, remaining till 1891, when he was transferred to Kentland. 
For a short time, the Rev. Adam Buchheit attended Lowell 
from Klaasville. From 1891 till 1898, Lowell was attended 
by the Fathers of the Most Precious Blood near Rensselaer. 
The Rev. F. X. Schalk, C. PP. S., built the present edifice at 
a cost of $5,000. The building was dedicated by Bishop 
Rademacher, in 1897. 

In September 1898, Lowell received its first resident pastor 
in the person of Rev. Frederick Koenig, with Wheatfield and 
Kniman as missions. Father Koenig at once built the priest's 
house, costing about |2,500. In November, 1905, Father 
Koenig was transferred to Lottaville, and was succeeded by 
the Rev. Charles F. Keyser. Since June 8, 1907, Lowell is 
attended from St. Joseph's College, by Rev. Alphonse Mueller, 
C. PP. S. On the day of the dedication of the new church, 
the building was free from all indebtedness and the congrega- 
tion today has no liabilities. 

The congregation has 31 families, numbering 112 souls. 
The Rosary Society, for married women, has twenty-three 
members; the St. Aloysius' Society, for single men, has twelve, 
and the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, for single women, has 
twenty members. 



BENTON COUNTY. 

ST. Anthony's church. 

1870. 

The earliest visits of a missionary, in these parts, go back 
to 1862. St. Anthony's was attended, as a station, by Rev. 
Joseph Stephan from Rensselaer, from 1863 to 1864. For a 
period of five or six years Mass was celebrated, four or five 
times a year, in the house of Anthony Dehner. The early 
Catholic settlers were Germans. 

While residing in Kentland, Rev. A. Messmann had charge 



328 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of St. Anthony's, where, on April 24, 1869, he organized the 
nineteen famihes into a parish, began the building of a church 
and finished the same in 1870. It is the present church. The 
church grounds are composed of ten acres of land. In 1869, 
Anthony Dehner donated five acres for church and cemetery 
and, in 1876, Bernard Quante donated five acres for priest's 
house and pasture. The dimensions of the church are 54x60 
feet. In 1894, Rev. J. Baker made extensive repairs, by hning 
the ceiling and replastering the church, at a cost of $250 and, 
in 1898 and 1899, Rev. F. J. Bilstein added a sacristy and had 
the church frescoed, at a cost of $2,023. $1,500 of this amount 
was secured by three funded Masses. The seating capacity of 
the church is 240. 

The priest's house was built in 1876, by Rev. F. X. Ege. 
It was a one-and-a-half story house to which, in 1884, a kitchen 
and dining room were added by the Rev. F. J. Lambert. A 
barn was built by Rev. J. Hoss, in about 1880 or 1881. It 
was struck by lightning and burned. Another stable was 
built at once, this too was destroyed by fire in 1899. The 
third stable and barn combined were built by Father Bilstein, 
for $300. The church property is free of debt. The number 
of souls is 157, or twenty-five families. In 1885, a large num- 
ber of French Catholics began to come here, so that the parish 
increased to ninety families, but within ten years the French 
Catholics left the place. One girl of the parish has entered a 
religious community. The parish has the Rosary Society, 
since 1892, and the Sacred Heart Society, since 1901. They 
have charge of the altar and sanctuary. 

The priests who have been the pastors of St. Anthony's 
were: Rev. Joseph Stephan, when a station; Rev. A. Mess- 
mann, of Kentland, from 1870 to 1876, when a mission. The 
following were the resident pastors: Rev. F. X. Ege from 
July 1876 to October 1878; Rev. John Hoss, from October 
1878 till June 1884; Rev. F. J. Lambert, from June 1884 till 
May 1888; Rev. A. J. Strueder, from May 1888 till August 
1891; Rev. Joachim Baker, from August 1891 till January 9, 
1896; Rev. F. Von Schwedler, from January 9, 1896 till Febru- 
ary 16, 1898; Rev. F. J. Bilstein, from February 16, 1898 till 
October 1, 1900; Rev. G. A. Zern, from October 1, 1900 till 
October 2, 1903; Rev. F. J. Koch, since October 2, 1903. 



The Churches, Continued. 329 

WALKERTON. 

ST. Patrick's church. 
1870. 

Walkerton derived its name from a Mr. Walker, who con- 
structed the Lake Erie railroad from Walkerton to Michigan 
City. Prior to that time it was known as East Troy, West 
Troy and West York. About 1856, the Rev. Paul Gillen and 
Rev. John Curley, Fathers of the Holy Cross, residing at Notre 
Dame, said Mass in an old log cabin on Kyram Devery's farm. 
In 1870, Rev. Timothy D. O'Sullivan, residing at Laporte, 
paid occasional visits to Walkerton. The number of souls at 
that time was about forty, mostly Irish. Father O'Sullivan 
built the church, a frame structure 45x22 feet, costing about 
|800. "The pews had no backs to them, and the window 
sills served for lamp stands." Most of the money was collected 
along the railroad line. Rev. M. E. Campion, also residing at 
Laporte, succeeded Father O'Sullivan. The church at that 
time was called St. Henry's Church. In October 1881, the 
Rev. H. F. Joseph Kroll, pastor at Chesterton, took charge of 
Walkerton. From September 1, 1895 to February 4, 1897 
Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S., residing at Wanatah, was 
visiting pastor. Next came Rev. Edward Jakob, C. PP. S., 
till September 1, 1897; Rev. Raymund Vernimont, C. PP. S., 
till January 18, 1898, both residing at Wanatah. Rev. Adam 
M. Buchheit, residing at Wanatah, attended the place till Sep- 
tember 10, 1899. 

The first resident pastor was the Rev. Henry C. Kappel, 
from September 10, 1899 to July 18, 1901. He bought the 
house, adjacent to the church, for a pastoral residence. Father 
Kappel was succeeded by Rev. Peter Budnik, from July 18, 
1901 to June 5, 1902. Since this latter date, the present 
pastor. Rev. Joseph Abel, has had charge. 

The church grounds consist of two lots. In 1886, Father 
Kroll built a gallery in the church, and procured an organ; 
and in 1889 he built an addition of 25x45 feet to the church. 
Father Shunk, in 1895, erected a belfry and put in it a bell, 
and in 1896 gave the church stained glass windows. Father 
Abel, since his arrival, has made several improvements and 



330 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

many repairs. The seating capacity of the church is about 
150. The priest's house owes its present, neat appearance to 
Father Abel. The church property is out of debt. St. Patrick's 
parish has two societies: The Rosary Society, organized in 
1899, and the Sacred Heart Society, in June 1902. The num- 
ber of souls at the present time is eighty-one, or twenty-four 
families. 

The pastor at Walkerton has charge also of the missions 
Hamlet and Bremen, and the station Knox. 



FORT WAYNE. 

ST. Peter's church. 

1S71. 

St. Peter's church property, known as St. Peter's Square, 
is bounded on the north by St. Martin's street, on the east by 
Hanna street, on the south by Dewald street, and on the west 
by Warsaw street; it measures 150x450 feet. Three of the lots 
were purchased in 1871, one of the lots was donated by Father 
Wemhoff, and five lots were purchased about the same time; 
total cost $6,000. The first building erected was a two-story 
brick structure, 40x70 feet. The first floor served as school, 
accommodating comfortably 250 pupils, and the second, as 
church, with a seating capacity of 300. The total cost was 
about $10,000. Rev. John Wemhofif was the pastor at the 
time. 

The present church was built during the pastorate of Rev. 
A. Messmann, in 1892 and 1893. Its dimensions are 190x80 
feet and its cost was $65,000. It is a Gothic structure of 
pleasing design. The present pastor. Rev. Charles Thiele, is 
furnishing the church with a beautiful altar, Stations of the 
Cross and a pulpit. When completed the church with the 
furnishings will represent an outlay of $75,000. The debt on 
the church property is $22,000. 

During the pastorate of Rev. Ferdinand Koerdt, in 1905, 
a new school building was planned, which, when completed, 
will be one of the most imposing and best equipped school- 
houses in Fort Wayne, and will have cost fully $60,000. One 
wing only of the new building is now standing at an expense 
of $18,000, furnishing accommodations for 200 children. The 



The Churches, Continued. 331 

present pastor, Father Thiele, has installed a central heating 
plant, to serve all the buildings on the premises, at a cost of 
111,000. 

Up to 1881 lay-teachers taught the children, but in that 
year the School Sisters of Notre Dame took charge of the school. 
Eight Sisters are engaged in teaching the eight grades, and 
one in the higher branches. The school has an attendance of 
446 pupils. The Sisters reside in a home, specially erected 
for them, in 1880 by Father Messmann, a commodious two- 
story brick structure, 30x65 feet, costing about $3,000. The 
school is supported by the St. Joseph's School Society, which 
was organized in the very beginning, and to which all heads of 
families belong. It may be mentioned that the members of 
this society are either active, or passive, or honorary members. 
The active members are the heads of families, who send children 
to school. They pay eight dollars initiation (in installments, 
if preferred) and seventy-five cents per month, no matter how 
many children they send. The passive members are heads of 
families, who have as yet no children old enough to attend 
school. They pay twenty-five cents per month, until their 
children go to school; the amount having been paid in by that 
time is accepted in payment of the initiation fee as part or 
whole payment of the same as the case may be. The honorary 
members are the heads of families who have no children to 
send to school; they pay twenty-five cents per month. Any 
single person may become an honorary member. 

The first priest's house, built in 1872, was a frame building, 
20x30 feet, with an addition of 8x12 feet. It was removed 
and is at present number 2007, on Hanna street. The present 
priest's house was formerly located where the church now 
stands. It is a frame building and was moved to its present 
location in 1892. It was twice enlarged, at considerable 
expense, and its value is about $3,000. 

Besides the School Society, with 170 members, the parish 
also has the following: St. Martin's Benevolent Society, with 
eighty-eight members, organized in 1874, assists its members 
in time of sickness and death; St. Stephen's Society for young 
men, with eighty-five members; St. Agnes' Society for young 
women, with 145 members, and the Guardian Angel's Society, 
for children, with 125 members, have been in existence since 



332 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the organization of the parish. The Rosary Society is the oldest 
society, for married women. The Christian Mothers' Society 
has a membership of 312. These societies have been most 
helpful in contributing towards the church furnishings. To 
mention one item, they have contributed |5,000 for a new 
altar. Still other Societies are: The CathoHc Knights of 
America, with fourteen members, the Catholic Benevolent 
Legion, seventeen members, the Catholic Benevolent League, 
eighty-nine members, the St. Vincent de Paul's Society, ninety- 
six members, the Association of the Holy Family, 177 members, 
the Poor Souls' Society, ninety-five members, the Association 
of the Holy Childhood, 379 members, the Sacred Heart League, 
555 members. All these societies are in flourishing condition. 

The parish has 384 families. The number of souls is 
1,872. Four boys have become priests, and six girls Sisters. 

The assistant priests at St. Peter's Church were: Rev. 
John Biedermann from October 1, 1901 to June 30, 1905; and 
Rev. Norbert Felden the present assistant. 



HOBART. 

ST. Bridget's church. 

1873. 

Although it is known that missionaries visited these parts 
at an early date, still the name of Rev. Paul Gillen, C. S. C, 
is the first, of whom we have any record, in 1855. He resided 
at Michigan City. He celebrated Mass in the house of John 
Mellane, near Hobart. After Father Gillen came Rev. John 
Force, residing at Valparaiso, from 1858 to 1859. He said 
Mass in the same house. The Rev. Alexius Botti, residing at 
Valparaiso, came next. He celebrated Mass in John Ormand's 
home. It was in the year 1871, that Rev. M. O'Reilly began 
to visit Hobart from Valparaiso, his place of residence. Until 
1873 he celebrated Mass in the home of John O'Doyle, when 
he bought some lots on which to build a church. These three 
lots had an old picture gallery on it, which was converted into 
a church; a building sixty years old, and in use today. $1,100 
was paid for the property, at the time; of this amount Father 
O'Reilly paid over $700 and his successor. Rev. F. X. Baum- 
gartner, the rest. The number of souls at this time was about 



The Churches, Continued. 333 

100. The succession of priests attending Hobart, was the 
following: Rev. Paul Gillen, C. *S. C, Michigan City, from 
1855 to 1858; Rev. John Force, Valparaiso, from 1858 to 1859 
Rev. Alexius Botti, Valparaiso, from 1859 to 1871, Rev 
Michael O'Reilly, Valparaiso, from 1871 to October 18, 1875 
Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, Turkey Creek, from 1875 to 1881 
Rev. H. M. Roth, Turkey Creek, from 1881 to May, 1883 
Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, Turkey Creek, from 1883 to Feb- 
ruary 1885; Rev. Joseph Flach, Turkey Creek, from February 
1885 to July 1888; Rev. Charles V. Stetter, D. D., Turkey 
Creek, from July 1888 to February 27, 1903; Rev. Thomas F. 
Jansen, Hobart, February 27, 1903, who was and is the first 
resident pastor at Hobart, and who attended Turkey Creek, 
as a mission, until October, 1904. 

The old church was much improved and beautified by 
Father Stetter, the interior is nicely frescoed with eight hand- 
some paintings and has three beautiful altars. Father Jansen, 
during his pastorate, has also spent over $1,000 in repairing, 
improving and still further beautifying the church. Besides 
this. Father Jansen has bought the present priest's house, 
together with over an acre of land, for a consideration of $6,200. 
The purchase was made in August 1903, and an additional 
sum of $500 was spent on the house. The church property 
has a debt of $2,700. The number of souls is about 260, con- 
sisting of fifty-two families. 

St. Bridget's Church has the St. Ann's Christian Mothers 
Sodality; the Young Ladies' Sodality, organized in 1906; and 
the Children of Mary. A Society for married and single men 
is now in process of organization. 

The debt on the church property, at the present time, is 
$2,650. Lake Station is a small mission attended by the pastor 
of Hobart. 



BARRYDALE. 

ST. Bridget's church. 

1873. 



Barrydale, formerly known as the "Ditch," was so termed 
on account of a big open ditch a mile or so from the church, 
which served to drain the low, swampy country. In the 



334 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

autumn of 1901, it was named Barrydale. St. Bridget's 
Church was attended by priests from Lafayette; Rev. F. Joseph 
Stephan, about the year 1860, celebrated Mass in private 
houses from time to time. The same can be said of Rev. 
E. B. Kilroy in 1862, and of Rev. C. J. O'Callaghan, in 1864. 
In the year 1870, the Rev. John R. Dinnen, residing at Oxford, 
began to pay St. Bridget's regular visits. At this time the 
Cathohc population did not exceed a dozen families. 

The first little frame church was built, in 1873, at a cost 
of |800, by Rev. Meinrad McCarthy, O. S. B. This building 
still stands and is now used for a hall. Father Dinnen, of 
Oxford, had charge of the mission until 1875, and Rev. Thomas 
M. Cahill, until 1878. Father Cahill was succeeded by the 
Rev. John Dempsey, who for a short time lived in a farm house 
near by, then moved to Fowler and attended the mission from 
there, till 1882, when again it was visited from Oxford, by the 
Rev. P J. Crosson, till 1894. The number of families had now 
increased to about thirty-five. The church grounds comprise 
about two acres. One acre was secured for |50 in 1873 by the 
Benedictine Father McCarthy; and the rest, by the present 
pastor, also for a consideration of |50, being less than half 
its actual value. The parish never had a cemetery of its own, 
its dead being buried in Lafayette or Oxford. Nor has there 
been ever a Catholic school in the place, owing to the long 
distance the children would have to come. The present church 
was built, in 1896, by the Rev. W. Conrad Miller residing at 
Oxford, at a cost of about $7,000. It is a handsome and sub- 
stantial brick structure with a seating capacity of about 325. 
The congregation has forty-three families, numbering 245 souls. 

The present and only priest's house, the place has had, 
was built in the summer of 1901 by the Rev. Charles E. McCabe, 
the first resident pastor, at an outlay of about |3,500. It is 
a fine frame structure of ten rooms, with all modern conven- 
iences, and complete in every detail. The church property 
has a debt of $2,600. 

The Societies, organized in the summer of 1901, were: 
The Rosary Society for married men and women, with thirty 
members; the Sodality of the Children of Mary for young 
women and girls, with eighteen members, and the Sodality of 
the Holy Name for young men and boys, with twenty members. 



The Churches, Continued. 335 

Aside from the spiritual purposes^ for which these organiza- 
tions were called into existence, the same are also helpful in a 
material way, by furnishing the church and sanctuary with 
many necessary and useful articles. 

The present pastor, the Rev. Michael J. Ford, was ap- 
pointed on July 22, 1906. He has secured additional ground, 
has beautified the place, and has made several necessary im- 
provements. 

The pastor at Barrydale visits the mission, at Otterbein, 
every Sunday and Holyday, from Easter to Christmas, and 
every other Sunday from Christmas to Easter. 



OTIS. 

ST. Mary's church. 
1873. 

The Rev. John H. Oechtering was the first priest to visit 
Otis, or Salem Crossing, as it was then known, and the neigh- 
boring country. The Catholic population, in the year 1870, 
consisted of about forty-five Polish and two or three German 
famihes. Father Oechtering, who was the resident pastor at 
Laporte for ten years, built the first church at Otis in 1873 and 
secured the services of the Rev. Francis X. Szulak, S. J., of 
Chicago several times a year to give the Polish families an 
opportunity of receiving the sacraments. Shortly after, the 
Rev. Peter Koncz began to reside at Otis, and became its first 
resident pastor, making his home with private families. His 
successor was Rev. Ludwig Machdzicki, who built the first 
priest's house and remained till 1881. In August, 1881, the 
Rev. Urban Raszkiewicz was appointed pastor at Otis, where 
he continues to live and labor at the present time, the venerable 
pastor of St. Mary's Church, in the eighty-fourth year of his 
age. 

The church property contains five acres of land, part of 
which is used for cemetery purposes. The present pastor has 
made additions to, and improvements on both the church and 
the priest's residence. The church is neatly furnished, cruci- 
form, frame building, and can seat 400 people. It has a chime 
of three bells, in a belfry beside the church. The school was 



336 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

built by Father Machdzicki, in 1880; it is a two-story frame 
building with basement, and has two class-rooms, and private 
rooms for the Sisters and boarders; it cost |2,000. The average 
attendance at school is seventy pupils. Two Felician Sisters, 
from the Mother-house at Detroit, Michigan, teach Enghsh 
and Polish branches. The priest's house with additions and 
improvements has cost about $3,000. There is no debt on 
the church property. 

The parish has three Societies, two are sodalities and one 
is beneficiary. St. Mary's Congregation has given the church 
two priests and four Sisters. Otis has 1 10 families, comprising 
500 souls. Unable to attend to his pastoral duties, on account 
of old age, Father Raszkiewicz received Rev. P. A. Budnik for 
his assistant, on June 8, 1907. 



AUBURN. 

CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

1874. 

Rev. August Young visited Auburn, for the first time, on 
August 5, 1872, finding eight Catholic families in that place. 
For two years he had services in the house of E. Ashley, on 
West Seventh street. The foundation for the present church 
was laid on June 1, 1874, on the corner of Fourth and Railroad 
streets, and the church was dedicated by Bishop Dwenger on 
October 18th, of the same year. The building cost |3,000, and 
the total amount was paid on the day after the dedication. 
The present priest's residence adjoining the church, was bought 
for 1 1,900, on April 15, 1874. The congregation at that time 
numbered 300 souls, and had no debt on the church property. 
By order of the Bishop, Father Young changed his place of 
residence from Auburn to Garrett, on November 10, 1886, but 
continued to visit Auburn from Garrett, until November 1, 
1891. 

The resident pastors succeeding Father Young at Auburn 
were the following: Rev. Rudolph Denk, eight months; Rev. 
Francis P. Faust, from June 1892 till November 1895; Rev. 
Edward J. Boccard, from November 1895 till September 1898; 
Rev. Frederick J. Dandurand, from September 1898 to July 
1900; Rev. John M. Schmitz, since July 13, 1900. 



The Churches, Continued. 337 

On August 30, 1881, four and ajialf acres of ground, known 
as Mader's addition to the town of Auburn, were bought for 
$543.54, and have since been St. Mary's Cemetery, serving 
Auburn, Garrett, and missions for burial purposes, up to 1897. 
Since his accession, the present pastor. Father Schmitz, has 
done much toward improving the church property. The 
Rosary Society for married women, with twenty-four members, 
a SodaUty for single women, with twenty-three members, 
proved beneficial to the parish in many respects. At present, 
Auburn has forty Catholic families, numbering 161 souls. 
The debt on the church property is $160. 



SCHERERVILLE. 

ST. Michael's church. 
1874. 

The pastors of St. Michael's Church were: Rev. Henry 
Meissner, Crown Point, from 1874 till September 1875; Rev. 
Godfrey Kueng, from 1875 till October 1876; a vacancy, from 
October 1876 till February 1877; Rev. John Henry Bathe, 
from February 16, till August 18, 1877; Rev. F. X. Deimel, 
from August 1877 till May 28, 1881; during Father Deimel's 
illness. Rev. Eustachius Vollmer, O. F. M., and Rev. Charles 
Rosenbauer, C. SS. R., attended the parish; Rev. William 
Berg, since May 28, 1881. 

Schererville exists since 1866. All the old settlers of these 
regions were Catholic, and according to convenience attended 
the churches at St. John, Turkey Creek, Crown Point or Dyer. 
In the year 1874, Bishop Dwenger approved the project of 
building a church at Schererville, and placed the undertaking 
under the supervision of Rev. Henry Meissner, pastor at Crown 
Point. Four and a quarter acres of land, for church and 
cemetery purposes, were donated by Nicholas Scherer, after 
whom the town is named. The church was a frame structure 
45x95 feet, with a tower 100 feet. It was dedicated by Bishop 
Dwenger at the end of September 1874, and placed under the 
patronage of St. Michael, the Archangel. The church cost 
|5,000. The congregation was anxious to have a resident 
priest, and, with this end in view, they built a priest's house 
at a cost of about |1,800, in 1875. 



338 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

Rev. Godfrey Kueng was the first resident pastor; he was 
a good priest, but, having no taste for financial matters, he 
resigned in October 1876, and returned to his native country 
in Tvrol. Father Bathe provided some vestments, and Father 
Deimel procured two bells, stations of the Cross and both 
these pastors reduced the debt. Father Deimefs health was 
not good. He spent about two years in the Alexian Brothers' 
Hospital, at St. Louis. When Father Berg took charge he 
found a debt of $2,300. He made many improvements and 
repairs on the church and house, and when, in the summer of 
1889, all the church debt had been paid, he was given a three 
months' vacation to visit his native country; during which 
time his brother, Rev. John B. Berg had charge of the parish. 

The cemetery is adjacent to the church, on the west side, 
and was blessed by Bishop Rademacher, on September 27, 
1895. In the year 1893, the church was frescoed, and repaired 
at a cost of $1,200. The Main Altar and the two Side .Altars 
and their statuary were provided gradually, costing probably 
§1,300. The church received ten stained glass windows in 
1889, a new roof in 1890, a hot air furnace underneath the 
church and in 1897, a pipe organ. The church is supphed 
with vestments, sacred utensils and everything necessary in 
the line of furniture. 

Father Berg secured the services of the Sisters of St. 
Francis, of Joliet, in 1886, to teach the public school. They 
had lived in a rented house for two years, when a separate 
residence was built for them, in 1888. The public school 
arrangement proved unsatisfactory, for many reasons. In 
1893, the old pubhc school building was sold, and 20x24 feet 
of it was moved to the church for school purposes, and, in the 
year 1900, an addition was made to it, affording two roomy 
apartments for school purposes. The building was blessed on 
September 15, 1900, and on the day after the school opened 
with an attendance of 42 pupils. The school building measures 
24x50 feet, and cost Si, 200. 

St. Michael's has these Societies: St. Mary's Altar 
Societ}-, over twenty-five years old, has done much for the 
sanctuary. St. Michael's Society for men. The Catholic Order 
of Foresters. The Columbian League of Indiana. The Young 
Ladies' Sodality of the Blessed Virgin. Ten young ladies of 



The Churches, Continued. 339 

the parish have entered religious communities. In 1888 the 
Apostleship of Prayer was canonically estabHshed and has now 
150 members. The aggregate membership of these societies 
is 500. The school is attended by eighty-five children, taught 
by two Sisters. There is no debt on the church property. 



TIPTON. 

ST. John's church. 



1874. 

Tipton changed its name from Kingston to Canton and 
then to Tipton. The town was laid out in 1844, and in those 
days Catholics in Tipton and vicinity were few and far between. 
The first priest, as far as can be ascertained, who said Mass in 
Tipton county, was Rev. Simon Siegrist, pastor of St. Mary's 
Church, at Indianapolis, who, on occasion of a sick call to 
Tipton, said Mass in the home of John Murphy. In 1856, 
Rev. D. Maloney came occasionally and said Mass alternately 
at the homes of John Murphy at Tipton, and of James Sheil 
at Shieldsville (now Atlanta), five miles south of Tipton. 
Next came Rev. B. J. Force, stationed at Peru. After him, 
Rev. Bernard Kroeger from Peru, who having assistants from 
1864 to 1871 attended Tipton, at regular intervals. These 
assistants were: Rev. C. Mougin 1864, Rev. Lawrence Lamoor 
1865, Rev. Michael Hanley 1867, Rev. B. T. Borg 1869, Rev. P. 
Frawley 1870, and Rev. J. H. O'Brien in 1871. Rev. John 
Grogan attended Tipton as a station, from Kokomo. 

Rev. Francis Lordemann, pastor at Kokomo, attending 
Tipton built the first church there in 1874, a small frame 
structure 30x40 feet, costing |1,200. At that time the congre- 
gation at Tipton consisted of fifteen families. The church 
grounds consist of seven lots; three of these, on which the 
church and priest's house stand, were secured by Father B. 
Kroeger in 1866; the four lots constituting the school grounds, 
were secured by Rev. F. G. Lentz, while pastor at Tipton. The 
Sisters of St. Joseph erected their convent on four lots, adjoin- 
ing the school property. 

The Rev. F. G. Lentz became the first resident pastor of 
St. John's Church, at Tipton, in July 1876. In 1881 he built 



340 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

an addition 30x30 feet to the church. The church was de- 
stroyed by fire, on the evening of December 14, 1885, caused 
by a defective flue. Until the completion of the new church 
divine services were held, first in one of the school-rooms, and 
later, when the school building had been completed, in the 
hall upstairs. The corner-stone for the new church was laid, 
on the site of the old, by Bishop Dwenger, June 16, 1889. 
Father Lentz remained long enough to see the church under 
roof, when he was succeeded by Rev. Anthony J. Kroeger, on 
June 5, 1890. Father Kroeger completed the church, and it 
was dedicated on August 30, 1891. Owing to the sickness of 
Bishop Dwenger, Very Rev. J. H. Brammer, V. G., officiated. 
The church is built in Gothic style, of brick and stone, has 
two towers, one 165 and the other 80 feet high. The dimensions 
are 130x60 feet, with a frontage of 85 feet. A life-size statue 
of St. John the Baptist is seen over the center entrance door. 
The church has three double entrance doors. In 1895, massive 
pews of quartered oak were placed, at a cost of $1,500. In 
1898, the towers were completed and the brick work was tuck- 
pointed, at a cost of |3,000. In 1900, excavation for basement 
was made and the steam heating plant installed, for $3,000. 
In 1901, the church received electric light, for $600. In the 
same year three altars were placed; the main altar costing 
$1,000 was donated by Francis Mattingly, one of the side 
altars costing $500 was presented by James Shell. In 1903, 
a set of stations of the Cross (statuary) was added, the gift of 
F. J. Froelich, having cost $800. In the same year two large 
transept windows 30x16 feet, one representing the Nativitv 
of our Lord and the Adoration by the Magi, the other His 
Ascension, were placed at a cost of $1,700. In 1904, the church 
was refrescoed, a work of art throughout; the side walls are 
done in plain olive green, the ceiling divided into fields con- 
tains the twelve Apostles life-size, and over the transept 
windows are seen the four Evangelists. The sanctuary espec- 
ially is beautifully done. The cost of this work was $2,000. 
In 1906, a new pipe organ was installed, at a cost of $3,000. 
The school-house, erected by Father Lentz in 1885, was a 
two-story brick and stone building, 65x50 feet, with two school- 
rooms on the first floor, and the second floor the hall for society 
meetings, school entertainments, provided with stage, etc. 



The Churches, Continued. 341 

The cost was about |5,000. From^ 1885 to 1888, the school 
was taught by lay-teachers, after which the Sisters of St. Joseph 
took charge. The Sisters resided in a cottage, on the southeast 
corner of the school property, until the summer of 1891, when 
they moved into their new convent, adjoining the school 
property opposite the church. The usual grades are taught, 
including high school. The number of pupils is 133. 

The first priest's house was built, in 1876, by Father 
Lentz. It was a story-and-a-half brick house, with eight small 
rooms. In 1897, a new priest's house, a two-story brick and 
stone building was erected by Father Kroeger. It is a house 
of twelve, well arranged, commodious rooms, with a basement 
of five rooms. The building cost only |7,000. The little 
frame house, used for a time by the Sisters, is still there, and 
answers the purpose of an infirmary, when needed. 

The Catholic cemetery consists of two acres, adjoining the 
non-Catholic cemetery, southwest of the city limits. It was 
bought by Father Lentz, in 1 879 for $150. The church property 
is without debt. St. John's Parish has the Emerald Benevolent 
Association, organized in 1885, by Father Lentz. This society 
merged into the present St. John's Benevolent Association, in 
1890, and has a membership of fifty. The Catholic Benevolent 
Legion of Indiana, since 1900, with thirty-five members. The 
Young Men's Sodality, since 1890, with sixty members. The 
Rosary Confraternity, since 1895, with eighty-five members. 
The Young Ladies' Sodality, since 1877, with sixty-five mem- 
bers. The Holy Angels' Society, since 1906, with nineteen 
members. The women's societies look after the needs of the 
sanctuary. The number of souls is 675, or 142 families, and 
three girls of the parish have entered the convent. The 
pastorate of Father Kroeger continued until January 1, 1907, 
when he was succeeded by the Rev. Anthony Henneberger. 



FOWLER. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 

1875. 

The town of Fowler was platted October 27, 1872, and 
was named after its founder. About twelve Irish Catholic 
famiHes settled in the town. In the fall of 1874, Rev. John 



342 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

R. Dinnen, then pastor of Oxford, visited Fowler and made 
preparations for the building of a church. Moses Fowler 
donated four lots, or one-half block, and Father Dinnen bought 
the other half for |100, and donated it. In the spring of 1875, 
a frame church was built, 22x40 feet, the furnishing of which 
consisted of a plain, little, home-made altar, three dozen 
second-hand pews, a set of vestments, linens and a small chalice. 
Bishop Dwenger dedicated the church, under the invocation 
of St. John, the Evangelist. Succeeding Father Dinnen in 
October 1875, Rev. Meinrad McCarthy, O. S. B., had charge 
of Oxford and Fowler until October 6, 1877. In September 
1875, Bishop Dwenger bought 200 acres of land a half mile 
south of Fowler, on which to erect a Catholic College. The 
conveyance was made upon condition, that the deed would be 
void if the grantee would fail to erect a college building, worth 
a specified sum, within one year. Bishop Dwenger left the 
matter in the hands of Father McCarthy, who failed to interest 
the Abbey of St. Meinrad in the undertaking, and the whole 
project fell through. 

Rev. John Lang pastor at Oxford, attended to Fowler, 
from October 1877 until April 19, 1878. After him Rev. John 
Dempsey, from April 19, 1878 to January 1, 1882. He had 
charge also of St. Bridget's, as a mission. The congregation, 
at this time, numbered about twenty-five families. He built 
a priest's house, from his own means, which he occupied during 
his stay in Fowler. He fenced the entire church property. 
After him, Rev. P. J. Crosson was pastor of Fowler and the 
mission St. Bridget's, from January 1, 1882 to June 15th of 
the same year. He was succeeded by Rev. C. J. Maujay, from 
June 15, 1882 till May 1889. The mission, St. Bridget's, was 
now attended from Oxford and Earl Park, a mission, attached 
to Fowler. In 1887, however. Earl Park received a resident 
pastor, both places having now about forty families each. 
Father Maujay made a number of improvements; he purchased 
a new reed organ and organized a choir, provided a fine picture 
of the patron of the church, a set of new stations, ostensorium, 
cope, etc. Up to this time, he lived in a rented house; but in 
September, 1882, he bought a little frame house of three rooms 
and moved it on the church lots. This dwelling, 20x26 feet, 
was enlarged by an addition of 12x12 feet. The ceiling was 



The Churches, Continued. 343 

eight feet high. This work cost |500. A barn was built, 
20x24 feet, in 1883. In 1884, the number of famiHes having 
increased to fifty, an addition of 20 feet was made to the church. 
In the same year he bought a bell, weighing 1,385 pounds. 
In May, 1889, Father Maujay left Fowler to visit his aged 
parents in France, once more. For one month the parish was 
visited, on Sundays, by Rev. Michael Byrne, assistant at the 
Cathedral of Fort Wayne. Rev. A. Henneberger, newly 
ordained, was appointed pastor at Fowler and took charge 
June 29, 1889. At this time the parish numbered twenty- 
eight Irish, twenty Canadian and twelve German families. 
The new pastor built a small sacristy to the rear of the church. 
He organized St. Ann's Society, for the married women, and 
the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, for the single women, in 
1889. In 1891, a frame building, 26x32 feet, was erected for 
|800, on the first floor of which a school was opened in Septem- 
ber of that year, with an attendance of sixty-five children; 
and the second floor became the Sisters' residence. The 
Sisters of St. Francis have charge of the school. In 1892 an 
addition was made to this building, of 18x20 feet for |400. In 
the fall of 1894, it was resolved to build a new church, to cost 
about $10,000, and in May of 1895, the corner-stone was laid 
by Bishop Rademacher and on Ascension Day, 1896, the 
church was dedicated, in honor of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. 
The church is built in the Gothic style of architecture, 46x112 
feet. The steeple measures 125 feet, the interior elevation of 
the church is 38 feet, with a seating capacity of 400. The 
total cost, including furniture, was $15,000. The old school- 
house was now remodeled and made a priest's house, for $556.80, 
and the old church was changed into a two-room school-house, 
and the old priest's house, some what enlarged, was added to 
the school for a Sisters' residence, costing $491. 

In August, 1898, Father Henneberger was transferred to 
Attica and Rev. H. A. Hellhake took charge of Fowler, re- 
maining until August 12, 1900. The new pastor improved the 
church property in several respects. Father Henneberger was 
made pastor of Fowler, a second time, from August 12, 1900 
to January 1, 1907. Cement walks were put down in 1902. 
In the same year a pipe organ was bought for $1,200. In 
1903, twelve parishoners donated a set of stations of the Cross, 



344 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

at an expense of |700. In 1904, he erected a one-story building, 
40x60 feet, for |1,500 to be used for school purposes, since the 
old building had become wholly unfit for use. The eight 
grades are being taught by three Sisters, and the attendance 
is ninety-three. Four girls of the parish have become Sisters 
of St. Francis. 

The dead of the Sacred Heart Parish were buried in a 
cemetery, consisting of two acres of ground, but owing to a 
change of roadways, this cemetery was no longer desirable, 
and five acres were bought, situated along a public road, in 
1895. It has a strong, iron fence and in the center a Cruci- 
fixion group, life size. 

The Societies here, are: The League of the Sacred Heart, 
150 members; St. Ann's Society, for married women, eighty- 
four members; the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, for single 
Women, thirty-five members; the Guardian Angel Society, 140 
members; the Confraternity of the Precious Blood, for the 
relief of the Souls in Purgatory, 100 members; the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, St. Anthony's Court, since 1894, fifty 
members. 

The present pastor Rev. Michael P. Louen took charge of 
the Sacred Heart Church at Fowler, on January 1, 1907. The 
parish has 131 families, numbering 670 souls. The amount of 
debt on the church property is |4,100. 



LOGANSPORT. 
ST. Bridget's church. 

1875. 



St. Bridget's Congregation owns a whole square of ground 
in Logansport. Bishop Dwenger bought it, July 11, 1873, 
from Judge Dykmann, for the sum of |5,000. Prior to that 
time the forty-five families, or 125 souls, living in that part of 
the city, attended one or other of the existing parishes. Rev. 
Bernard Kroeger was the first pastor, who in 1875 erected a 
two-story structure, which has since served the purposes both 
of church and school. It cost about |8,800. The school was 
opened in 1875, and can accommodate about 120 children. 
About |350 was spent in furnishing the school. Sisters of 
St. Joseph, whose Mother-house is in Tipton, Indiana, teach 



The Churches, Continued. 345 

the eight grades, and they Hve in rooms annexed to the school. 
The priest's house was erected in 1893, by Father Kroeger, at 
an expense of |5,272; improvements were made on it from 
time to time. 

A hall for entertainments, socials and society meetings 
was built in 1890, at a cost of |2,500. The church property 
is not only free from debt, but has over $3,000 in the treasury. 
St. Bridget's has 113 families, numbering 610 souls. Two 
Sisters of St. Joseph, conducting the school, have 103 children 
in their charge. Four girls of the parish have become mem- 
bers of religious communities. 

The Rosary Society, for married people, organized in 1875, 
has seventy-four members; the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, 
for single men, has twenty-six members, and the same, for 
single women, has forty-nine members; the Children of Mary, 
thirty-five members; St. Anthony's League, since 1901, has 
103 members; and the League of the Sacred Heart, since 1890, 
has a membership of twenty-seven. 

The following priests have been assistants at St. Bridget's 
Church: Rev. John F. Noll, from December 1898 to February 
1899; Rev. Henry C. Kappel, from February 1899 to June 
1899; Rev. Michael J. Ford, from 1900 to 1902; Rev. James F. 
Connelly, from 1902 to 1905; Rev. John F. Kohl, since June 
30, 1905. 



REMINGTON. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 

1875. 

The first priest to visit Remington was the Rev. Joseph 
Stephan, who came here from about 1860 to 1870. In 1870, 
Rev. Anthony Messmann, residing at Kentland, visited Rem- 
ington regularly, celebrating Mass in the house of Timothy 
O'Connor, in the western part of town. At the same time 
Rev. August Young, residing at Rensselaer, said Mass from 
time to time in the home of John Eck, some eight miles north- 
west of here. At this time the number of families was about 
twenty-five. This state of things continued until 1875, when 
a frame church, 70x25 feet, serving the purposes of a school 
at the present time, was erected under the superintendence of 



ViWhcv Mossnunn. 1 ho church gtoinuis wore bought al 
thiVoront times, thtcv lots in 1875, two in KSvSI, and ono and a 
h.Ul in \'>(^^. Vvom 1876 till 188<V tho I'ranciscan Kalhors 
aitondod Konungton, as a n-jission. Ro\ . John WollingholV, 
O. l\ M., Ironi 1S76 visitcci evorv two wcvks. Ironi 187*^. 
Kov. (-tuicio Stallo. O. V. M.. and tVoni 1881, Rev. John B. 
Schnyxicr. (>. K. M. Ouring his pastorate the sanctuary and 
sacnstics wvir added to tho tVanio church. At this time tho 
cY>i\gT<^ation numbered aK>ul iovw faniihos. 

In 188x^ the Saciwl Heart C'hurch at Remington received 
its tirst ifsident pastor in the {XM-son of Rev. J. H. W'erdein. 
Ho erected a panvhial i^sidence of seven nx^ms at a cost of 
aKuit |!7(V(1. Rev. John B. Bei^j; broke gmund for the pi-esoni 
church in 1899, and after two yeai-s tho beautiful church was 
dedicatoci to the Sacixxi Heart of Jesus, on July 22, 19()l. 1 he 
^^ld franco church was moved acrass the street and converted 
into a scluv>l, at an oxjvnse of |l,5cX). The school was openoci 
in September 1903, in char^^e of two Franciscan Sisters of 
1 af ax-otto, teaching fifty-four children. The church proportx 
has a debt of $.^.5(X\ 

The Sacred Heart Church has the .Married Ladies' Sodality , 
tho ^oung Ladies' Stviality, the St. .\lo\-sius' Society, tho 
Children of Mary; as well as the Catholic Order of Forestei-s 
and the St, Joseph's Society, The total number of members 
is ISO. The parish has ninety-six families, or 450 souls. 

The following is a list of the pastors, from 1883 to 1907: 
Rev. J. H. Werdein, from 1883 till 1886; Rev. Henry A. Hell- 
hake, from May 1886 till August 1893; Rev, M. Kelly, from 
August till OctoKT 1893; Rev, J, B, Bei-g, from CVtober U\ 
1893 till July 4, 1905; Rev. GeoT^^ H. Hortsmann, since Jul\ 
4, 1905 . 



DUNNINGTON, 

ST. MARYS CHURCH, 
1876. 

AKvut four families lv>ught famis and settled in the wild 
prairie of the present Ounningtcw and surroundii"jg^, in 1870. 
They att»mded .Mass, during the summer season, at Kentland, 
a distance of aK>ut sew^teen miles. On July 7, IS74, the 



The Churches, Continued. 347 

Rev. John R. Dinnen, then pastor of Oxford, came out to the 
prairie, for the first time, and organized the new congregation, 
calHng it St. Michael's. He secured two lots at Talbott and 
put in a foundation for a new church, to be a frame building, 
30x40 feet. The congregation furnishing the stone and doing 
the hauling, the foundation cost |100. The foundation 
finished, the people objected to the building of the church at 
Talbott, because it was not centrally located. In the fall of 
1875, Rev. Meinrad M. McCarthy, O. S. B., succeeded Father 
Dinnen at Oxford and visited Dunnington twice a month, 
celebrating Mass in a school-house. The record shows that 
he was paid $15 for each visit. By this time the congregation 
had increased to fifteen families, Irish, German and French. 
On August 12, 1876, Father McCarthy bought the one acre of 
land on which the church and house now stand, and opposite 
to it, he bought two acres for cemetery, at !f!40 per acre. A 
month later he let the contract for a frame church, 30x40 feet, 
for |850 and called it St. Columbkill's Church. The first 
services were held in the new church on Christmas-day, 1876, 
and Father McCarthy continued to visit St. Columbkill's twice 
a month, until the fall of 1877, when he was succeeded by 
Rev. J. F. Lang. 

In 1881, Father Lang built an addition of 24x30 feet to 
the church and called it Holy Trinity Church. Hoffman's 
Directory of the next year called the place Langton. The 
number of families, at this time, was thirty-six. The pastorate 
of Father Lang terminated on April 30, 1882. Rev. John 
Grogan was the first resident pastor of the congregation, from 
June 25, 1882 till the summer of 1884. He built a pastoral 
residence, a one-and-a-half story frame structure, at a cost of 
|900. Father Grogan was succeeded by Rev. A. J. Strueder, 
who remained from the summer of 1884 till May 15, 1888. 

On May 15, 1888, Rev. F. J. Lambert, the present pastor, 
took charge of the congregation. The number of families had 
now increased to seventy, owning three acres of ground, on 
one of which stood the church and house, and the other two 
acres were used for cemetery. In 1892, Father Lambert bought 
the corner lot on to which he moved the old church. Adjoin- 
ing the church property, a quarter acre was donated for a new 
church. This new church, a substantial frame building of 



348 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

125x52 feet, was begun in July 1892 and was ready for occu- 
pancy on July 1 St, of the following year. The cost of this church 
was $9,000. The architecture of it is Gothic. It was frescoed 
for $1,000. The tower is 133 feet high and has a chime of 
three bells. The furniture is all antique oak, costing |2,500. 
In 1905 the hot air furnaces were discarded, and replaced by 
a steam heating plant, at a cost of $1,165. A light plant was 
installed this spring, for the church and house, costing $300. 
The seating capacity of the church is about 600. Father 
Lambert changed the name to St. Mary's Church, the feast of 
the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin being the patron feast. 

In the summer of 1893, a residence was built for the Sisters, 
opposite the church, being a two-story frame building, costing 
$1,500. The old church was remodeled into a school-house, 
with two commodious school-rooms and a large chapel, in 
which Mass is celebrated on week days during the winter 
season. In September, 1893, three Sisters of St. Francis 
opened the school with an attendance of eighty pupils, teaching 
the eight regular grades. The expense of the school is paid 
from the revenues of the church. The priest's house was 
remodeled in the fall of 1899 and a brick veneered building 
was added to it, at a cost of $4,950. It is a two-story building 
with basement and attic; it is heated by hot water, is lighted 
by acetylene gas and has all modern improvements. The entire 
church property has a debt of $2,890. 

St. Mary's has: The Catholic Order of Foresters, with a 
membership of sixty-four; St. Mary's Altar Society, with sixty 
members; St. Joseph's Society, with twenty-five members; the 
Purgatorian Society, with 150 members. The number of souls 
is 640, consisting of 117 families. The parochial school has an 
attendance of seventy-three children and is conducted by two 
Sisters of St. Francis, of Lafayette. Two of St. Mary's boys 
have become priests and five girls. Sisters. 



GARRETT. 

SS. PETER AND PAUL's CHURCH. 

1876. 

A small frame church, 24x26 feet, was built at Garrett 
and was opened for divine service, on June 29, 1876. The 



I 



The Churches, Continued. 349 

congregation increasing rapidly, a cruciform addition of 110x50 
feet was made to the church, in 1886. This addition, beauti- 
fully painted on the interior, with three altars and pulpit, 
stained glass windows and a bell cost |5,000. The seating 
capacity of the church was 300. A two-story pastoral resi- 
dence, at a cost of |1,500, was provided and the first resident 
pastor. Rev. August Young, took possession of it, on Novem- 
ber 10, 1886. In 1893, another addition had to be built to the 
church, increasing the seating capacity to 500, costing $3,300. 
This, the SS. Peter and Paul's Church, was dedicated by Bishop 
Rademacher, on September 16, 1893. 

The present school-house, situated a hundred feet south 
of the church on Peter street, was begun in 1888, by erecting 
the main building, 54x32 feet, and one wing 18x30 feet. This 
portion contains four school-rooms. At that time, 180 pupils 
were enrolled and the school was taught by five Sisters of the 
Precious Blood. In 1904, the school had become inadequate 
for the accommodation of the children to such a degree, that 
twenty-four children could not be admitted for want of room. 
Accordingly, in 1905, the school was enlarged by completing 
it, after the original plan, giving four additional school-rooms. 
The building presents a beautiful appearance, built of brick, 
trimmed with Bedford stone, with an elevation of two-stories 
and basement. In all its appointments it is the most com- 
pletely equipped school-house, in Dekalb county. At the 
present time, 226 pupils are in attendance. The usual eight 
grades are taught and the four grades of high school. Since 
1894 a goodly number of pupils have graduated annually. The 
school can accommodate 400 children. It is a free school all 
expenses being paid by the School Society. Seven Sisters of 
the Precious Blood conduct the school. 

The congregation has 147 families, numbering 583 souls. 
The Sisters' residence was built in 1890 for |2,000. 

On the 10th day of January 1897, seven and a half acres 
of land were purchased just outside of the city limits, for |800. 
This plot of ground was laid out for cemetery, has 750 lots, 
beautiful drives and walks; and the total amount spent on it 
is about $3,000. The amount of debt on the church property 
is $2,550. 



350 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

PORTLAND. 

CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

1876. 

The first priest, known to have visited Portland, was 
Rev. Joseph Dwenger, C. PP. S., later Bishop of Fort Wayne, 
who celebrated Mass and preached in the Court House, at stated 
intervals. It was visited, as a. station in 1873, by Rev. Paul 
Reuter, C. PP. S., from St. Mary's Home, near New Corydon. 
He came on horseback and celebrated Mass once a month on 
week days, at the home of F. V. Gigandet, about two and one- 
half miles northwest of Portland. The first Catholics of this 
neighborhood were mostly Irish. 

Father Reuter called a meeting of all the Catholics of Port- 
land, consisting of about seven families, on April 3, 1875, at 
which it was determined to build a church. Everybody, 
Catholic and non-Catholic, in Portland and in the neighborhood 
of it contributed generously, and in a short time |600 were 
secured. A lot was bought on East Walnut street for |25. 
From 1876 till 1888 services were conducted, in the church at 
Portland, on two Sundays of every month by the Sanguinist 
Fathers from Fort Recovery, Ohio, and from St. Mary's Home, 
near New Corydon, Indiana. The church was built, in 1876, 
by the Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., a frame structure, 28x40 
feet, costing $1,185. Two additional lots were bought, in 
1888, by Rev. Joachim Baker, at a cost of |1,200, on one of 
which stood a small cottage, which is used as the priest's resi- 
dence. The Rev. L. A. Eberle, in 1906, remodeled the church 
and built an addition of 28x32 feet to the nave of the church, 
adding also a new sacristy 15x15 feet, at a cost of 1 1,900. 
The seating capacity of the church is about 200. The priest's 
house was remodeled and a kitchen, bath room and pantry 
added in 1903 by Father Paquet. 

The societies are: The Living Rosary Society since 1905 
with thirty-two members; the Children of Mary, made up of 
boys and girls who have made their first communion, with 
twenty members. The number of souls is 180, consisting of 
forty families. 

Beginning with Rev. Joseph Dwenger, C. PP. S., in the 
early 70s up to July 18«8, Portland was attended by Fathers 



The Churches, Continued. 351 

of the Most Precious Blood: Rev. Paul Reuter, C. PP. S.; 
Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., 1876 till January 1878; Rev. 
Cosmas Seeberger, C. PP. S., from January 1878 to December 
1878; Rev. Aloysius Malin, C. PP. S., from December 1878 to 
May 1882; Rev. August Seifert, C. PP. S., from May 1882 to 
September 1882; Rev. Joseph Heitz, C. PP. S., from September 
1882 to February 1885; Rev. J. O. Misler, C. PP. S., from 
February 1885 to November 1885; Rev. M. L. Dentinger, C. 
PP. S., from November 1885 to March 1888; Rev. John A. 
Nageleisen, C. PP. S., from March 1888 to July 1888; Rev. 
Joachim Baker, first resident pastor, from July 1888 to October 
1891 ; Rev. Anthony J. Strueder, from October 1891 to October 
1894; Rev. Constantine Maujay, from October 11, 1894 to 
October 1900; Rev. J. P. Lasher, from November 25, 1900 till 
July 1, 1901; Rev. Thomas M. Conroy, from July 1, 1901 to 
July 1, 1902; Rev. L. R. Paquet, from July 1902 to February 
1904; Rev. Paulinus Trost, C. PP. S., from March 1904 to July 
1904; Rev. Lawrence A. Eberle, since July 3, 1904. 

The present debt on the church property is |600. The 
pastor of Portland has charge of the mission Geneva, 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. hedwig's church. 

1876. 

Polish people have been arriving in South Bend since 
1869. Up to 1877 they were part of St. Patrick's Congrega- 
ticfn, and worshipped in the old St. Patrick's Church, on west 
Division street. Their spiritual wants were attended to by 
Polish priests from Chicago and from Otis, then known as 
Salem Crossing. Two of these priests were. Rev. Peter Koncz 
and Rev. Louis Machdzicki. The number of souls at this 
time had increased to 125 families. 

On January 1, 1877, Rev. Valentine Czyzewski, C. S. C, 
took charge of the congregation, residing at St. Patrick's 
parochial residence. The first church, located on Monroe 
street, was started in the fall of 1876, and was finished and 
blessed on July 1, 1877. It was a frame structure, 83x40 feet, 



352 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

and 24 feet in height. The cost of this church was |3,500. 
In 1879, a cyclone totally destroyed this church. The present 
church property on Scott street was bought at a cost of |2,325 
on January 18, 1880. The present St. Hedwig's Church was 
begun on August 12, 1881, and was dedicated April 15, 1883. 
The style is the Romanesque, its length 149 feet and the width 
sixty-two feet; the main walls being thirty-three feet in height 
and the steeple 156 feet. The altars used for several years 
were temporary, and the church, including pews, was erected 
at an outlay of |33,000. It was entirely remodeled in 1898: 
pillars were placed in position to support the roof, steel arched 
ceilings were provided, new pews replaced the old ones, together 
with decorations of various kinds, amounting in all to $7,300. 
In 1891, three very fine altars were donated by the societies 
of the church. The St. Hedwig's Society donated the Main 
Altar, costing $2,500. The two side altars were donated by 
the St. Stanislaus' Society, at a cost of $1,200. The organ 
was donated at an expense of $2,500, by the St. Casimir's 
Society. The seating capacity of the church is 920. 

The first school of brick, containing eight rooms and two 
offices, was built in 1884 and was destroyed by fire, on Feb- 
ruary 4, 1886. The present school is three-stories in height 
and its dimensions are 126x62 feet. It contains twelve school- 
rooms, a large hall and two rooms for office purposes. It has 
an attendance of 735 children. The school was erected in 
1886, and cost $28,000. The interior was entirely repainted 
in 1905, at an expense of $600. In the same year, an iron 
fence was built around the church property. The school is 
taught by eight Sisters of the Holy Cross and five female lay- 
teachers. The Sisters reside in St. Joseph's Academy, one 
block away from St. Hedwig's school. The original school 
building is now used as a society room, and also for choir 
practice, as well as by St. Florian's Turners. 

The parochial residence is a frame building, and was 
moved to the present site in 1884, having been purchased by 
Father Czyzewski at a cost of $3,000. An addition was made 
to the house in 1884; and the hot water heating apparatus 
was provided for it, in 1904. This house is the first parochial 
residence and, until it was ready for occupancy. Father 
Czyzewski resided with the pastor of St. Patrick's Church, 



The Churches, Continued. 353 

St. Hedwig's Church has numerous societies: St. Stanis- 
laus Kostka's Society, St. CasimiY's, St. Hedwig's, St. Vincent 
de Paul's, St. Valentine's, St. Adalbert's, St. Florian's, the 
Apostleship of Prayer, the Young Ladies' Holy Rosary Society, 
the Children of Mary, the Guardian Angel Society and the 
Temperance Society. The number of souls in the parish is 
about 4000, or 828 families. There is a debt of .|1 9,000 on the 
church property. 

Father Czyzewski has been the pastor of St. Hedwig's 
Church, since January 1, 1877. In 1896, he bought the lots 
for, and organized St. Casimir's Congregation, and in 1898 he 
did the same for St. Stanislaus' Parish. He also built churches 
at Terre Coupee and Rolling Prairie. Among the assistants, 
Father Czyzewski has had, may be mentioned Rev. Michael 
Lauth, C. S. C, Rev. A. Zubowicz, C. S. C, Rev. C. Sztuczko, 
C. S. C, Rev. R. A. Marciniak, C. S. C, Rev. Casimir Smogor, 
C. S. C, Rev. Eligius Raczynski, C. S. C, Rev. Theodore 
Jarzynski, C. S. C, Rev. George Kolesinski and Rev. Boniface 
Iwaszewski, C. S. C. Three regular and four secular priests 
have come from St. Hedwig's Parish and thirty young women 
have entered different convents. 



CHAPTER XII. 



THE CHURCHES — CONTINUED 

1878-1887 

FRANKFORT — HAMMOND, ST. JOSEPH'S — EARL PARK — GOOD- 
LAND — ELWOOD — NORTH JUDSON — RENSSELAER — HARTFORD 

CITY — SOUTH BEND — ST. MARY'S — TERRE COUPEE 

WANATAH. 



FRANKFORT. 

ST. MARY's CHURCH. 

1878. 

The priests, who have had charge of Frankfort from the 
beginning to the present time, are the following: Rev. Edward 
O' Flaherty, Crawfordsville, 1859; Rev. George A. Hamilton, 
Logansport, 1860; Rev. A. B. Oechtering, Delphi, 1861; Rev. 
Francis Lordemann, Kokomo, 1874 till 1888; Rev. Leo Molen- 
graft, O. F. M., from 1888 till 1890; Rev. Peter A. Welling, 
O. F. M., from 1890 till August 1890; Rev. John C. Heitmann, 
O. F. M., from August 1890 till August 1891; Rev. Ignatius 
M. Wilkens, O. F. M., from August 1891 till July 1892; Rev. 
John Blum, from July 1892 till December 24, 1895; Rev. 
Angelus Hafertepe, O. F. M., from January till August 1896; 
Rev. Aloysius Kurtz, O. F. M., from August 1896 till August 
1898; Rev. Samuel Gelting, O. F. M., from August 1, till Sep- 
tember 10, 1898; Rev. P. J. O'Reilly, from September 10, 1898 
till June 1899; Rev. F. J. Jansen, from June 1899 till October 
30, 1906; Rev. William B. Hordeman, since October 30, 1906. 

There is no record to show, that Father Badin, or any of 
the earUest missionaries visited Frankfort or its vicinity. 
Father O' Flaherty was the first to come from Crawfordsville, 
in 1859, as well as Father Hamilton, from Lafayette, in the 
year following. From the year 1875, Frankfort was attended 
once a month. In the beginning, the services were held at 
the house of Ignatius O'Leary. A lot 132x150 feet, on the 



The Churches, Continued. 355 

Jefferson gravel road, was bought in 1878 for |150. A frame 
structure, 40x20 feet, was erected on it for a church, and 
everything about the church was primitive and inexpensive. 
When Father Lordemann could no longer attend Frankfort, 
the Bishop gave the Franciscan Fathers of Lafayette charge 
of it, from 1888 till 1892, and again from 1896 till 1898. 

Rev. John Blum was the first resident pastor, from July 1, 
1892 till January 1896. Bishop Dwenger selected the present 
location on Walnut and Second streets, 132 feet square, for 
|1,500. A Gothic frame structure was erected on it in 1892, 
costing $4,000. The dimensions of the church are 72x35 feet. 
When Father Blum left, there was a debt of |700. After this 
the Franciscan Fathers of Lafayette visited the place twice a 
month. During their time an altar, new pews as well as the 
frescoing of the church were provided. All the debt had been 
paid, when Father O'Reilly took charge, and during his stay 
of nine months, he built the present parochial residence, costing 
$1,800. He left a debt of |1,000 after him. On June 19, 
1906, Father Jansen bought a building, 51x17 feet, and moved 
it on the rear end of the church lot. It now serves the purpose 
of a hall, and later on may answer for school purposes. The 
cost of this improvement was |500. Father Jansen left the 
church at Frankfort, not only free from all indebtedness, but 
also with some money in the treasury. 

An Altar Society has been in existence, since 1874. It is 
for married women, and supplies the necessaries of the sanc- 
tuary. A Men's Society was organized in 1906, and a School 
Society, in 1905. The number of souls is 220, consisting of 
forty-two families. 



HAMMOND. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1879. 

The first Catholic families, few in number, who settled on 
farms in the Calumet region, near the place now called Saxony, 
came in the year 1860. They attended the church in Turkey 
Creek. In the year following. Bishop Luers, accompanied by 
Rev. Philip Wegemeyer, the pastor at Turkey Creek, visited 
these families and celebrated Mass in the home of John L. 



356 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Knorzer. Bishop Luers promised them, that Father Wege- 
meyer would visit them a few times a year. Up to 1877, these 
visits were made by Father Wegemeyer, and by Rev. George 
Steiner, of Michigan City. Gradually Hammond began to be 
a village twelve families of which were Catholic. These families, 
and the other families at Saxony, attended Mass in the resi- 
dence of William Klighe. At the solicitation of Rev. F. X. 
Baumgartner, pastor at Turkey Creek, M. Towle donated two 
lots, on State street near Hohman, in 1879, and in 1880, a 
donation of one acre of land, on the corner of Hohman and 
Russell streets, was received from Caroline Hohman. A small 
frame church 30x60 feet was erected in the summer of 1879, 
costing about |1,000; and Mass was celebrated in it, for the 
first time, by Father Baumgartner in December of the same 
year. Until the spring of 1883, the mission of Hammond was 
attended once a month, from Turkey Creek. On August 11, 
1881, John Verhofen donated one acre of land, situated on 
Hohman street and the Ridge Road, for cemetery purposes. 

In the year 1883, a priest's house was erected, costing 
about $2,400, of which Father Baumgartner took possession 
on April 7, 1883, as the first resident pastor of Hammond. His 
useful life came to a close, on May 9, 1885. The Rev. Philip 
Rothman, O. F. M., who assisted him during his illness, had 
charge of the parish till August 10, 1885. The present pastor. 
Rev. Henry M. Plaster, has had charge since August 16, 1885. 
On May 30, 1883, Bishop Dwenger visited Hammond, on which 
occasion he blessed the church, administered Confirmation, 
and also blessed a bell. 

Immediately upon his arrival. Father Plaster erected a 
one-story building, 24x40 feet, costing $600, for school pur- 
poses. School was opened in September of 1885, a lay-teacher 
having charge and the attendance being forty pupils. The 
following year the Sisters of Providence took charge, and the 
school building was increased to double its original size. 

In 1886 three acres were added to the cemetery. In the 
year 1888, the number of families had increased to such an 
extent, that the old church and school no longer sufficed, and 
Father Plaster determined to erect a two-story, 50x100 feet, 
church and school combination building. This building was 
completed at the close of January 1889. The first story con- 



The Churches, Continued. 357 

tained four large school-rooms, the second story was used for 
church purposes, and the cost of the building, including furni- 
ture, amounted to about $14,500. The building was dedicated 
by Bishop Dwenger,on September 29, 1889. The old school 
was remodeled for a Sisters' residence. In 1893, galleries were 
built in the church, and the seating capacity increased to 750. 
At this time, five acres of ground were secured for a new ceme- 
tery for |1,200. At an expense of |7,300, a residence was 
built for the Sisters; the building had three-stories and a base- 
ment and was completed on December 20, 1894. A belfry 
was erected, and a chime of three bells put in, blessed by 
Bishop Rademacher. In 1899, an addition was built to the 
church and school, 26x75 feet, costing |6,000 and a steam 
heating plant was installed for |1,700. 

In the year 1890, the Polish members of the congregation 
formed St. Casimir's Parish; and in 1896, All Saints' Congre- 
gation was organized, German Catholics only remaining with 
St. Joseph's Church. In 1901 the pipe organ was bought for 
|2,500. In 1902 the sum of $1,800 was expended for five 
acres additional to the cemetery. On December 12, 1904, 
Rev. H. M. Plaster celebrated his Sacerdotal Silver Jubilee and 
the congregation the silver jubilee of its organization, with 
great solemnity. In memory of this double jubilee, a new 
parochial residence was provided. The building has three- 
stories and a basement, complete in every particular, including 
furniture, costing $17,000. 

The following were the pastors in charge of St. Joseph's 
Church: Rev. Philip Wegemeyer, Turkey Creek, from 1858 
till 1875; Rev. George Steiner, Michigan City, from 1858 till 
1875; Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, Turkey Creek, from 1875 till 
1881 ; Rev. Charles Rosenbauer, C. SS. R., from 1881 till spring 
1883; Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, from April 7, 1883 till May 9, 
1885; Rev. Philip Rothman, O. F. M., from May 9, till August 
10, 1885; Rev. Henry M. Plaster, since August 16, 1885. 

The following were the assistants at St. Joseph's: Rev. 
John Tremmel in 1890; Rev. F. C. Shea, from 1894 till 1896; 
Rev. Henry C. Kappel, from August 1897 till March 1899; 
Rev. George Lauer, from March 1, 1899 till July 7, 1899; Rev. 
John Sand, from July 6, 1899 till July 6, 1901; Rev. Joseph 
Abel, from July 11, 1901 till June, 1902; Rev. Francis Koch, 



358 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

from June 1902 till October 1903; Rev. Charles F. Keyser from 
October 1903 to November 6, 1905; Rev. Bruno Soengen, since 
November 15, 1905. 

Three boys of the congregation have become Jesuits, and 
three more are preparing for the priesthood. Six girls have 
become Sisters. The Rosary Society, for married people; the 
Sodalities, for single people; the Holy Angels' Society, for 
children; the League of the SS. Heart; St. Joseph's Society, 
have a total membership of 947. The Foresters have 223 
members. 

The school is conducted by nine Sisters of Providence, 
with an attendance of 367 pupils. St. Joseph's has 281 families, 
numbering 1279 souls. The debt on the church property is 
17,553.36. 



EARL PARK. 

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST's CHURCH. 
1880. 

The Rev. John Hoss, pastor of St. Anthony's Church, 
attended to the spiritual wants of the Catholics in and about 
Earl Park. It was during his time, about the year 1880, that 
the first church was built capable of accommodating about 
300 persons. The records indicate that the Rev. Joseph 
Stephan, Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, Rev. A. Messmann, Rev. 
C. Maujay and Rev. Thomas Vagnier, C. S. C, performed 
pastoral functions here. The latter was the first resident 
pastor at Earl Park, from 1887 till August 1895. The number 
of Catholic families at that time was about forty. The pastors, 
up to that time, were obliged to live in rented houses. But 
when Rev. P. J. Weber took charge he bought three lots east 
of the old church and on it erected a priest's house for |5,500 
with all modern improvements. 

A new church now became a necessity and on September 
28, 1902, the corner-stone of this new church was laid. The 
architecture of the building is Roman, with two massive towers. 
The interior decorations and the furnishings are in harmony 
with the architectural style of the building. The dimensions 
are generous; the seating capacity will be sufficient for six- 
hundred worshippers. 



The Churches, Continued. 359 

After the new church was ready for service the old church 
building was remodeled for a school. In this building there 
are three large school-rooms for the children, and eight rooms 
for the Sisters. The Sisters of St. Dominic have charge of the 
school with an attendance of over 100 children. 



GOODLAND. 

SS. PETER AND PAUL's CHURCH, 
li 



Goodland was a mission, from 1872 till October 1903. 
The priests, who attended the place, during this time, were 
the following: Rev. A. Messmann, Kentland, from 1872 till 
1878; Rev. John Hoss, St. Anthony, from 1878 till 1881; Rev. 
F. X. Baumgartner, Kentland, from 1881 till 1883; Rev. W. 
Conrad Miller, Kentland, from 1 883 till 1 888 ; Rev. A.J. Strueder , 
St. Anthony, from 1888 till 1891; Rev. Joachim Baker, St. 
Anthony, from 1891 till 1898; Rev. F. Von Schwedler, St. 
Anthony, from 1896 till 1898; Rev. F. J. Bilstein, St. Anthony, 
from 1898 till 1900; Rev. G. A. Zern, St. Anthony, from 1900 
till October 1903. 

Father Zern was the first resident pastor at Goodland, 
from October 2, 1903 till August 27, 1905, the date of his death 
in St. Joseph's Hospital at Logansport. Rev. Francis A. King, 
residing at Goodland was Father Zern's assistant, from June 
1902 till August 9, 1903. Rev. Ignatius F. Zircher has been 
the pastor at Goodland, since October 10, 1905. 

In 1877 Goodland had eight Catholic families. A lot was 
purchased, in 1880, and a frame church erected, at a cost of 
about |1,000, Father Hoss attending the place at the time. 
The priest's house is a very old dwelling, which stood on one 
of five lots, purchased in 1902, for |2,400, by Father Zern, 
attending the mission at the time. 

The present church is a brick edifice, 98x54 feet, with a 
seating capacity of 400. The exterior is imitation Gothic and 
the interior Roman. It cost about |14,000. The corner-stone 
was laid on November 9, 1902, and the church was dedicated, 
by Bishop Alerding, on July 12, 1903. The number of souls 



360 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

is 325, consisting of 55 families. The debt on the church 
property is $4,200. 

The Societies are: The Rosary Society, for married 
women, forty-four members; St. Aloysius' Sodality, for single 
men, twelve members; the Blessed Virgin's SodaHty, for single 
women, thirty-five members; the Guardian Angel Society, for 
children, twenty-five members. 

Morocco is a mission attended from Goodland. 



ELWOOD. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1881. 

Prior to 1868, Elwood was called Quincy. The earliest 
record of visits made by priests here, were the visits of Rev. 
Michael Clark and Rev. D. Maloney, of Lafayette, and Rev. 
FitzMaurice, of Anderson. From 1860 to 1865, Rev. John 
McMahon attended it from Anderson. The first Mass was 
celebrated in the house of John Buchanan, on the corner of 
Main and Sixteenth streets, in 1862. The Catholic population 
at that time consisted of half a dozen families, Irish and German, 
who were employed on the railroad. The so-called "section- 
house," in which Mass was frequently said, may still be seen 
on South B street. Aside from these, Mass was celebrated 
also in the houses of Bernard Bauer, Gustave Kramer and 
Bridget Smith. Father McMahon bought two lots of ground 
on South A street, and his successor, Rev. J. B. Crawley, who 
attended Elwood from 1865 till 1884, from Anderson, erected 
the first church. It was a brick structure, 25x40 feet, with a 
sacristy 10x10 feet, and was dedicated by Bishop Dwenger, in 
the fall of 1881. The cost was $1,500. Rev. F. C. Wiechmann 
attended the Elwood mission from 1884 to 1889, from Anderson, 
on the fourth Sunday of each month. On July 29, 1889, 
Elwood received its first resident pastor, in the person of Rev. 
B. Biegel. At this time Elwood had a population of 800, with 
twenty Catholic families; but, owing to the discovery of natural 
gas, the town increased rapidly. 

A six-room priest's house, costing $1,000, was built next 



The Churches, Continued. 361 

to the little church, upon Father Bdegel's arrival. In 1891, 
five acres of ground, located about one mile south-west of the 
town, were bought for a Catholic cemetery, at a cost of $600. 
In 1892, the church was enlarged to three times its size, and 
improved at a cost of $2,500. A bell also was bought that 
year. 

A one-room frame building, 26x40 feet, was put up north 
of the church, for $650. This was the beginning of the parish 
school, taught by a lay-teacher, Father Biegel hearing the 
classes in the priest's house. A second room, 26x25 feet, 
costing $550, was added in 1893. Eight lots adjoining the 
church property were secured in 1894, for $1,000. In Sep- 
tember of this year, the Sisters of St. Joseph took charge of 
the parochial school. A residence was needed for the Sisters, 
who were living in a rented house across the street; and in 
1896, the pastor gave them his own residence. A new twelve- 
room, frame priest's house was erected for $3,000, and the 
house-warming took place on October 3, 1896. In 1898, the 
school was damaged by fire, but the loss was fully covered by 
insurance, and a second story with two rooms was added. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid on October 8, 
1899, by the Very Rev. J. H. Guendling, Administrator of the 
diocese. The basement has an elevation of twelve feet. The 
building was enclosed in 1900, and on July 14, 1901, the new 
church was solemnly dedicated by Bishop Alerding. The 
church is built of brick and Bedford stone, in the Romanesque 
style of architecture. It is 138x56 feet, one of the towers 
having an elevation of 138 feet, the other 101 feet. The 
interior elevation is forty-one feet. It is heated by steam and 
has a $3,500 organ. 

In order to gain more school-room, the old church building 
was converted into a school, and the Sisters' house was en- 
larged, at a cost of $1,500, in 1901. Large sized, full relief 
Stations of the Cross costing $1,500 were secured, in 1902: a 
Sacred Heart altar and baptismal font in 1903, for $300: and 
the basement of the church was paved with cement, for $600. 

In 1905, a livery stable across the street from the church 
property was bought for $3,500, and shortly after, a house 
and lot adjoining the church property on the west, for $600. 
A creek north of the church property, which had been a source 



362 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of annoyance to the parish, received a retaining wall, 280 feet 
long, at a cost of |1,500, paid jointly by the city and the 
parish. The church grounds were low and swampy, and it 
took 10,000 yards of earth, to put the lots in proper condition, 
at an expense of |1,000. Three hundred and fifty feet of 
cement sidewalk, ten feet wide, cost |800, in 1906. The church 
grounds have a frontage of 350 feet, with a depth of 228 feet. 
There is a debt of $6,700 on the church property. 

Seven Sisters of St. Joseph teach the eight grades and a 
course of high school. The school has an attendance of 264 
pupils. There are two school buildings, each containing four 
rooms, furnishing ample accommodations: but the intention is 
to erect a school building, to harmonize with the church, in 
the not distant future. 

St. Joseph's Church has the Rosary Society for the Married 
Ladies; the Young Men and the Young Ladies' Sodahty, for 
the young people; the Holy Name Society, for the Married 
Men; the Society of the Children of Mary, and of the Infant 
Jesus for the children. The Apostleship of Prayer was estab- 
lished, in 1894. The Catholic Benevolent Legion since 1893, 
the Ancient Order of Hibernians since 1898, the Catholic Order 
of Foresters since 1900, the Knights of Columbus since 1903, 
the Ladies Auxiliary of the Ancient Order of Hibernians since 
1898 and the Ladies Catholic Benevolent Association since 
1903. The aggregate membership of these organizations is 
1148. These societies have commodious and well furnished 
quarters, with a reading room and elegant apartments for 
innocent recreation. One young man has entered the Brother- 
hood of Mary, two young men are at present theological 
students, and four girls have become Sisters of St. Joseph. 



NORTH JUDSON. 

SS. CYRIL AND METHODIUS' CHURCH. 
1881. 

North Judson dates its beginning to 1859, when the P. C. 
C. &: St. L. railroad was built. Not, however, until 1871 were 
any Catholics to be found here. In this year, and the year 



The Churches, Continued. 363 

following, we find only two Catholic families. The progress 
of Catholicity was slow, and it was not until the year 1881, 
that an effort was made by the Catholics to erect a place of 
worship. Prior to this, the Fathers of the Most Precious Blood 
visited the few Catholic families infrequently, celebrating Mass, 
most probably, in a building situated on East Lane street. 
North Judson's first hotel. The present site was donated by 
Louis and Jacob Keller. 

In the year 1874, the migration of Bohemian families to 
Railroad and Wayne townships began. Some eight or ten 
years later, the Bohemian population increased, and today this 
section has a larger percentage of Bohemians than anv other 
of the State. At the time of the building of the church, in 
1881, a list shows that the Catholics numbered about twenty- 
four families, with the Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., their 
visiting pastor. Irregular visits were made by the Fathers of 
the Most Precious Blood, of whom the best remembered, by 
the members of the parish, are the Rev. John Frericks and 
Rev. Alphonse Grussi. Under the administration of the latter, 
the congregation came into possession of a site for a cemetery, 
donated by Jacob Jachim. In 1884, Father Frericks, C. PP. S., 
dedicated the new cemetery. In 1885, the Rev. Dominic 
Shunk, C. PP. S., residing at San Pierre, attended to North 
Judson. He was succeeded by the Rev. Casimir Kobylinski, 
in the year 1891, who was the first resident pastor. Father 
Kobylinski remained for two years until the appointment of 
his successor in the person of the Rev. John F. Kubacki. In 
July 1894, Father Dominic again attended to the spiritual 
wants of the parish. During the pastorate of Father Koby- 
linski, the site of the present rectory was secured. 

In 1896, Father Kubacki was succeeded by Rev. Peter A. 
Kahellek, who in return was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Bolka, 
in July 1899. On November 25, 1904, Father Bolka was 
transferred to East Chicago and the Rev. Felix Thomas Seroc- 
zynski, given charge. The Rev. C. F. Keyser has been the 
pastor since June 8, 1907. North Judson has ninety-six 
Catholic families, numbering 438 souls. The church property 
is free from all indebtedness. The League of the Sacred Heart 
has a membership of 100. San Pierre is a mission attended 
from North Judson. 



364 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

RENSSELAER. 

ST. Augustine's church. 

■1882. 

The history of St. Augustine's Church and of the Diocesan 
Orphan Asylum are one and the same, from 1865 until 1887, 
when the parish was established in Rensselaer, and when the 
orphans were removed to Lafayette and to Fort Wayne. In 
July 1882, Rev. M. Zumbuelte began to build the present 
brick church at Rensselaer, 37x80 feet, at a cost of about 
$5,000. It was completed and dedicated, on January 18, 
1885. At that time the number of souls was about 150. Six 
lots of the present church grounds were bought by Bishop 
Luers. Rev. George L. Willard was pastor, from March to 
October 1888. It was in October of 1888, that the Bishop 
gave the Fathers C. PP. S., charge of St. Augustine's Congrega- 
tion, at Rensselaer, and the first of these Fathers appointed 
pastor was Rev. Anthony Dick, C. PP. S., who had charge 
until July, 1891. After him came Rev. Stanislaus Neiberg, 
C. PP. S., who gave the church new windows, new altars, a 
beautiful chandelier and frescoed the interior, paying also a 
debt of |600, which still rested on the church. While pastor 
of St. Augustine's, Father Neiberg was also professor at St. 
Joseph's College. Rev. Francis Schalk, C. PP. S., was the 
pastor from September 1896 till February 1897. He was 
succeeded by Rev. Bernard Dickmann, C. PP. S., who on 
account of sickness went south. After him came Rev. Edward 
Jakob, C. PP. S., who remained until June 1899. Rev. Charles 
Notheis, C. PP. S., was pastor for three months only, from 
June till September 1899. Rev. Thomas Meyer, C. PP. S., 
has been the pastor of St. Augustine's Church, since September 
1899. 

During Father Meyer's pastorate a two-story, brick school- 
house was built, arid was dedicated in August, 1903, by Bishop 
Alerding and was opened in September, of the same year, 
with an attendance of about sixty-seven children. The Sisters 
of the Most Precious Blood have charge of the school. In July 
1905 the six lots adjoining the church property were bought 
for |3,500. The house on one of these lots is now the Sisters' 
residence. The church grounds comprise an entire block. 



The Churches, Continued. 365 

The church property has a debt of |1,000. The congregation 
has 109 famihes, numbering 562 souls. Sixty-one children 
attend the school, taught by two Sisters. Two hundred and 
seventy-three parishioners are members of one or other of the 
societies: The Christian Mothers', the St. Aloysius', St. Rose's, 
the Holy Childhood, the Catholic Foresters, and the Lady 
Foresters. 



HARTFORD CITY. 

ST. JOHN evangelist's CHURCH. 
1883. 

It appears, that Rev. John Ryan, residing at Lagro, visited 
Hartford City in the year 1856. He celebrated Mass, as did 
those priests who came after him up to the year 1883, in the 
homes of Daniel O'Connell, John Hollisey, Denis Noonan, John 
McManamon, Jerry and Patrick Kirby, Denis Shay, Jerry 
Cashman, John Collins, John Trant, John Hogan, Thomas 
Maxwell and John Dougherty. After Father Ryan, came Rev. 
Lawrence Lamoor, Rev. Martin Noll, Rev. William Schmidt, 
Rev. P. M. Frawley, Rev. Michael F. Kelly, Rev. James F. 
Twigg, Rev. Anthony Strueder and Rev. John Grogan. These 
priests were visiting, not resident pastors. 

Father Grogan, who attended Hartford City twice a month, 
built the first church, in 1883. It was a plain frame building, 
but it answered the needs of the poor and small congregation 
at that time. The discovery of natural gas brought many 
manufacturing interests to Hartford City, and also increased 
the number of Catholics there. Bishop Rademacher sent Rev. 
Charles Dhe to Hartford City, as its first resident pastor, in 
March 1894. He proceeded at once to build a pastoral resi- 
dence. The frame church was in a delapidated condition and 
stood in need of repairs and improvements. But it soon 
became apparent, that a new church must be built to accom- 
modate the congregation. In the fall of 1897 ground was 
broken for the foundation, and on April 24, 1898 the new 
church was dedicated, in the presence of several thousand 
visitors from the surrounding country. Pontifical Mass was 
celebrated by Bishop Rademacher, Rev. J. F. Delaney, of 
Fort Wayne, preaching the sermon. In the afternoon, the 



366 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Bishop administered the sacrament of confirmation to forty- 
two persons. 

The present St. John's Church is a brick structure, of 
Gothic architecture, the spire rising to a height of 100 feet. 
The seating capacity is 350. The ground, on which the church 
and the other buildings stand, comprises one-half of a block. 
On this ground stand St. John's Church, the Holy Family 
School, the pastoral residence and the Sisters' house. The 
school was erected in 1904 costing, inclusive of furnishings, 
|8,000. It is a two-story building, 60x60 feet, with four 
school-rooms and will accommodate 160 children. Three 
Sisters of Providence have charge of the school, attended by 
118 children, and the usual eight grades are being taught. 
They reside in the house erected by Father Dhe, upon his 
arrival in Hartford City, in 1894. The present pastoral resi- 
dence was erected, by Father Dhe, in 1904, costing, every- 
thing included, |6,000. 

St. John's has ninety-two families, numbering 436 souls. 
The amount of indebtedness on the church property at the 
present time is |7,800. 

Rev. Charles Dhe had charge of Hartford City and its 
mission, from March 1894 to July 11, 1906, since which date 
the Rev. John F. Noll is the resident pastor. Since his advent 
to the parish he has made a number of repairs and improve- 
ments, amounting to several hundred dollars. 

The societies of the parish are: The Holy Name Society, 
for married and single men, now being organized; the Altar 
Society, for married women, sixty-six members; the Sodality 
of the Blessed Virgin, for single women and girls, fifty-two 
members; the Holy Angels' Society, for children, sixty-three 
members; St. Aloysius' Society, for boys, sixteen members; 
and a Dramatic Club. 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. Mary's church. 

1883. 



There were some German Catholic families living in South 
Bend, as early as 1850. They attended Mass at Notre Dame, 
and later at St. Joseph's Church on the East side of St. Joseph's 



The Churches, Continued. 367 

river. When St. Patrick's Church was built on West Division 
street, the Germans contributed tTDwards it and worshipped 
there. The Rev. Joseph Carrier, C. S. C, was probably the 
first priest to preach to the German Catholics in their mother 
tongue, at St. Patrick's Church. Several attempts were made, 
at different times, to organize and form a German parish, but 
for various reasons these efforts were unsuccessful. While 
attending St. Patrick's Church, the German Catholics organized 
the St. John's Benevolent Society, on March 25, 1879. This 
society induced Bishop Dwenger, to secure for the German 
Catholics the services of Rev. Paul Kolopp, C. S. C, a newly 
ordained priest, who, having charge of the German Catholic 
element, resided with the pastor of St. Patrick's Church. He 
came as such in June 1880, but remained only for a short time. 

At last, in February 1882, the Rev. Peter Johannes, 
C. S. C, was appointed the first regular pastor for the Germans 
in South Bend. The ground, on which St. Mary's Church 
stands, measures 99x221 feet, and was bought in July 1882, 
for the sum of |2,100. On August 22, 1883, the corner-stone 
was laid for the new church, which was given the name of the 
Assumption Church. The first services were held in it on 
Christmas, 1883, and Bishop Dwenger solemnly dedicated it, 
on May 11, 1884. It is a plain frame structure, 76x36 feet, 
with a sacristy on the rear and cost about |4,500. The cupola 
on the church has a small bell in it, but an extra bell tower 
was erected, near the sacristy, for a large bell donated by 
George Dotterwick. The congregation, at this time, consisted 
of about fifty families. 

A school was opened in the sacristy of the church, in 
January 1884, with an attendance of twenty-seven children. 
The accommodations being insufficient a one-story frame 
building, 25x50 feet, was erected and ready for use by Novem- 
ber, 1884. In the summer of 1891, another story was added 
to this building, thus affording four class-rooms, with accom- 
modations for about 240 children. Sisters of the Holy Cross 
have been teaching the school, from the beginning. 

In the mean time, the church had been fitted up with 
three Gothic altars, different statues, pews and a small gallery 
with a reed organ. A Redemptorist Father gave the first 
mission in this church in September, 1886. One night, during 



368 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the mission, a dreadful hail storm swept over South Bend, 
and destroyed every window on the north side of St. Mary's 
Church; and the rain fell in such torrents, that the people 
could not leave the church, till two o'clock in the morning. 
Since 1888, a number of Hungarians settled in South Bend, 
and Father Johannes took special interest in their spiritual 
welfare, until a parish of their own was organized. 

Up to August 1895, Father Johannes resided with the 
pastor of St. Patrick's Church; but it was then determined to 
purchase the house and lot adjoining St. Mary's Church, for a 
pastoral residence. The lot measures 50x221 feet, the house 
is a one-story frame building, with six rooms and both cost 
|3,000. A kitchen and bath-room have been added since. 
In the course of time, a hot air furnace was put in the church, 
sewer connections were made for the house and school, and 
the streets improved. Extensive improvements however were 
made in 1903, in preparation for the Silver Jubilee of Father 
Johannes; stained glass windows, two large chandeliers, a new 
pipe organ, redecoration of the church, painting of all the 
buildings, interior renovation of the parochial residence — all 
this was done and paid for. 

The Silver Jubilee of the beloved pastor took place on 
October 12, 1903, and it was a great day ever memorable in 
the history of the parish. But Providence abruptly terminated 
the useful life of Father Johannes, for on the night of October 
27, 1904, having suffered a stroke of apoplexy, he was found 
dead in his bed in the morning. His successor. Rev. J. M. 
Scherer, C. S. C, took charge of St. Mary's Church on All 
Saints day 1904, and has continued to be its pastor to the 
present time. He found the congregation indebted, to the 
amount of $2,600. He found also that many repairs had to 
be made necessitating an outlay of |300, leaving a balance at 
the end of 1905 of less than |2,000 indebtedness. In 1906 
the gallery of the church was enlarged, to accommodate the 
children. The seating capacity of the church is 425. The 
present debt on the church property is |1,700. The number 
of souls is about 800, or 190 families. 

Societies of the parish are: The Sacred Heart Altar 
Society for Married Ladies; the Young Ladies Sodality; the 
Guardian Angel Society; the St. John's Benevolent Society; 



The Churches, Continued. 369 

the Catholic Knights of America; the Uniformed Rank C. K. 
of A. ; the St. Aloysius Young Mens' Society. The aggregate 
membership is 346. Three boys of the parish have become 
priests and two girls sisters. 

The parochial school is conducted by four Sisters of the 
Holy Cross, with an attendance of 153 pupils. 



TERRE COUPEE. 

ST. STANISLAUS' CHURCH. 

i; 



The emigration of Polish Catholic settlers in Terre Coupee, 
and the surrounding country, began in about 1870, in con- 
sequence of Russian and Prussian persecution in Poland. As 
a station Terre Coupee was visited by Rev. Valentine Czy- 
zewski, C. S. C, Rev. F, X. Szulak, S. J., and Rev. Ludwig 
Madgzicki, C. R., celebrating Mass in the woods and in log 
cabins. 

The first church was a small frame structure, 60x30 feet, 
built by Father Czyzewski in 1884, at a cost of $1,800. As a 
mission, Terre Coupee was attended once a month by priests 
residing, either at Notre Dame, or South Bend. The names of 
Rev. Alexander Kirsch, C. S. C, Michael Lauth, C. S. C, Rev. 
V. Czyzewski, C. S. C, appear on the records. The first resi- 
dent pastor of Terre Coupee was Rev. W. Zborowski, during 
whose pastorate, in 1888, one and a half acres of ground were 
purchased for |185.50. He was succeeded by Rev. George 
Kolesinski from January 1894 until May 1, 1901, when Rev. 
Alexander Buechler took charge and is the pastor at the present 
time. During his pastorate, in 1903, the present church was 
commenced and was dedicated, in 1906. It is built in the 
Gothic style of architecture, has Gothic altars, confessional, 
pulpit, altar-railing and pews. The cost of the church was a 
little less than |23,000. The seating capacity is 460. 

The old church was used also as a school for fifteen years, 
the Blessed Sacrament being removed to the sacristy during 
school hours. Since the erection of the new church, the old 
church is used for school purposes exclusively. When Terre 



370 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Coupee was a mission, Brothers of the Holy Cross taught the 
school. At present one lay-teacher has charge of seventy- 
three pupils. 

The priest's house wa§ built in 1888, by Father Zborowski 
and has been improved by Father Buechler, by the installation 
of an electric light plant, which gives light also to the church 
and school. The church property has a debt of |8,000. The 
congregation numbers about 538 souls, or 139 families. 

St. Stanislaus' Parish has the St. Stanislaus Kostka's 
Society, for the Men, since 1901; the Sacred Heart League, 
since 1890, for the Married Women, and the Young Ladies' 
Sodality, since 1902; with an aggregate membership of 136. 
The mission Rolling Prairie is attended from Terre Coupee 
every Sunday. 



WANATAH. 

MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD CHURCH. 

1887. 

The Church of the Most Precious Blood, in Wanatah, 
was established in the year 1887. The number of souls at 
that time was about thirty families, four-fifths German and 
one-fifth Irish. Prior to 1887, these Catholics were members 
of St. Martin's Church, at Schimmels. Rev. Dominic Shunk, 
C. PP. S., was made the first pastor in June, 1887, and remained 
until February 1897. The present church was built by him, 
and dedicated by Bishop Dwenger on November 12, 1887. It 
is a frame structure, 35x80 feet, with a seating capacity of 
about 350. It was built at an outlay of $6,000. In 1888, 
Father Shunk built a large frame school-house, with which a 
residence for the Sisters was connected, at a cost of |2,500. 
The Sisters, C. PP. S., had charge of the school up to June 
1904, when the school was discontinued, the attendance of 
pupils at the time being only about sixteen. In the same 
year. Father Shunk built the priest's house, for |1,800. During 
Father Shunk's pastorate, Schimmels, SanPierre, Walkerton, 
Westville, Hamlet, Wheatfield, North Judson were missions 
and Knox a station, attended from Wanatah. 



The Churches, Continued. 371 

The second pastor was Rev. Edward Jakob, C. PP. S., 
having charge also of Schimmels, Walkerton, and Hamlet, 
The third pastor was Rev. Raymond Vernimont, C. PP. S., 
from September 22, 1897 to September 8, 1898, having charge 
of the same missions. On September 8, 1898, Bishop Rade- 
macher appointed Rev. Adam M. Buchheit pastor at Wanatah, 
with Schimmels, Walkerton and Hamlet for missions. He 
remained until November 21, 1906, being transferred to St. 
John, in Lake county. Rev. John Rech had charge of 
Wanatah and its mission Schimmels, till June 8, 1907, when 
Rev. John Oberholz was appointed pastor. 

Until 1887, Rev. Michael O'Reilly of Valpairaso said 
Mass once a month, on week days, at Wanatah in Patrick 
Lyons' house for the Irish Catholics living at Wanatah. 

The church grounds comprise forty-three and a half acres. 
Two acres of this were donated by the Hon. M. Tucker a non- 
Catholic, on which to build a church, but on the day of the 
dedication of the church, November 12, 1887, the same gen- 
erous gentleman donated the other forty and a half acres. The 
lot opposite the church, used for a hitching place, was donated 
by Roman Cruse, a member of the congregation. David 
Condon gave $300 for the erection of a school. The debt at 
present is |2,250. The number of families is forty-two, aggre- 
gating 194 souls. 

The Church Societies are: the Apostleship of Prayer, 
established 1905; the Young Ladies' Sodality of the Immacu- 
late Conception, March 13, 1905; the Christian Mothers', Octo- 
ber 1901; and the Archconfraternity of the Most Precious 
Blood, with a membership of 154, October 27, 1901. Six 
girls of the parish became members of three different sister- 
hoods. 

The mission Schimmels is attended from Wanatah. 



CHAPTER XIII. 



THE CHURCHES — CONTINUED 

1888-1897 

HAMMOND, ST. CASIMIR'S — EAST CHICAGO, ST. MARY'S — FORT 

WAYNE, ST. Patrick's — whiting — Michigan city, st. 

STANISLAUS' — GAS CITY — ALEXANDRIA — DUNKIRK — EAST 
CHICAGO, ST. STANISLAUS' — LAFAYETTE, ST. LAWRENCE'S — 
SOUTH BEND, SACRED HEART — HUNTINGTON, ST. MARY'S — 
HAMMOND, ST. JOHN BAPTIST's. 



HAMMOND. 

ST. casimir's church. 
1890. 

In 1890, Rev. U. Raszkiewicz, of Otis, assisted by an 
active committee of eight, undertook the task of forming the 
St. Casimir's Congregation, which consists exclusively of Polish 
Catholics. At that time it was composed of about fifty families 
and a few single persons. Six lots were bought at $300 each, 
and two lots were donated. A frame building of 90x46 feet, 
was erected at a cost of $10,000. This building was to serve 
the purposes of church, school and priest's residence. The 
first resident pastor was Rev. C. Kobylinski, now of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, under whose pastoral administration the debt on 
the church property was reduced to $800. 

The present pastor, Rev. P. A. Kahellek took charge of 
the congregation on July 2, 1897, He paid off the remaining 
debt, and made many necessary improvements. St, Casimir's 
enjoys the distinction of having the first pipe organ of any 
church in Hammond. The main altar was remodeled, two 
side altars were added, as well as confessional and other orna- 
ments of the sanctuary, at a cost of $2,000. Father Kahellek 
also bought an additional lot for $300. The long benches 
were replaced by modern school desks, and the necessary school 



The Churches, Continued. 373 

supplies furnished. An additional school-room was prepared, 
and the eighty children were taught by two female lay-teachers 
until 1901, when the Sisters of St. Francis of Lafayette took 
charge. At the present time the attendance is 137, taught by 
three Sisters. The Sisters reside in the rooms formerly occupied 
by the pastor. 

The pastoral residence, a commodious brick building, was 
erected in 1901, at a cost of $3,000. In 1905, the church was 
frescoed. The debt on the church property is $2,400. St. 
Casimir's Parish has 114 families, or 597 souls. The societies 
are: St. Joseph's Society for married men, thirty-two mem- 
bers; the Rosary Society for married wornen, fifteen members; 
St. Aloysius' Society for single men, nineteen members; the 
Rosary Society for single women, fifteen members; the Guardian 
Angels' Society for children, seventy-eight members. 



EAST CHICAGO. 

ST. Mary's church. 

1890. 

East Chicago was founded in the year 1889. The Rev. 
H. M. Plaster, of St. Joseph's Church at Hammond, offered 
the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, for the first time in East Chicago, 
in the Todd Opera House and continued to do so until the 
church was completed, in the fall of 1890. At that time East 
Chicago had from thirty-five to forty Catholic families. The 
Land Company donated six lots, and the parish bought three 
more for $900, and in the year 1902 the Rev. George Lauer 
bought five additional lots, at a cost of $2,000, which gives the 
church property a frontage on three streets, Forsyth Avenue, 
One Hundred Forty-Fourth street, and Magoun Avenue. 

A frame church was built and completed in the fall of the 
year 1890. The architecture is Gothic and the building with 
its furnishings cost $3,500. The condition of the parish and 
church, as we find it in 1890, continued practically for ten 
years, owing to the small number of people who belonged to 
the parish. The priests who had charge of it during this time 
were: Rev. H. M. Plaster 1890, from Hammond; Rev. John 
Tremmel, assistant, attended a short time; Rev. F. G. Lentz, 
attended four months till January 26, 1891; Rev. M. J. Byrne, 



374 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

till 1894 from Whiting; Rev. F. Koslowski, from 1894 till 1898, 
from Hammond; Rev. H. C. Kappel, assistant at Hammond, 
attended from the fall of 1898 till March 1899; Rev. George 
Lauer, pastor since March 1899. 

When Father Lauer took charge, he found the property 
in a dilapidated condition, with a debt of $2,700. He made 
the necessary repairs and added a sanctuary with two sac- 
risties to the church, increasing the seating capacity to 256. 
The whole interior of the church was furnished and decorated, 
adding two new side altars. In 1901, Father Lauer built a 
two-story frame school-house, with four rooms, to accommodate 
200 children, at a cost of |3,200. The Sisters of Providence 
of St. Mary-of-the- Woods have charge and the usual grades 
are taught. The first priest's house, a one-story eight-room 
frame building, erected in 1899 for $2,000, is now occupied by 
the Sisters. The house, occupied at present by the pastor, is 
a substantial and commodious two-story building, erected in 
1902, at an expense of $5,550. 

The debt on the church property is $10,800. The number 
of souls is 550, consisting of 122 families, and the number of 
children, attending school, is 220, taught by four Sisters of 
Providence. 

St. Mary's Parish has the Young Ladies' Sodality, organ- 
ized in 1899; the Rosary Society, in 1900; the Purgatorian 
Society, 1901; the Sacred Heart League, in 1902; the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, in 1899; the Ancient Order of Hibernians, 
1902, and the L. A. O. H., in 1904; the Holy Angels' Sodality; 
the Women Catholic Order of Foresters. The total member- 
ship of these organizations is 510. 



FORT WAYNE. 

ST. Patrick's church. 

1890. 



In the year 1886, a school was opened in what was known 
as "The Bond Building." It was established for children, 
who, on account of the distance, could not attend the Cathedral 
School. The opening of this school of two rooms may be con- 
sidered the beginning of St. Patrick's parish. 



The Churches, Continued. 375 

In 1889 Bishop Dwenger bought four lots on Fairfield 
avenue, from Peter Owens, whose' dwelling house was con- 
verted into a school of four rooms. In September, of the 
same year, the pupils were transferred from "The Bond Build- 
ing" to these new quarters, henceforth known as "St. Patrick's 
School." In October, 1889, Bishop Dwenger formed the new 
congregation of St. Patrick's, and gave them the Rev. Thomas 
M. O'Leary, as pastor. 

Bishop Dwenger was prevailed upon to locate the new 
church where it now stands, but, before the lots could be 
secured. Father O'Leary died within three weeks after his 
appointment. A month later Bishop Dwenger donated the 
property on Fairfield avenue to the new congregation and 
appointed the Rev. Joseph F. Delaney pastor, to succeed 
Father O'Leary. 

Four lots of the present site had been secured in the mean 
time, and Father Delaney at once purchased the two remaining 
lots, thus completing the half square fronting on Dewald street. 
In 1905 Father Delaney secured the seventh lot opposite the 
church. 

The corner-stone of the new St. Patrick's Church was 
laid on May 20, 1890, by Bishop Dwenger, and on November 
22, 1891, the church was dedicated by the Vicar General, 
Father Brammer. The church is of Gothic design, 167 feet in 
length, with a frontage of ninety-four feet. The spire rises to 
a height of 185 feet. The interior decorations are beautiful, 
the furnishings complete in every detail, and the seating 
capacity is 800. The total cost, including furnishings, was 
$59,000. 

The school, with nine large well equipped school-rooms, 
and an assembly hall, was built in 1891. The building is 
85x72 feet and affords room for more than 500 pupils. The 
cost was $14,500. Improvements were made on it in 1887, 
and again in 1890, aggregating an additional cost of $2,000. 
The Sisters of Providence, from St. Mary-of-the-Woods, have 
had charge of the school from the beginning. The number of 
teachers has increased from six to sixteen, and the number of 
pupils from 175 to 480. Eight grades are taught in the paro- 
chial school; but in 1901, at a cost of $14,000, Father Delaney 
erected St. Catharine's Academy, adjoining the school, wherein 



376 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

a High-school and a Commercial Course for the pupils, desiring 
to fit themselves for a business career, are being conducted. 

The original parochial residence, erected in 1891 at a cost, 
of |3,800, having become too small, was remodeled and en- 
larged, in 1906, at a cost of |1 1,000. Th lot opposite the 
church, on Harrison street, will at a later date have on it a 
Parish Hall. The church property is out of debt, and has a 
cash balance of |3,000 in the treasury. 

St. Patrick's Church has Sodalities for married men, with 
223 members, for young men, with 206 members, and for boys, 
with ninety-two members; and it has Sodalities for young 
women, with 268 members, and for girls, with 306 members, 
together with a Living Rosary Society, with 430 members, and 
the Guardian Angel Society, with 306 members. Benevolent 
organizations of the parish are: St. Joseph's Society, Indiana 
League, with thirty-seven members, the Ladies' Catholic Benev- 
olent Association, with ninety members, and the Ladies' 
Auxiliary A. O. H. with seventy-three members. The above 
Sodalities and Church Societies, aside from the spiritual pur- 
poses for which they were organized, are also a great help to 
the pastor in the work of up-building the parish. 

The parish has 476 families. The number of souls is 
2064. Six boys of the parish have become priests, and twenty- 
three girls have entered religious communities. George P. 
Gordon deserves special mention since through his devoted- 
ness and energy all the original church property of St. Patrick's 
was acquired. 

The assistant priests at St. Patrick's Church, in the order 
given, were: Revs. Edward F. Barrett, Frederick Dandurand, 
Patrick J. Crawley, Thomas A. Mungovan, Rev. Edward J. 
Mungovan, and Rev. James Durham, since June 8, 1907. 



WHITING. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1891. 



The Rev. M. J. Byrne visited Whiting, from East Chicago, 
for the first time on February 1, 1891. He found there a con- 
gregation of about twenty families, and some 100 single men. 



The Churches, Continued. 377 

clamoring for a church. Prior to this, Rev. F. H. Joseph 
Kroll had visited Whiting, and had started a subscription Hst 
with about fifty names on it, and had secured five lots on 
Center street, one of them donated by Colonel Forsyth and 
the other four bought for |400 each. Father Byrne bought 
five additional lots, at the same price. Ground for the new 
church was broken on March 19, 1891. The church was 50x35 
feet. It received a Main Altar and two side Altars, and was 
ready for dedication, which took place on May 24, 1891, the 
Vicar General, Father Brammer, officiating. Before Whiting 
had a church. Father Kroll, from Chesterton, had celebrated 
Mass for the first time in a pavilion, and after that in a school- 
house in Oklahoma, and in a hall over Green's saloon. In 
September, 1891, Father Byrne erected the new Orient Hall, 
which was destroyed by fire on March 31, 1897, the pastor 
settling with the insurance company for $762. Statues of the 
Blessed Virgin and St. Joseph were provided in 1891, and in 
September, 1892, the Vicar General, Father Brammer, blessed 
a 1000 pound bell, naming it St. Matthias. Confirmation was 
administered for the first time in Whiting by Bishop Rade- 
macher of Nashville, on October 16, 1892. 

The parochial school was opened on September 3, 1895, 
in the old Orient Hall which had in it two school-rooms. The 
Sisters of Providence of St. Mary-of-the- Woods had charge. 
The attendance on the first day was 150 children. After the 
destruction of the Orient Hall by fire in 1897, Father Byrne 
built a two-story, brick school-house, with three large school- 
rooms on the first floor, and a large hall on the second. At 
the same time a two-story frame building was erected for the 
Sisters' dwelling. And, also was built, a two-story brick 
structure with all the modern improvements, for a pastoral 
residence. . Father Byrne was removed from Whiting, in August 
1898, and was succeeded by Rev. Charles Thiele. The new 
pastor found Whiting to consist of a floating population; and 
the church property was indebted to the amount of $9,265. 
During his pastorate, he built an addition to the church, 
bought ten new lots for a church site costing |2,500, and re- 
duced the debt to $6,500. On July 1, 1905, Father Thiele 
was succeeded by Rev. John B. Berg. 

Whiting has 165 Catholic famihes, numbering 782 souls. 



378 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

The parochial school, taught by five Sisters of Providence, has 
an attendance of 177 children. The debt on the church prop- 
erty is |6,500. 

The church Societies' are: The Rosary Society, thirty- 
eight members; St. John's, thirty members; St. Mary's, sixteen 
members; the Children of Mary, forty members. Other 
organizations are: The Catholic Order of Foresters and 
Ladies' Auxiliary of same; and the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, with the Ladies' Auxiliary of the same. 



II 



MICHIGAN CITY. 

ST. STANISLAUS' CHURCH. 
1892. 

In 1890, the Polish Catholic population of Michigan City 
numbered about ninety famiUes. Until their church was 
completed towards the middle of 1892, St. Mary's Hall was 
fitted up as a chapel for their use. Rev. E. J. Wrobel was 
appointed their pastor, on January 15, 1891. He resided with 
the pastor of St. Mary's Church, from July 1890 until a resi- 
dence was provided for him, at St. Stanislaus' Church. The 
two-story building, enlarged in 1906, serves the purposes of 
church, school and Sisters' residence. The priest's house is a 
comfortable, two-story brick building. 

•*M The parish has 426 families, numbering 2050 souls. The 
parochial school has an attendance of 353 children, and is 
conducted by School Sisters of Notre Dame. 

St. Hedwig, St. Stanislaus and St. Casimir's Societies, for 
married men, have 439 members; the Rosary Society, for 
married women, has 145 members; St. Joseph's Society, for 
single men, has 125 members; the Rosary Society, for single 
women, has 110 members; the Sacred Heart Society, for chil- 
dren, has 100 members. 

The indebtedness of the church property is |14,000. Rev. 
Anthony Stachowiak was the assistant at St. Stanislaus' 
Church, from May, 1902 till June 22, 1906, on which day he 
was transferred to Indiana Harbor, and was succeeded as 
assistant, at Michigan City, by Rev. John Kasprzykowski. 
Father Wrobel, since November 1906, has been sojourning in 
the South, to recuperate his health. 



It: 



The Churches, Continued. 379 

GAS CITY. 

ST. Genevieve's church. 
1893. 

The first Mass in Gas City was celebrated in the Barracks 
of the United States Glass Company, in 1892. The church 
property consists of seven lots, located on North A street, was 
donated by the Gas City Land Company, in 1893. The church 
building is a frame structure erected in 1893. The pastoral ' 
residence is a commodious brick building built in 1894. The 
Rev. F. C. Wiechmann was the first resident pastor until 
December 15, 1905, the date of his death. There is no debt 
on the church property, with over |3,000 in the treasury, 
intended for the erection of a new church. Gas City has 
seventy-three Catholic families, numbering 316 souls. The 
parish has the Rosary Society, for married women, with thirty- 
eight members; the St. Genevieve's Society, for single women, 
with twenty members; the Holy Name Society, for boys, with 
twenty-five members, and the Sodality of the Children of Mary, 
for girls, with twenty members. 

The pastor of St. Genevieve's Church, at Gas City is also 
the chaplain of the Marion Branch of the National Soldiers' 
Home, located about two miles from Gas City. Until 1894 
this mission, under the patronage of St. Ignatius, was regularly 
visited by the pastors of Marion; but in that year Father 
Wiechmann was appointed chaplain, having his residence at 
Gas City. For several years Mass was celebrated in the base- 
ment of Barracks number one. The present beautiful chapel 
was erected by the Government, in 1899. The following 
General Orders Number Twenty, was issued December 16, 
1905, by Governor G. W. Steele: 

"The death of Father Frederick C. Wiechmann, Chaplain 
of this Branch, at his home in Gas City, December 15th, is 
announced with profound sorrow. He was an agreeable com- 
panion, cheerful of disposition, and a Christian gentleman. 
He performed the duties of Chaplain to the entire satisfaction 
of the members of the Home, from February 10, 1894, until 
he became so severely afflicted as to be unable to do so. He 
bore his long and severe affliction with patience and hopeful 
resignation. His loss will be sincerely mourned by all good 



380 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

people who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. The flag 
will be displayed at half-mast until after the funeral, on the 
19th, instant." 

The present pastor and chaplain of the Soldiers' Home is 
Rev. Charles E. McCabe, who was appointed on January 4, 
1906. St. Ignatius' Chapel at the Soldiers' Home is attended 
on all Sundays, Fridays and Holydays of obhgation. 



ALEXANDRIA. 

ST. mary's church. 

1896. 

In the year 1870 Alexandria was a village of 300 inhabi- 
tants, and, of these, eight souls were Catholic, of Irish descent. 
The construction of two railroads, crossing at Alexandria, 
increased the number of Catholics to about thirty. At this 
time. Rev. John B. Crawley, located at Anderson, paid his 
first visit to this village. The first Mass was celebrated by 
him here, in an old log house, on East Washington street. 
With nothing but the conveyances of those days at his disposal, 
and the use of even these very limited on account of the slender 
support that could be given priests in those days, the trips 
from Anderson to Alexandria entailed many hardships. But 
Father Crawley continued his visits at intervals of two or 
three months, until about 1882. By this time, railroad facilities 
had increased to such an extent, that access to Anderson was 
made much easier, and Father Crawley's work in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Anderson so much more onerous, that he 
discontinued his visits to Alexandria. The discovery of natural 
gas, in 1891, brought various manufacturing industries to 
.Alexandria, and these brought with them a new influx of 
Catholics. Rev. B. Biegel, located at Elwood, visited Alex- 
andria in his pastoral capacity, for the first time, in the spring 
of 1892, celebrating Mass in a private house. After that ser- 
vices were held, once a month on Sunday, in the Commercial 
Hall, which was soon changed to "Tammany Hall," until 
services could be held in their own church. Bad weather and 
the hardships of a ten mile drive did not prevent Father Biegel 
from making the stated visits. The congregation, at that time, 
numbered about fifty families. Funds were continually col- 



The Churches, Continued. 381 

lected to secure church accommodations. Through the kindly 
influence of W. C. Depauw, over the various land companies, 
a site of five lots was secured on the corner of Belmont 
avenue and Madison street, in April, 1893. The congregation 
having increased to sixty-five families, it was deemed necessary 
that a pastor should be located at Alexandria. On June 8, 
1893, Rev. John B. Berg was appointed pastor at Alexandria, 
but, for the time being, resided at Elwood. The sum of |600 
had been collected by Father Biegel, and on July 9, 1893, 
Father Berg contracted for the foundation of the new structure, 
for the sum of $950. The foundation having been completed, 
the panic of 1893 came' upon the country, and affected Alex- 
andria to such an extent, that the work of continuing the 
building was out of the question. Bishop Rademacher deemed 
it expedient, in October 1893, to assign Father Berg to another 
field of labor. 

Father Biegel took up the work again, visiting Alexandria 
regularly, until December 1895, when Bishop Rademacher 
deemed it advisable to give Alexandria a pastor. Rev. Joachim 
Baker was appointed, and held services for the first time on 
January 12, 1896, in Tammany Hall. He began, at once, to 
reside at Alexandria in a rented house, and in this house a 
chapel was arranged for the daily Mass. A small altar was 
purchased, and the crate, in which it had been shipped, was 
converted into a vestment case; and a few small benches were 
adapted to the room. In this chapel regular services were 
held, the sacraments administered and the Blessed Sacrament 
kept until the church was completed. 

In June, 1896, Father Baker saw his way clear for giving 
the contract for a two-story brick structure, 35x65 feet, with a 
wing, for a consideration of $7,000. The second floor, of this 
building, was to be used for church purposes, whilst a part of 
the first floor was arranged for school-rooms, and the other 
part for the Sisters' residence. The building, when completed, 
was placed under the patronage of the Blessed Mother of God. 
The first services were held, in the new building, on the 6th 
day of December. The Rev. A. B. Oechtering of Mishawaka 
presented the new St. Mary's parish with the pews of his old 
St. Joseph's Church, together with the Stations of the Cross. 

Until the opening of the school, Father Baker occupied 



382 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the resident part of the building. Three School Sisters of 
Notre Dame accepted the charge of the school, and it was 
opened on September 13, 1897, with an enrollment of eighty 
pupils. At the end of the first school year, however, 120 
children were in attendance. On September 19th, Bishop 
Rademacher visited Alexandria, to dedicate the new building, 
and to administer the sacrament of Confirmation. 

Upon the arrival of the Sisters, Father Baker again lived 
in a rented house. In September, 1898, the priest's house was 
begun and completed in April, 1899, at a cost of |4,000. Five 
additional lots, directly north of the present site, were pur- 
chased in the fall of 1899. Three years had elapsed, and the 
school accommodations were found to be inadequate, and 
accordingly a two-story brick addition, 48x48 feet, at a cost 
of |6,000, was erected in the spring of 1900. The school 
building, at present, has five school-rooms and an attendance 
of 209 pupils. The eight grades are taught, by six Sisters. 

The church property covers a half block, and the grounds 
are being well cared for, by ornamentations, such as trees, 
shrubbery, flowers and lawn. The church property has a 
debt of $8,862 on it. The Rosary and Altar Societies, aside 
from their spiritual purpose, have supplied the church with 
vestments and other articles. The Sodality of the Blessed 
Virgin for young women, and the Children of Mary, have pro- 
vided a library; whilst the St. Aloysius' Society for young men 
has done equally good service. The St. Cecilia's Men Choir is 
making earnest efforts to comply with the Holy Father's "Motu 
Proprio," on Church Music. St. Mary's Congregation numbers 
210 families, with 1024 souls. 



DUNKIRK. 

ST. Mary's church. 

1896. 

In 1853, Dunkirk was called Quincy. In 1869, it began 
to be visited by priests from Union City and Portland. From 
1869 till 1896 Dunkirk was a station, visited by the following 
priests: Rev. Lawrence Lamoor, from 1869 till 1870, from 
Union City; Rev. John Bleckmann, from May 1870 for nine 
months, assistant at Union City; Rev. Frederick Von Schwedler, 



The Churches, Continued. 383 

from 1871 to 1872, from Union City; Rev. Martin F. Noll, 
from 1872 to 1875, from Union Ci'ty; Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan, 
from 1875 till 1888, from Union City; Rev. Joachim^Baker, 
from 1888 till 1891, from Portland; Rev. Anthony J. Strueder, 
from October 1891 till October 25, 1894, from Portland; Rev. 
Charles Dhe, from 1894 till March 1900, from Hartford City; 
Rev. William S. Hogan, from March 1900 till September 7, 
1902, was the first resident pastor; and Rev. John C. Wakefer 
is the second resident pastor, since September 7, 1902. 

Father Dhe, for two years when visiting Dunkirk, cele- 
brated Mass in the Opera House. The number of souls at that 
time was about 100. In 1896, the first and present church 
was erected by Father Dhe. Its dimensions are 40x60 feet; 
it is of brick, on a stone foundation, has two steeples, and is 
constructed after the Gothic style of architecture. The cost 
of the building was |6,000. 

In March of 1900, Dunkirk ceased to be a mission by 
receiving its first resident pastor, in the person of Rev. William 
S. Hogan. He spent two years and a half here, paying off the 
greater part of the debt. He also had charge of Red Key and 
Albany. The present pastor. Rev. John C. Wakefer, took 
charge September 7, 1902. His first work was to pay off the 
remaining debt of |1,000. In 1904, the church was frescoed 
for $280, a chandelier and electric lights were put in for |200. 
Having provided the sanctuary and sacristy with many neces- 
saries, including a baptismal font, he bought a bell, weighing 
1535 pounds, which was blessed September 4, 1906. In 
October, of the same year, he installed a steam heating plant 
for church and house, costing $1,160, put a new roof on the 
church, repaired the house, put down cement side walks, and 
enclosed the entire church property with a beautiful fence. 
The seating capacity of the church is about 250. 

With the exception of one lot, the church grounds consist 
of a whole block, on the west side of Broad street, in the south- 
eastern part of the town. The fifth lot of ground, having on 
it a two-story house, was bought for $825. This house is the 
priest's residence. The number of souls is 240, consisting of 
fifty-two families. 

St. Mary's Church has an Altar Society, organized Jan- 
uary 1, 1903, with thirty-five members, which has charge of 



384 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

the sanctuary. This society secured the money to buy the 
church bell, the largest and best bell in Dunkirk. The Young 
Ladies' Sodality, organized on December 8, 1906, has twenty- 
two members. The Young' Men's Society has nineteen mem- 
bers. The debt on the church property is |2,200. 

The pastor at Dunkirk visits the mission, Red Key, on the 
first Sunday of each month. 



EAST CHICAGO. 

ST. STANISLAUS' CHURCH. 
1896. 

St. Stanislaus' Congregation, consisting of Polish Catholics 
exclusively, was visited from 1888 till 1900 by the pastors of 
St. Casimir's Church in Hammond; namely. Rev. Casimir 
Kobylinski and Rev. Peter Kahellek. In 1896 Father Koby- 
linski secured six lots, on Baring avenue and One Hundred 
and Fiftieth street. The first church, a frame structure, 80x30 
feet, was erected in the same year, under the supervision of 
the same Father. It was placed under the patronage of St. 
Michael, the Archangel. The number of souls at this time was 
about 200. 

The present church grounds were secured by Rev. John 
Kubacki in 1901, having an area of one block, 225x296 feet, 
fronting on Magoun and Forsyth avenues, and One Hundred 
and Fiftieth street. Additional five lots, 25x140 feet each, 
are located on Forsyth avenue. These grounds were secured 
by Father Kubacki, in 1901, at a cost of about $20,000. The 
church which stood on Baring avenue was removed to its 
present site, after which it was known as St. Stanislaus' Church. 
Rev. Joseph Bolka took charge in November, 1904. At a cost 
of |1,500 he built an addition, 36x30 feet, to the church. The 
Rosary Society for women and St. Cecilia's choir, in 1907, 
donated two side altars, costing $240. At the present time 
the church is being frescoed for $300. A lot, situated some 
distance from the church, was donated for the benefit of the 
congregation, by the Bell and Hoffman Land Company. 

The building used for school purposes was erected by 
Father Kubacki in 1901. It is a two-story frame structure, 
22x64 feet, and cost about $1,800. It has four school-rooms 



The Churches, Continued. 385 

and can accommodate about 230 children. The parochial 
school is conducted in the six grades, by four Sisters of St. 
Francis, attended by 238 pupils. The residence occupied by 
the Sisters stood on the ground purchased in 1901, and is a 
one-and-a-half-story frame building, which probably cost about 
$1,000. In 1905 and 1906 Father Bolka expended an addi- 
tional |1,000 in repairs and improvements. 

The parochial residence also stood on the grounds pur- 
chased in 1901. It measures 22x56 feet, and its probable cost 
was |2,000. In 1905, Father Bolka improved and enlarged 
the building, at an expense of $2,000. The parish has 280 
families, numbering 1324 souls. The present indebtedness on 
the church property is $4,500. 

St. Stanislaus' Church has these societies: St. Michael's, 
for married men, 125 members; the Rosary Sodality, for 
married women, eighty members; St. Stanislaus Kostka's, for 
single men, eighteen members; the Rosary Sodality, for single 
women, forty-five members; the Infant Jesus, for children, 
183 hiembers; St. Stanislaus B. M., fifty members. 

On June 8, 1907 Rev. Julian Skrzypinski was given charge 
of St. Stanislaus', pro tem., during the absence of Father Bolka. 



I 



LAFAYETTE. 

ST. Lawrence's church. 

1896. 

The territory of St. Lawrence's Parish was formerly called 
Linwood and, in 1894, was incorporated with the city of Lafay- 
ette. The congregation was organized in 1895. The first 
building erected, in 1896, is a large two-story structure, two 
upper rooms of which are used for church purposes and the 
other for school-rooms. The cost of this building was $20,000. 
Before the organization of the parish, its members attended 
St. Mary's and St. Boniface's Churches, and consisted of about 
sixty-three families. Nine lots were bought in 1895, and one 
more in 1899, the ten lots costing $2,495.48. The Rev. Matthias 
Sasse, O. F. M., was the first pastor of the new St. Lawrence's 
Parish. Bishop Rademacher dedicated the church and school 



386 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

building, on November 8, 1896, when the Very Rev. P. Englert, 
O. F. M., celebrated the Mass and Rev. Chrysostom Theobald, 
O. F. M., preached both in English and in German. On the 
day of the dedication Father Sasse was removed, and Rev. 
Theodore Stephan, O. F. M., appointed in his place. The 
dimensions of the above building are 80x90 feet. The seating 
capacity of the church part, is 350. Three Sisters of St. 
Francis teach the school which has eight grades, and 125 
pupils. The Sisters reside in the south wing of the building. 

In 1898, a priest's house was erected for $2,000, and in 
the spring of 1906 a porch was added to it. The church prop- 
erty has a debt of |1 1,000 on it. The parochial school is a 
free school supported by a school society, to which every 
member of the parish belongs. It has a membership of 424. 
The school children have a Guardian Angels' Society. At 
present the number of souls is 763, or 135 families. 

Rev. Matthias Sasse, O. F. M., was the first pastor of St. 
Lawrence's Church, from November 19, 1895 until November 8, 
1896. The second pastor was Rev. Theodore Stephan, O. F. M., 
who, on account of ill health, had to be removed a few weeks 
after his appointment. The present pastor. Rev. Richard 
Wurth, O. F. M., has had charge of St. Lawrence's Church 
since December 23, 1896. 



SOUTH BEND. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1896. 

In the earlier days, the few Belgian families living in 
South Bend worshipped at St. Patrick's Church, whose pastor 
did for them what he could, and three or four times a year 
procured for them the services of Rev. J. Joos, a Belgian priest, 
from the diocese of Detroit. In 1896, the number of Belgian 
families had increased to fifty and the Rev. Henry A. Paanakker, 
C. S. C, a newly ordained priest, received the appointment as 
pastor of the Belgians, with instructions to organize a Belgian 
parish. He at once bought two lots of ground for $1,800, and 
on one of them he erected a two-story building, with a brick 



The Churches, Continued. 387 

basement, to serve the purposes of both church and school. 
This building was put up at an expense of |8,000. Father 
Paanakker, in the mean time, occupied one of the 9x12 feet 
sacristies, for his residence. Some time after he bought a 
two-story frame house, and moved it on the other lot for a 
priest's house, at a cost of |850. The location of the church 
property is in the residence portion of South Bend. 

The school is conducted by lay-teachers, having been 
taught at one time, for two years, by two Sisters of the Holy 
Cross. Father Paanakker's pastorate ceased with his death, 
on February 23, 1906. His succesosr Rev. Peter P. Klein, 
C. S. C, took charge of the parish on March 25, 1906, and 
with his advent new life and spirit was infused into the con- 
gregation. Necessary repairs and improvements were made 
on the church, school and priest's house, giving all the build- 
ings a fresh coat of paint, and enlarging the organ loft, so as 
to make room for the children. He also paid some of the debt. 
Father Klein departed this life October 6, 1906. The newly 
ordained priest Rev. Alphonse Just, C. S. C, was his successor 
and is the pastor at the present time. 

The Sacred Heart Parish has these societies: The St. 
Vincent de Paul's Society, for Married Men; the Holy Name 
Society, for Single Men; the Children of Mary, for the Single 
Women; the Altar Boys' Society and the Holy Angels' Society, 
for the children. At the present time the parish numbers 
about eighty families. The debt on the church property is 
about |5,000. 



HUNTINGTON. 

ST. mary's church. 

1897. 

St. Mary's Parish was established by Bishop Rademacher, 
on May 16, 1896, for the benefit of the English speaking por- 
tion of SS. Peter and Paul's Congregation. The Rev. John R. 
Quinlan, assistant at the Cathedral of Fort Wayne, was given 
charge of the new parish; but he continued to reside at the 
Cathedral, until the church was ready for dedication. The 
plans for St. Mary's Church were drawn up by architect Druid- 
ing, of Chicago; the style is Romanesque. The corner-stone 



388 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

was laid by Bishop Rademacher, on October 3, 1896, and Rev. 
Andrew Morrissey, President of the Notre Dame University, 
preached the sermon. The dedication of the church took 
place on October 10, 1897," conducted by Bishop Rademacher; 
the morning sermon being preached by Rev. Joseph F. Delaney, 
of Fort Wayne, and the evening sermon by Rev. Francis F. 
Moran, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

St. Mary's Church, complete, entailed an expenditure of 
$75,000; the entire amount of which was paid by Miss Bridget 
Roche, in memory of her brother deceased, John Roche. 

The parochial residence, the school house, the Sisters' 
house, the heating plant, and all other improvements, were 
made by the congregation, at a cost of |22,798.94, all of which 
has been paid off excepting $3,350. 

St. Mary's has 133 families, numbering 627 souls. The 
parish school, including high school, is taught by four Sisters 
of Providence; the number of pupils attending is 151. 

The Married Men's Sodality has sixty members; the Rosary 
Society, for married women, 105; the Young Men's Sodality, 
thirty-two; the Young Ladies' Sodality, fifty-seven; the Boys' 
and Girls' Sodality, forty-eight; the St. Vincent de Paul Society, 
twenty-eight; the League of the SS. Heart, 250 members. 
The C. B. L. has a membership of forty, and the Knights of 
Columbus, 250. 



HAMMOND. 

ST. JOHN baptist's CHURCH, 

1897. 

On April 17, 1897, Rev. Benedict M. Rajcany, at the 
request of Bishop Rademacher, emigrated to this country 
from Hungary, to establish a congregation of Slovacks living 
in Whiting and vicinity. He bought five lots in Robertsdale, 
now called North Hammond, and built a small frame church 
costing $940, which was dedicated on July 4, 1897. At this 
time, the congregation numbered about 150 souls. More 
ground was bought, and the first church being too small to 
accommodate the growing parish, a larger church, also frame, 
was erected in 1900, at a cost of $7,000. The seating capacity 
of the church is 480. In 1904, the spire of the church was 



The Churches, Continued. 389 



struck by lightning, inflicting a damage amounting to 

The tower was rebuilt, and at the same time the interior of 

the church was decorated. 

The school is a two-story frame building, with a nine foot 
brick basement. It has four school-rooms, is heated by a hot 
air furnace and was built in 1901, costing |3,850. For one 
term the school was taught by lay teachers, in the old church 
building; but, since November 1901, the Sisters of Providence 
of St. Mary-of-the-Woods have had charge. The usual grades 
are taught by four Sisters. The attendance at school is 237. 
The house, in which the Sisters reside,- was built for them in 
1900, at a cost of $1,900. The priest's house was built in 
1898, and necessitated an outlay of |2,200. In 1906 the 
priest's house and contents were wholly destroyed by fire. 
A new and better house was erected at a cost of about |7,000, 
in 1907. In 1903, a public school building was bought and 
moved on the church lot; it was then fitted up for a hall and 
school-rooms, at a cost of |4,000. 

In 1904, ten acres of land were bought in South Hammond 
for a cemetery, and a house was built on it for the sexton. 
The land cost |3,500, and the house |1,200. In 1903, the 
pastor bought twelve lots, in Indiana Harbor, for the estab- 
Hshment of another Hungarian Parish; the lots cost |2,250. 
The church property has a debt of |13,400. 

St. John the Baptist's Parish has the St. George's First 
Catholic Slavish Union, established in 1895: a mutual benefit 
and insurance society, with 200 members. St. John's Society, 
organized in 1904, with sixty-six members. The St. Benedict's 
Court of Catholic Order of Foresters, established in 1902, with 
sixty-three members. A Ladies Auxiliary of the First Catholic 
Slavish Union established in 1900, with eighty-seven members. 
The Rosary Society, for married women, has sixty members, 
and the Children of Mary number twenty-six. Three girls of 
the parish have become Sisters. Father Rajcany is still the 
pastor of St. John Baptist's Church. The Holy Trinity Church 
(Hungarian) in East Chicago is a mission attended by Father 
Rajcany. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



THE CHURCHES — CONTINUED 

1898-1907 

FORT WAYNE, THE MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD — HAMMOND, ALL 

saints' — SOUTH BEND, ST. STANISLAUS' — FAIRMOUNT 

SOUTH BEND, ST. CASIMIR'S — SOUTH BEND, ST. STEPHEN'S — 

hammond, st. adalbert's — indiana harbor, st. 
Patrick's — mishawaka, st. bavo's — Indiana harbor, 
st. john cantius'. 



FORT WAYNE. 

CHURCH OF THE MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD. 

1895. 

On February 12, 1895, Bishop Rademacher assigned the 
territory north of the St. Mary's river and to the New York, 
Chicago and St. Louis railway, and west of the Lake Shore 
and Michigan Southern railway, in and near the city of Fort 
Wayne, to the pastoral care of the Society of the Most Precious 
Blood. October 12, 1897, marks the beginning of the new 
congregation, when the Rev. Frank Nigsch, C. PP. S., entered 
upon the pastoral duties, within the territory mentioned. On 
the north-west corner of Fourth and Barthold streets, nine 
lots were bought for |2,500; and the additional purchase of 
the feeder, of the old Wabash and Erie canal, gave the church 
grounds the entire length on Fourth street between Barthold 
and Andrew streets, and 250 feet north of Fourth street. 
About 135 families resided within the parish limits; fifty-five 
of which had hitherto attended the Catherdal, forty-two St. 
Mary's and about thirty-eight St. Paul's. A two-story brick 
building, to serve the purposes of church and school, 50x111 
feet, at a cost of $9,945, was erected in 1898. The street, sewer 
and other improvements, and the furnishings of the second 
floor, for church purposes, including an organ, necessitated an 
additional outlay of |6,783.98. The school was opened on 
September 12, 1898, in charge of the Sisters of the Most Precious 
Blood, with an attendance of 160 children. The eight grades 



The Churches, Continued. 391 

of a common school education are being taught. The School 
Society of the Precious Blood, organized in the same year, has 
the support of the school for its principal purpose. The same 
year the Fathers of the Most Precious Blood erected a Mis- 
sionary House, which serves also as a pastoral residence, 
fronting on Barthold street. 

An assembly hall, 30x80 feet, being a one-story brick 
structure, furnished with a stage and necessary fixtures, was 
erected in 1902, at a cost of about |3,200. The present indebt- 
edness on the church property is |1,832.65. 

In 1898 the School Society, the Rosary Society, the Young 
Ladies' Sodality and the Society of the Holy Infancy, were 
established; and in 1899 the Young Men's Sodality and the 
Sodality of the Children of Mary, with a total membership 
of 517. 

One of the boys of the congregation has entered a religious 
community, and is now studying for the priesthood; and one 
of the girls has become a Sister. 

The Rev. Frank Nigsch, C. PP. S., was the pastor of the 
congregation until January 19, 1903, when he was transferred 
to Ottawa, Ohio. The Rev. Chrysostom Hummer, C. PP. S., 
has been the pastor since January, 1903. He reduced the 
debt to its present figure. The parish has 170 families, with 
total of 823 souls. The school, taught by four Sisters of the 
Most Precious Blood, has an attendance of 172 pupils. Besides 
the societies mentioned, there are the C. B. L., the C. K. of A., 
and the Ladies Catholic Benevolent Association, with an 
aggregate membership of eighty-two. 



HAMMOND. 

ALL saints' church. 

1896. 

The church grounds have a frontage of 300 feet, and a 
depth of 164 feet; 250 feet of which was secured by Rev. John 
Cook, in April 1896, and fifty feet by Rev. E. F. Barrett, on 
March 8, 1904, at a total cost of |7,500. Father Cook, at that 
time, resided in a two-story frame house, located at 265 Fayette 
street. The church, a very plain frame building, was erected 
in 1896, by Father Cook. It had no features of architecture 



392 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

nor decorations to recommend it, and cost about |1,000. This 
building was enlarged in 1897 for |3,000, and again in 1902, 
at an expense of $3,600, by Father Barrett. It answers the 
purposes of both church and school ; the church portion having 
a seating capacity for 400, and the school portion, 33x122 
feet, will accommodate 268 children. 

The school was opened in 1897, and has from the beginning 
been in charge of the Sisters of Providence, of St. Mary-of-the- 
Woods, the usual grades being taught by six Sisters. The 
attendance at school is 229. The Sisters live in a house, espec- 
ially erected for them, in 1899, at an expense of |2,200. 

The priest's house is an elegant brick building, with every 
modern improvement, erected in 1897, at an outlay of |4,875. 
Improvements were made on it, in 1901, costing $480. The 
church property has a debt of $3,000. The number of souls 
in the parish is 600, consisting of 146 families. Two girls have 
become Sisters. 

All Saints' Parish has the Knights of Columbus, Unity 
Council No. 726, organized on January 18, 1903, with a mem- 
bership of 105. The Catholic Order of Foresters, Luers Court 
No. Ill, with fifty-one members. The Ladies' Catholic Benev- 
olent Association, All Saints' Branch No. 989, organized on 
June 8, 1905, with forty members. All these are insurance 
societies. Besides these there are: The Rosary Society, for 
married women, with eighty-one members; the Young Men's 
Sodality, with forty-two members; the Young Ladies' Sodality, 
with fifty-seven members; the Children of Mary, with fifty- 
eight members; the St. Aloysius' Sodality for boys, with thirty- 
three members. 

The first pastor of All Saints' Church was Rev. John 
Cook, from April 1896 till February 27, 1897, on which date 
he was succeeded by Rev. Edward F. Barrett, the present 
pastor. 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. STANISLAUS' CHURCH. 
1898. 



The Polish Catholics, residing in the north-western section 
of South Bend, constitute the St. Stanislaus' Congregation. 



The Churches, Continued. 393 

It was called Linden Place and Gojden Hills. At the time of 
its organization, the number of families was about sixty. The 
church was erected in 1898. It is in the Gothic style of archi- 
tecture, has a seating capacity of 425, and cost |23,0OO. St. 
Stanislaus, B. and M., is the patron Saint of the parish. Not 
the entire church according to the original plan was erected 
but only two-thirds of it, the other third, being the sanctuary 
is still wanting. At first the accommodations were ample, 
but at the present time it is much too small, three masses 
being necessary to give all the opportunity of hearing mass. 
The Rev. V. Czyzewski, C. S. C, pastor of St. Hedwig's Church, 
assisted by an able committee of lay-men and a willing people, 
organized St. Stanislaus' Congregation, bought the site for 
$5,000, and built the church. 

For fully three years and a half the pastors of St. Stanis- 
laus' Church resided at St. Hedwig's. The Rev. H. Jarzynski, 
C. S. C, was the first temporary pastor. He resided with 
Father Czyzewski for six months. The present pastor. Rev. 
Roman A. Marciniak, C. S. C, who was appointed in 1900, 
resided at St. Hedwig's for three years. The basement of the 
church served as dining-room, and at times as bed-room for 
the pastor. In 1903, a commodious pastoral residence was 
built on the north side of the church. 

Although the accommodations in the basement of the 
church were not what they should be, yet a parochial school 
was conducted there, until 1905. It was in this year that the 
present roomy school-house was erected. At present St. 
Stanislaus' Church has 282 families, numbering 1543 souls. 
The school is conducted by Sisters of the Holy Cross, with an 
attendance of 277 children. The societies are: St. Joseph's, 
St. Stanislaus' and the Holy Rosary, for married men, with 
341 members; the Apostleship of Prayer, for married women, 
154 members; St. Stanislaus', for single men, twenty-eight 
members; Holy Rosary, for single women, forty members; 
Children of Mary and Holy Angels', for children, seventy-two 
members; and St. Cecilia's Choir, with twenty members. The 
debt on the church property is $23,900. 



I 



394 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

FAIRMOUNT. 

ST. Cecilia's church. 
- 1899. 

It was about 1860, that priests began to visit Fairmount, 
as a station. The first of these priests was Rev. John Ryan, 
who attended from Lagro, four times a year. After him came 
Rev. Bernard Kroeger, from Peru; Rev. John Kelly, Kokomo; 
Rev. B. T. Borg, Peru; Rev. C. Mougin, Rev. A. J. Strueder, J! 
Rev. F. C. Wiechmann, Rev. John Grogan; the latter four from f 
Marion. When visiting Fairmount, they would celebrate Mass 
at the homes of various families. The number of souls in the 
vicinity of Fairmount, at that time, was about 100, mostly 
Irish. Rev. Frederick Wiechmann visited Fairmount, as a 
station, from Gas City, from April 1894 till August 1898. 
During the pastorate of Rev. Joachim Baker, who attended 
Fairmount from Alexandria, from August 1898 till September 

1900, the first church was built, being ready for occupancy on 
September 15, 1899. The building was erected at a cost of 
about |3,000. At this time, the number of souls was about 
350. The two lots that compose the church grounds, 75x150 
feet each, were purchased by Father Baker, for $300. St. 
Cecilia's Church is a frame structure, with Gothic features, and 
is neatly furnished, having stained glass windows. The seating 
capacity of the church is about 350. 

The priest's house was built in 1902 by Rev. Henry C. 
Kappel, who was the pastor from July 14, 1901 to June 30, 
1905. It is a frame building containing seven rooms, and 
cost probably 1 1,400. Owing to the general depreciation of 
value on real estate in Fairmount, the church property, at 
present, would command no more than |3,000. St. Cecilia's 
Church has three societies: The Rosary Society, for the 
Married People; the St. Aloysius' Society, for Young Men and 
Boys, and the Children of Mary for the Young Women and 
Girls of the parish. The number of souls, at the present time, 
is ninety-four, constituting twenty families. Fairmount, since 
it became a mission, has had these pastors: Rev. Joachim 
Baker, from August 1898 to September 1900, from Alexandria 
Rev. L. R. Paquet, from September 2, 1900 till January 1, 

1901, residing at Fairmount; Father Baker, again, from January 



1 



The Churches, Continued. 395 

1, 1901 till July 14, 1901, from Alexandria; Rev. Henry C. 
Kappel, from July 14, 1901 to June 30, 1905, residing at Fair- 
mount; Father Baker, a third time, from June 30, 1905 till 
December 7, 1905; Rev. Thomas Travers, residing at Fair- 
mount, since December 7, 1905. 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. casimir's church. 

1899. 

In the year 1896, Father Czyzewski, anticipating the needs 
of Polish Catholics in the south-western part of South Bend, 
bought the four lots of ground on West Dunham and Webster 
streets. On September 11, 1898-, Rev. Anthony Zubowicz, 
C. S. C, at the time assistant to Father Czyzewski and the 
director of St. Hedwig's School, was appointed the pastor of 
the new St. Casimir's Congregation. He began at once the 
erection of a building, which was to serve the purposes both of 
church and school. It is a two-story brick building, 65x125 
feet, the first story containing six school-rooms and the second 
story having seating capacity of 749, costing $25,000. Whilst 
this building was being erected Father Zubowicz resided at 
St. Hedwig's. On March 4, 1899, the new structure was dedi- 
cated by the Very Rev. John Guendling, Administrator of the 
diocese of Fort Wayne. 

On April 11, 1899, Father Zubowicz resigned and was 
succeeded by Rev. Eligius Raczynski, C. S. C. During his 
pastorate many improvements were made: a beautiful organ 
was secured for $1,300, together with some statuary, and 
especially the new parochial residence of brick, 35x44 feet, 
which cost over $3,000. Quite suddenly. Father Raczynski 
in the prime of life expired, on June 11, 1902. Two days later. 
Father Zubowicz again took charge of St. Casimir's Church. 
Up to this time the school had been taught by lay men and 
women, but now it was placed in charge of the Sisters of Naza- 
reth, who, six in number, live in a rented house one block 
from the church, and teach 543 children. Five boys of the 
parish have entered the seminary, and eighteen girls the con- 
vent. The census of St. Casimir's Congreagtion shows a 
record of 480 families, with a total of 2595 souls. 



396 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

The societies of the parish are: St. Casimir's, for men, 
since 1898, with 250 members; the Sacred Heart of Jesus Con- 
fraternity, since 1899, with 112 members; St. Stanislaus Kostka's 
Society, with 200 members; St. Valentine's Society, since 1902, 
with twenty-five members; St. Hedwig's Society, with eighty 
members; St. Cecilia's Society, since 1901, with thirty members; 
St. Casimir's Literary Society, since 1899, with forty-three 
members; the Boys' Altar Society, since 1903, with 75 mem- 
bers; the Ladies' Rosary Sodality with 295 members; the 
Young Ladies' Sodality, since 1901, with seventy-two mem- 
bers; the Children of Mary, since 1903, with forty-seven mem- 
bers. 

Rev. Casimir Olszewski was assistant at St. Casimir's 
Church. 

St. Casimir's Church has money in the treasury. 



SOUTH BEND. 

ST. Stephen's (magyar) church. 

1900. 

Until their parish was organized, the Hungarians of South 
Bend attended St. Patrick's Church, and also St. Mary's Church, 
because many of them spoke German. During this time, Rev. 
Charles Boehm, of Cleveland, and Rev. Robert Paulovits, of 
Toledo, Ohio, paid their country-men in South Bend repeated 
visits, and ministered to them. 

Rev. Michael J. Biro, C. S. C, shortly after his ordination 
in February, 1900, was appointed pastor of the Hungarian 
Catholics, and within a short time organized the St. Stephen's 
Congregation. A Methodist chapel, known as the Milburn 
Memorial Chapel, was for sale, and Father Biro negotiated its 
purchase, on July 3, 1900. The architectural style of this 
church is the Cross-Gothic-Romanesque, of the fifth century. 
The building was in good condition but had to be altered con- 
siderably to serve the purpose of a Catholic church. Three 
altars were secured, with statues of the Blessed Virgin, St. 
Joseph and St. Anthony. A choir loft was built and the 
stations of the Cross were erected. The entire church property 
was inclosed with an ornamental iron fence. All this was 



The Churches, Continued. 397 

done at a cost of 1 1,450. The original cost paid for the prop- 
erty was |14,800. 

Father Biro erected the parochial school in 1900. The 
building is 45x45 feet, has four class-rooms, each of which can 
accommodate fifty children. Three thousand dollars was spent 
on this building. The school is in charge of three secular 
teachers, one male and two females, who teach six grades. 
The attendance at the present time is 171. The priest's house 
was part of the first purchase, but Father Biro has spent on it 
|500 in repairs and improvements. The debt on the church 
property is $7,900. 

When Father Biro took charge in 1900 he found about 
sixty Hungarian families. At the present time there are 321 
families, numbering 2166 souls. The seating capacity of the 
church is only 350, and the necessity of building a more com- 
modious church is evident. St. Stephen's Congregation has 
the following societies: The Knights of St. Stephen, twenty 
members; the Holy Rosary, sixty members; the Children of 
Mary, fifty-six members. The Aid Societies are: St. Stephen's 
forty-five; St. Joseph's, 325; St. Peter's, 108; Holy Trinity, 
eighty; St. Anthony's, 125; Blessed Virgin Mary's, eighty- 
seven; St. Elizabeth's, ninety; Catholic Young Men, fifty-six; 
Count Szechemyi's, 240 members. 



HAMMOND. 

ST. Adalbert's church. 

1902. 

Prior to the organization of St. Adalbert's Congregation 
at Hammond, the Polish Catholics, now part of its member- 
ship, attended St. Casimir's Church at Hammond. The parish, 
organized in 1901, consisted at that time of about seventy 
families. The church grounds are composed of seven lots, 
which were acquired for |2,000. The present church, a frame 
structure of 40x80 feet, costing |3,000, was erected under the 
supervision of Rev. P. A. Kahellek, who had charge of the 
new parish till June 1902. The church was built in the spring 
of 1902, and was dedicated in September of the same year. 
Rev. Peter A. Budnik had charge from June 1, 1902, till June 



398 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

8, 1907, when Rev. F. Seroczynski succeeded him. The altar, 
the pews and the confessional, provided by Father Budnik, 
necessitated an outlay of about |500. 

.A. room 20x40 feet was partitioned off in the rear of the 
altar, and served as a school-room till 1906; up to which time 
the school was taught by lay-teachers. The present school 
building is a two-story brick structure with stone trimmings 
and basement. It was erected in 1906 by Father Budnik, at 
a cost of |7,051. A room in the basement is used for society 
meetings. At the present time two Sisters of St. Francis have 
charge of the school, with an attendance of 109 pupils. 

The priest's house, a one-story frame structure, was built 
by Father Budnik in 1902. Including furniture it cost |1,400. 
The debt on the church property is $6,000. St. Adalbert's 
Congregation has these societies: St. Adalbert's Society, for 
married men, twenty-five members; the Holy Rosary Society, 
for married women, forty-five members; St. Stanislaus Kostka's 
Society, for single men, fifteen members; the Holy Rosary 
Society, for single women, fifteen members; the Children of 
Mary, 109 members; St. Hedwig's Society, for married women, 
twenty members; St. Casimir's Society, eighteen members. 



INDIANA HARBOR. 

ST. Patrick's church. 
1903. 

Indiana Harbor had existed but one year when, on May 
24, 1902, Rev. Thomas Mungovan was appointed the pastor 
of what was at the time a congregation of eight Catholic families, 
six Irish and two German. The church grounds are composed 
of twelve lots, with a frontage of 420 feet, and were purchased 
on September 5, 1902. The East Chicago Land Company 
donated four of these lots, and Father Mungovan paid $1,352 
for the other eight. Until the erection of a building. Father 
Mungovan made his home with Rev. Charles Thiele, at Whiting. 
The building which was erected, in 1903, is a combination of 
church, school and residence, 65x33 feet. It is a two-story 
frame building. Two school-rooms are on the ground floor, 
and also the priest's residence, composed of library, dining- 



The Churches, Continued. 399 

room, kitchen and two bed rooms. The church is on the second 
floor. Construction of the building is such, that the whole of 
it can ultimately be used for a school. This combination 
building was blessed and Mass celebrated in it for the first 
time, on January 25, 1903. At this time the number of families 
had increased to nineteen. The church has been furnished 
with every necessary article of furniture, vestments, sacred 
vessels and so forth. The cost of the building and its furnish- 
ing was |5,100. The seating capacity of the church is 200. 
The church property has a debt of |5,000. The total number 
of souls at present is 268, consisting of 69 families. 

St. Patrick's Church has two societies: The Sodality of 
the Children of Mary, which was established on June 11, 1903, 
and is composed of boys and girls, who have received their 
first Communion. The Rosary Society, which was organized 
on October 30, 1905, is composed of married and single women, 
having a membership of thirty-one. 



MISHAWAKA. 

ST. BAVO'S CHURCH. 
1903. 

Rev. Louis de Seille was the first Belgian emigrant to 
America, who came to St. Joseph county to labor and die here, 
as we have recorded elsewhere. After him came other of his 
countrymen, settling in South Bend and Mishawaka. Rev. 
August B. Oechtering, pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Misha- 
waka, did all he could to welcome these brethern in the faith, 
and secured for them the services of priests of their own nation- 
ahty, from time to time. Owing to the efforts made by Father 
Oechtering, the Bishop of Ghent sent a newly ordained Belgian 
priest, to take charge of the Belgian Catholics in Mishawaka, 
It was Rev. Charles L. Stuer, who arrived on September 29, 
1902, and took up his residence with Father Oechtering, as 
assistant. The death of Father Oechtering, at the close of 
1902, discouraged the young Belgian priest and he concluded 
to seek another field of labor. Before going, however, he 
would give the Belgians a mission, to dispose them for their 
Easter Communion. The attendance during this mission 



400 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

revealed the fact, that the Belgian population of Mishawaka 
was much larger, than had been suspected. In response to 
the visit of a committee. Bishop Alerding visited Mishawaka, 
in March 1903, when it was determined to organize a Belgian 
parish. In less than three days, over |4,000 were subscribed, 
and in addition, Ivo Talleu donated six lots, and Leo Bultinck 
donated the present priest's house. On May 3, 1903 Bishop 
Alerding blessed a frame structure, 85x35 feet, to be used 
temporarily as a place of worship. 

The corner-stone for St. Bavo's Church was laid, on May 8, 

1904, by Bishop Meerschaert, Vicar-apostolic of Indian Terri- 
tory, a Belgian by birth. It was on the first day of January, 

1905, that the church was solemnly dedicated to the service 
of Almighty God, by Bishop Alerding. The parish has 201 
families, numbering 975 souls. The amount of debt is |1 8,500. 
St. Bavo's has the Sodality of the Children of Mary, with 
twenty-seven members; the Rosary Confraternity, for Married 
Women, with fifty-four members; St. Bavo's Society, for Men, 
with seventy-seven members. 

In 1906, the building used temporarily for worship, together 
with an addition built to it, was converted into a school of 
four-rooms. Adjacent to this school building a commodious 
frame residence was erected for the Sisters. The Dominican 
Sisters have charge of the schools. Three of these Sisters are, 
at present, teaching 120 children. 



INDIANA HARBOR. 

ST. JOHN CANTIUS' CHURCH. 
1906. 

Until the present St. John Cantius' Church was built, the 
Polish Catholics composing it, attended St. Adalbert's Church 
at Hammond. The church was erected under the supervision 
of Rev. Peter A. Budnik, and was completed in February, 
1906. The building has two-stories with basement, 44x65 
feet, and is constructed of artificial stone. The first floor is 
arranged for school and pastoral residence, while the second 
floor serves for church purposes. The cost of the building, 
inclusive of furniture, was |7,500. The church grounds consist 



The Churches, Continued. 401 

of nine lots; seven of which were bought by Father Budnik at 
a cost of |900, and the two other lots at a cost of $1,050 by 
Rev. Anthony Stachowiak in 1907. A belfry was added to 
the building by Father Stachowiak at a cost of |150. Plans 
for a new pastoral residence are now being prepared, and the 
building is to be ready for occupancy by September, 1907. 

Heretofore the school has been in charge of one lay-teacher, 
with an attendance of eighty-six children; but in September of 
1907 two Sisters of St. Francis took charge, with an increased 
attendance of 150 pupils. The number of families of St. John 
Cantius' Congregation is 140, numbering 900 souls. The debt 
on the church property amounts to $7,000. The parish has 
the Sacred Heart Society, for married men, with thirty-five 
members; the Rosary Society, for married women, thirty 
members; the St. John Cantius' Society, for men, thirty-one 
members. 



CHAPTER XV. 

THE CHURCHES, CONTINUED, 
MISSIONS AND STATIONS. 



LEO — LUCERNE — SAN PIERRE — LIGONIER — SCHIMMELS — CICERO 
— MONTPELIER — PIERCETON — CLARK's HILL — COLFAX — 
FRANCISVILLE — ROANOKE — MEDARYVILLE — ROCHESTER — 
LADOGA — ALBION — BLUFFTON — BREMEN — WARSAW — MIL- 
LERSBURG — SUMMIT — ST. MARY's OF THE PRESENTATION — 
KOUTS — WHEATFIELD — HAMLET — ROLLING PRAIRIE — RO.ME 
CITY — ALBANY — GENEVA — CULVER — VEEDERSBURG — RED 
KEY — MOROCCO — KNIMAN — OTTERBEIN — WOODVILLE — 
EAST CHICAGO, HOLY TRINITY — BUNKER HILL — ROYAL 
CENTER — WINCHESTER — KNOX — MATTHEWS. 



LEO. 

ST. LEO'S CHURCH. 

1856. 



The following is the long list of priests who have attended 
to the spiritual wants of Catholics at and near Leo: 1. Rev. 
G. Miettinger, from January 26, 1862 till 1865. 2. Rev. J. C. 
Carrier, C. S. C, from January 13, 1865 till June 21, 1866. 
3. Rev. Frederick Julian Holz, from June 1866 till July 25, 
1868. 4. Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, from July 25, 1868 till 
.August 1872. 5. Rev. August Young, from .August 22, 1872 
till November 1874. 6. Rev. Peter Franzen, from February 
1875 till November 1876. 7. Rev. C. Wardy, from April 
1877 till May 1878. 8. Rev. John J. Shea, C. S. C, Rev. 
B. Roche, C. S. C, from July 1878 till March 1879. 9. Rev. 
James Gleeson, C. S. C, from March 1879 till July of the same 
year. 10. Rev. Peter Fallize, C. S. C, from July 1879 till 



The Churches, Continued. 403 

January 1880. 11. Rev. \V. Demers, C. S. C, from .April till 
July 1880. 12. Rev. Thomas \'agnier, C. S. C, from .August 
1880 till June 1888. 13. Rev. P. J. Franciscus, C. S. C, 
from August 1888 till February 1889. 14. Rev. John Lauth, 
C. S. C, from March 1889 till September 1890. 15. Rev. 
M. J. Byrne, from February till July 1889. 16. Rev. .M. 
Robinson, C. S. C, from July 1 889 till September 1 892. 1 7. Rev. 
L. J. Miller, C. S. C, from October 1892 till Januarv 1893. 
18. Rev. J. M. Toohey, C. S. C. from May 1893 till August 
1895. 19. Rev. Jacob Lauth, C. S. C, from August 1895 
till December of the same year. 20. Rev. .\. E. St. .\maud, 
C. S. C. from December 1895 till July 1898. 21. Rev. A. E. 
Lafontaine, from July 1898 till .August 1901. 22. Rev. M. P. 
Louen, from August 1901 till January 1, 1907. 23. Rev. 
Ambrose Dowd, C. PP. S., since Januarv 1, 1907. 

St. Leo's Church was built in 1856, while the place was 
being attended by Revs. Julian Benoit and E. M. Faller. 
Father Zumbuelte built the pastoral residence in 1870. The 
cemeterv grounds were donated bv Peter Sullivan, in 1863. 
The pastor of St. \'incent's has charge of the mission Leo. 



LUCERNE. 

ST. Elizabeth's church. 

1858. 



The first church was built by Rev. George .A. Hamilton, 
in 1858, at a distance of about two miles from Lucerne. It 
was dedicated by Bishop Luers. in 1S63. Here divine ser\-ices 
were held until November 12, 1905, when Rev. Edward J. 
Houlihan, the present pastor, bought the church of the Evan- 
gelical .Association, in the town of Lucerne. This change was 
made at a cost of about $2,500. St. Elizabeth's parish has 
also a cemeterv of its own. The only priests who had their 
residence in Lucerne were Rev. Charles J. Mougin, from April 
13. 1868 till 1870, and Rev. James O'Brien from 1870 till the 
fall of 1871. From that date to the present time, the priests 
attendins: Lucerne have resided at Fulton, or Grass Creek, or 
Kewanna. which three names mean one and the same place. 



404 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

Reference is made to the list of pastors, as given under the 
head of Fulton county, St. Ann's Church. 

St. Elizabeth's mission has twenty-two families, number- 
ing 114 souls. There is no debt on the church property. 

SAN PIERRE. 

ALL saints' church. 

1858. 

The building of the Monon railroad may be considered the 
beginning of San Pierre, when five Catholic families settled here. 
One of the pioneer priests, who visited San Pierre, was Rev. 
John McMahon, the year 1856, when Mass was celebrated in 
the house of Michael Griffin. But prior to Father McMahon's 
visit. Rev. Burns had been here. A building, used as a barrel 
factory, was bought in 1858, for |50, and was made to answer 
the purposes of a church. It stood where the present church 
stands. From 1860 till 1879, Rev. Joseph Stephan made San 
Pierre his headquarters. From the year 1880 until the fall of 
1884 San Pierre was attended by the Franciscan Fathers, from 
Reynolds, Indiana. The names of Fathers John, Athanasius 
and Ignatius are still current with the people. Priests of the 
Most Precious Blood Community, from the fall of 1884 until 
July 1885, when Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S., began to 
reside at San Pierre, attended San Pierre. The first church, 
already mentioned, was 18x12 feet, but in 1877 an addition of 
10 feet was made; but, in 1885- Father Shunk planned a new 
church, which was built and ready for services in 1886. The 
pastor, having completed the church, used the old church 
building for his residence, during a period of eight years. In 
the fall of 1895 Wanatah became Father Shunk's place of 
residence. From here he attended San Pierre, until the fall 
of 1895, after which date the Rev. John Kubacki, of North 
Judson, took charge. After this time the pastors of North 
Judson have attended San Pierre, in the order named: Rev. 
John Kubacki, Rev. Peter Kahellek, Rev. Joseph Bolka, Rev. 
Felix Seroczynski, and Rev. Charles F. Keyser. 

Mass is celebrated on alternate Sundays. San Pierre has 
twenty-eight Catholic families, numbering 140 souls. There is 
no debt on the church property. 



The Churches, Continued. 405 

, LIGONIER. 

ST. Patrick's church. 
1860. 

The Rev. Henry Vincent Schaefer, pastor at Avilla, visited 
Ligonier, and it is a matter of record, that he celebrated Mass 
in the home of Henry Zonker. It was Father Schaefer, who 
erected the church in 1860. An acre of ground was donated 
by John Richmond. The dimensions of the building were 
30x60 feet. Rev. Dominic Duehmig remodeled the church 
and added two rooms, for the accommodation of the visiting 
pastor, in 1877. Ligioner was attended by several priests 
from different places, at different times, such as Rev. Henry 
Meissner, Rev. Louis Moench, Rev. Henry Boeckelmann, Rev. 
Anthony Kroeger, Rev. Alexander Buechler, Rev. Simon M. 
Yenn, until 1897, when the Rev. George Lauer was appointed 
resident pastor of Ligonier, by Bishop Rademacher. Father 
Lauer at once built a pastoral residence, but in 1899 he was 
succeeded by Rev. John F. Noll. Father Noll, considering 
Kendallville more desirable and more serviceable for the resi- 
dence of the priest, with the consent of the Administrator of 
the diocese, began to reside at Kendallville, and to visit Ligonier 
as a mission. Father Noll had the interior of the church 
neatly decorated. He was succeeded on June 8, 1902, by Rev. 
John C. Keller, who has charge at the present time. Father 
Keller has made several necessary repairs and improvements. 
The church property is out of debt. The number of souls is 
eighty, constituting twenty-one families. 



SCHIMMELS, LAPORTE COUNTY. 

ST. martin's church. 

1860. 

Schimmels, formerly known as Schimmelsville, is situated 
about two miles north of Lacrosse. In the year 1856, Mass 
was said for the first time in the house of Joseph Preis, Sr., by 
an old German priest, Rev. Andrew Tusch. The congregation 
was organized in 1859, by Rev. Martin Sherer, pastor at Laporte. 
The present church was built by him, in 1860. The church 
grounds consist of four acres, donated by Daniel Callahan, now 



406 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

of Toledo, Ohio. Patrick and Richard Huncheon donated a 
few acres for cemetery purposes. The priests, who supplied 
the spiritual wants of St. Martin's congregation, follow in their 
chronological order; 1. Rev. Andrew Tusch. 2. Rev. Mar- 
tin Sherer, pastor at Laporte. 3. Rev. Gabriel Volkert, 
assistant at Laporte. 4. Rev. Julius Becks, pastor at Michi- 
gan City. 5. Rev. J. Stephan, pastor at San Pierre. 6. Rev. 
Peter Franzen, the first resident pastor, from October 1878 to 
April 1881. 7. Rev. Philibert Altstaetter, O. F. M., residing 
at Lafayette, from May 1881 to August 25, 1881. 8. Rev. 
Markus Kreke, O. F. M., residing at Lafayette, from August 28, 
to December 1881. " 9. Rev. John Frericks, C. PP. S., residing 
at Indian Creek, now Pulaski, from December 1881 to April 
1885. 10. Rev. Christian Nigsh, C. PP. S., residing at Win- 
amac, from April to July 1885. 11. Rev. Dominic Shunk, 
C. PP. S., residing at San Pierre, from July 1885 to 1888 and 
at Wanatah, from 1888 to February 1897. From this date 
St. Martin's Church was attended by pastors residing at Wana- 
tah. 12. Rev. Edward Jakob, C. PP. S., until September 
1897. 13. Rev. Raymond Vernimont, C. PP. S., till Septem- 
ber 8, 1898. 14. Rev. Adam M. Buchheit till November 21, 
1906. 15. Rev. John Rech till June 8, 1907. 16. Rev. 
John Oberholz, since June 8, 1907. 



CICERO. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1863. 

In 1836, some German Catholic families located in Hamil- 
ton county, about three and a half miles northeast of Cicero, 
and it was called Buscher's settlement. The Rev. Vincent 
Bacquelin residing at Shelbyville, was the first priest to visit 
here. It is said of him that he met his death, by being thrown 
by his horse against a tree. After him came priests from 
Indianapolis, such as Revs. Patrick McDermott, J. H. O'Brien, 
Danial Maloney, Peter Leonard Brandt, Simon Siegrist, August 
Bessonies and John Gueguen. When in 1857, the diocese of 
Fort Wayne was established the priests of Indianapolis ceased 
to visit here. 

The priests who attended Cicero, from 1857 until the 



The Churches, Continued. 407 

• 

present time, are the following: Rev. Michael J. Clark, Ander- 
son, 1857; Rev. B. Kroeger, Logansport, assistant at St. 
Vincent de Paul's, 1863; Rev. Lawrence Lamoor, Peru, assist- 
ant, 1865; Rev. B. T. Borg, 1868; Rev. F. Lordemann, Kokomo, 
1873; Rev. F. G. Lentz, 1876; Rev. John Blum, 1892 till 1895; 
Franciscan Fathers, Lafayette, from 1896 till 1898; Rev. B. 
Biegel, Elwood, from March till September 10, 1898; Rev. 
P. J. O'Reilly from September 10, 1898 till June 1899; Rev. 
F. J. Jansen, from June 24, 1899 till October 30, 1906; Rev. 
William B. Hordeman, since October 30, 1906. 

in 1863, a church was built in Buscher's Settlement and 
was dedicated by Bishop Luers, in 1864. At the same time, a 
church was built in Mullen's Settlement, six miles northwest 
from Cicero. The Washington Glass Company, coming to 
Cicero in 1894, brought with it a number of Catholic settlers, 
who were anxious to have church accommodations. At their 
request, Bishop Rademacher instructed Father Biegel of 
Elwood to do for them what he could. On March 31, 1898, 
Father Biegel celebrated Mass at Cicero, and through his efforts 
six lots were bought, in August of that year. Father O'Reilly 
on leaving Frankfort had collected $600 for the new church. 
The corner-stone for the new church was laid on September 
30, 1900, by Rev. Charles B. Guendling, of Lafayette, and Rev. 
B. Biegel preached the sermon. The church was dedicated by 
Bishop Alerding, on September 29, 1901, and a class of twenty- 
four was confirmed. The church is 43x72 feet, with a nine-foot 
high basement and a brick veneered superstructure, with 
stained glass windows, three altars, fme pews and a baptistry. 
It has projecting towers and a side sacristy; the style of archi- 
tecture is a modified Gothic. The cost of the building was 
$6,000, and on June 29, 1906, the last dollar due on it was paid. 



MONTPELIER. 

ST. JOHN evangelist's CHURCH. 

1864. 

What has been said about Hartford City, with regard to 
visiting clergy in the early pioneer days, might be rightfully 
repeated with regard to Montpelier. The Catholics were few, 
and the small frame church, which was erected in 1864, was 



408 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

sufficient to accommodate them. When Bishop Rademacher, 
in March 1894, sent Rev. Charles Dhe to Hartford City as its 
first resident pastor, the Bishop gave him charge also of Mont- 
pelier, as a mission. By this time, the discovery of natural 
gas and oil had developed Montpelier into a lively and pros- 
perous town. Father Dhe began at once to collect funds for 
a new church, and, on June 4, 1896, Bishop Rademacher 
dedicated it. The church is a brick church after the Gothic 
style of architecture, and has two spires, one eighty and the 
other sixty feet high. The seating capacity is 200, and its 
cost was ^5,500. About the year 1900, Father Dhe erected a 
commodious priest's house adjacent to the church. When 
Father Dhe was transferred from Hartford City, the church 
property at Montpelier was indebted to the amount of 1 1,900. 
Rev. John F. Noll succeeded Father Dhe on July 11, 1906, and 
has charge of St. John's Church at Montpelier, attending it 
from Hartford City. 

The number of families is forty-one, with a total of 179 
souls. St. John's has an Altar Society and a Young Ladies' 
Sodality, 



PIERCETON. 

ST. FRANCIS' CHURCH. 

1864. 

It was Rev. John Ryan who in its early days visited 
Pierceton, in Kosciusko county, from Lagro on horseback. In 
the early sixties the Rev. Francis Lawler, resident at Laporte, 
looked after the spiritual welfare of the Catholics in and about 
Pierceton. It was under him that the Church of St. Francis 
Xavier, a frame structure, was erected in 1864. The resident 
priest at Columbia City, Rev. Henry Schaefer, next visited 
Pierceton. Rev. Geori^e Steiner, Rev. Francis Siegelack and 
Rev. George Zurwellen, resident priests at Plymouth, came 
next in the order given. After these Pierceton was visited by 
pastors of Columbia City, namely Rev. Joseph Rademacher, 
Rev. M. Zumbuelte, Rev. B. Theodore Borg and Rev. H. A. 
Hellhake. 

After this, Pierceton became a mission attended from 
Warsaw, where the Rev. F. C. Wiechmann was pastor, who 



I 



The Churches, Continued. 409 

attended the mission twice a month. Until 1885, Rev. A. M. 
Ellering paid visits to Pierceton, when it was made a mission 
to be attended from Areola. Since that time the respective 
pastors of Areola have successively attended Pierceton: Revs. 
J. H. Werdein, W. J. Quinlan, W. Conrad Miller, Robert J. 
Pratt, S. M. Yenn, Peter Schmitt, Henry C. Kappel, and since 
June 8, 1907 the present pastor at Areola, Rev. Edward J. 
Mungovan. 

At the present time the mission is attended on the second 
Sunday and Monday of each month. Pierceton has thirteen 
Catholic families numbering fifty-eight souls. There is no debt 
on the church property. 



I 



CLARK'S HILL. 

ST. ROSE OF Lima's church. 

1867. 

Until the year 1867, Clark's Hill and vicinity was visited 
by priests from Lafayette. The Catholics were few and were 
engaged, mostly, in the construction of railroads. Rev. E. B. 
Kilroy was the first to make regular visits, and celebrate Mass 
in private houses. Rev. John McMahon and Rev. Edward 
O'Flaherty, also paid visits here. In 1867, Rev. Joseph A. 
Winter built the present church, on two lots donated him. 
This church cost about |600, and has a seating capacity of 
sixty. Father Winter had charge until 1870, and Rev. John 
R. Dinnen attended until 1874, since which time Clark's Hill 
has been a mission of Lebanon, and is attended once a month, 
on the third Sunday. The number of souls at present is about 
fortv-two, or ten families. There is no debt on the church. 



COLFAX. 
ST. George's church. 
1867. 



In the early sixties, Colfax was visited from Lafayette by 
Rev. E. B. Kilroy, who celebrated Mass in private houses. 
Rev. John McMahon also came here. Rev. Joseph A. Winter 
erected the church in 1867. Two lots were donated for the 
purpose, and the money to build the church was collected 



410 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

chiefly from railroad employees. The church was a frame 
building, seating about sixty persons. Father Winter con- 
tinued to attend until Rev. George A. Hamilton and Rev. 
John R. Dinnen had charge till 1874, when it became a mission, 
attached to Lebanon, and since that time has been attended 
from there, on the third Sunday of every month. The number 
of souls at the present time is twenty-seven, or seven families. 
There is no debt on the church property. 



FRANCISVILLE. 

ST. FRANCIS' CHURCH. 

1867. 

The town of Francisville exists since 1847, but it was not 
until 1860 that a Catholic priest, in the person of Rev. John 
McMahon, visited here and celebrated Mass, in private resi- 
dences. For seven years, until 1867, Rev. George Steiner, 
Rev. Julius Becks and Rev. Burns attended this place. The 
congregation at this time numbered about twelve families, a 
mixture of Irish, American and German. 

The first and present church, built in 1867, is a frame struc- 
ture and cost about $1,500. The seating capacity is 200. The 
church grounds consist of two lots, acquired in the same year 
the church was built. The priests who attended Francisville 
while the church was building were. Rev. Burns and Rev. 
Anthony King. The church property has no debt. After the 
completion of the church, Rev. Joseph Stephan was the visiting 
pastor, for seven years. After this time, Franciscan Fathers 
had charge of it during ten years: Rev. Dominic Meier, O. F. 
M., Rev. Stephen Hoffman, O. F. M., Rev. Guido Stallo, O. F. 
M., Rev. Francis S. Schaefer, O. F. M., Rev. Peter A. Welling, 
O. F. M., Rev. Augustine Beyer, O. F. M. After these we note 
the following: Rev. John Berg, from June 1889 to June 8, 
1893; Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, from April 1888 to June 1889; 
Rev. George Schramm, from June 8, 1893; Rev. John Blum, 
from December 24, 1895 to November 1, 1896; Rev. John 
Kubacki, from November 1, 1896 to August 6, 1900; Rev. 
George Horstmann, from August 6, 1900 to July 4, 1905; Rev. 
Julius Seimetz, since July 4, 1905. 



The Churches, Continued. 411 

The number of souls at present is about eighty-one. Two 
girls of the parish have entered the religious state of life. 

Francisville is a mission attended from Reynolds, on the 
second Sunday of the month. 



RO./^NOKE. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1867. 

A settlement, called the German Settlement, existed four 
to five miles north of Roanoke, in 1840. Mass was offered in 
private houses, at that early date, by priests from Fort Wayne 
and Huntington, such as Revs. E. M. Faller, A. Schippert, 
Frederick Fuchs, Jacob Mayer, Henry V. Schaefer. A little 
later a small frame church was built, where Mass was celebrated 
at irregular intervals, by Rev. Theodore Van der Poel, coming 
from Areola. It is a matter of record, that he celebrated 
midnight Mass of Christmas in Nix Settlement, the second 
Mass at 5 o'clock in Roanoke, and the third Mass at 10 o'clock 
at Areola. His mode of travel was on horseback. 

A church built by Protestants, 60x28 feet, on the most 
elevated spot of Roanoke, was for sale and the Catholics bought 
it, in 1867. At that time the parish had from fifteen to twenty 
families. Rev. William Woeste was the first resident pastor 
of Roanoke, with Nix Settlement as a mission, from 1870 to 
November 19, 1880, he resided in a private house at Roanoke, 
and visited Nix Settlement twice a month. During his time, 
in 1873, four acres of ground, one quarter of a mile north of 
Roanoke, were bought for cemetery purposes. Rev. Cosmas 
Seeberger, C. PP. S., came next and remained for eight months. 
His successor in October 1881, Rev. W. Conrad Miller, took up 
his residence in Roanoke, in the basement of the church for 
eight or nine months, but in 1882 took possession of the new 
priest's house in Nix Settlement; after which Roanoke became 
a mission of Nix Settlement, and remains such at the present 
time. His successors, attending Roanoke from Nix Settle- 
ment, were: Rev. F. J. Lambert, from 1883 till 1884; Rev. 
Philip GuethoflF, from 1884 to 1889; Rev. Edward J. Boccard, 
from 1889 till 1895; Rev. Bruno Soengen, from December 1895 
till June 23, 1905; Rev. John Biedermann, since June 30, 1905. 



412 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

In Father Miller's time the congregation had forty families, 
but decreased by 1905, to thirteen or fourteen, and at present 
has about twenty-six famiUes, num.bering 112 souls, some of 
whom live a distance of six or seven miles from the church. 
One Roanoke boy has entered the Congregation of the Most 
Precious Blood. There is no debt on the church property. 



MEDARYVILLE. 

ST. henry's church. 
1869. 

Medaryville was named after the owner, at the time, of 
nearly all the land in this neighborhood, and it owes its present 
habitable condition to persistent drainage. The Catholic 
priests, who first visited this place were: Rev. John McMahon, 
resided in Lafayette; Rev. Anthony King, resided in Winamac; 
Rev. Joseph Stephan, resided in San Pierre. 

In 1869, when the first church was built, Father Stephan 
had charge. This church was a frame building, 24x43 feet, 
costing about $1,200. The number of souls at this time was 
about 100. The lot, on which the church stands, is located 
in the business portion of the town, and was donated by Mr. 
Ketchmark, a Catholic. There is no debt on the church prop- 
erty. The number of souls at the present time is about seventy- 
four. 

The priests who have served Medaryville after 1867, were 
Rev. George Steiner, Rev. Julius Becks and Rev. Burns. After 
this, for ten years, the following Franciscan Fathers had charge: 
Rev. Dominic Meier, O. F. M., Rev. Stephen Hoffmann, O. F. 
M., Rev. Guido Stallo, O. F. M., Rev. Francis S. Schaefer, 
O. F. M., Rev. Peter A. WelHng, O. F. M., Rev. Augustine 
Beyer, O. F. M. Then came secular priests, as follows: Rev. 
Matthias Zumbuelte, from April 1888 to June 1889; Rev. John 
Berg, from June 1889 to June 8, 1893; Rev. George Schramm, 
from June 8, 1893; Rev. John Blum, from December 24, 1895 
to November 1, 1896; Rev. John Kubacki, from November 1, 
1896 to August 6, 1900; Rev. George Horstmann, from August 
6, 1900 to July 4, 1905; Rev. Julius Seimetz, since July 4, 1905. 

Medaryville is a mission attended from Reynolds, on the 
fourth Sunday of the month. 



I 



The Churches, Continued. 413 

ROCHESTER. 

ST. Joseph's church. 
1869. 

Rev. Charles Joseph Mougin is the first priest, known to 
have celebrated Mass in Rochester. It was in the house of 
Louis Bogner the Holy Mysteries were celebrated. Rev. 
Bernard Kroeger, residing at Peru, visited and celebrated 
Mass here, for several years. In 1868 Father Kroeger, in the 
company of Bishop Luers, selected and bought the present 
church lots. The deed is dated October 19, 1868. The 
present little church was erected in 1869. After Father Kroeger, 
the following priests, in the order given, and residing in different 
places, attended St. Joseph's Church, at Rochester: Rev. 
Frederick C. Wiechmann, Rev. George Zurwellen, Rev. Louis 
A. Moench, Rev. Timothy O'Sullivan, Rev. John Dempsey, 
Rev. John Kelly, Rev. Charles Thiele, Rev. Gregory A. Zern 
and, at present. Rev. F. Joseph Bilstein. Monterey was the 
residence of the latter three. Services are held here once a 
month, on a week day. The congregation has six families, or 
twenty-five souls. There is no debt on the church property. 



LADOGA. 

ST. p.vfrick's church. 

1872. 

The Catholics of Ladoga, on December 12, 1872, purchased 
the Lutheran brick church of that place, and on May 4, 1873, 
it was dedicated as St. Patrick's Church, by Very Rev. P. Bede 
O'Connor, Vicar General of the diocese of Vincennes, assisted 
by Rev. E. P. Walters, pastor of Crawfordsville. The price 
paid for the building was |600, and $400 more was expended 
to remodel it for divine worship. At present the congregation 
numbers twelve families. The pastors of Crawfordsville, 
beginning with Rev. Michael J. Clarke and continuing to the 
present pastor, Rev. W. J. Quinlan, have had charge of Ladoga. 



414 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

ALBION. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 

1875. 

The Sacred Heart Church, at Albion, was built by Rev. 
Dominic Duehmig in 1875, and placed under the special patron- 
age of St. James, the Greater. It was dedicated, the same 
year on the feast of St. James, by Bishop Dwenger. At that 
time, the congregation consisted of twelve families. Up to 
1881, it was attended from .Avilla and up to 1900, from Ege, 
and since July 13, 1900, the pastor of Auburn has had charge 
of it. There are nine families left of the once flourishing con- 
gregation. The place is visited, at stated intervals, on week 
days, to give the few remaining Catholics the opportunity of 
the sacraments. The Rosary Society for married women has 
four members and the Sodality for single women has three. 
There is no debt on the church property. 



BLUFFTON. 

ST. Joseph's church. 

1875. 

The priests, who had charge at Bluflfton, are the following: 
Rev. H. Theodore Wilken, Areola, 1872 to 1876; Rev. Ferdi- 
nand Koerdt, from August 1876 to May 1896, from Sheldon; 
Rev. Rudolph J. Denk, Sheldon, from May 1896 till April 1900; 
Rev. J. H. Bathe, Sheldon, from April 1900 till August 12, 
1900; Rev. H. A. Hellhake, Sheldon, since August 12, 1900. 

Father Wilken, visiting the station Bluffton up to 1873, 
celebrated Mass in the house of Timothy Enright. The present 
St. Joseph's Church was built in 1875, at a cost of |1,300. 
Bluffton is attended from Sheldon. 



BREMEN. 
ST. Dominic's church. 

1875. 



This church was built by Rev. Dominic Duehmig, pastor 
at Avilla, in 1875. The three lots of ground were donated by 
a Mr. Martin. The church cost about $1,000. It has no 



p 



The Churches, Continued. 415 

steeple at the present time, the same having been built twice, 
and as often destroyed in a storm. When the congregation 
was organized, it numbered about ten families; at present the 
total number of souls is fourty-eight, or ten families. The 
seating capacity of the church is eighty. Father Duehmig 
continued to have charge of Bremen until 1894, after which 
time until September 10, 1899, it was attended from St. Hed- 
wig's Church, at South Bend. From the latter date until 
July 1901, Rev. Henry C. Kappel attended it from Walkerton. 
It was visited by Rev. Peter A. Budnik until June 15, 1902, and 
by Rev. Joseph Abel until the present time, both residing 
at Walkerton. There is no debt on the church property. 



WARSAV/. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1876. 

The priests who visited Warsaw from 1856 till 1874 were: 
Rev. John Ryan, of Lagro; Rev. Francis Lawler, of Laporte; 
Rev. George Zurwellen, of Plymouth; Rev. Henry V. Schaefer, 
of Avilla; Rev. Joseph Rademacher, of Columbia City; Rev. 
Matthias Zumbuelte, of Columbia City ; Rev. Henry A. Hellhake, 
of Columbia City. The number of souls, at this time, was 
about fifty. During these years Mass was celebrated generally 
in the house of William Dinneen, where the priest always 
found cordial hospitality. 

Rev. Frederick Wiechmann, of Wabash, was given charge 
of Warsaw in the spring of 1874. The necessity of a church 
was apparent, and he at once bought a piece of ground, 120x136 
feet on West Market street, for |800. The corner-stone for 
the present church was laid on June 1, 1876, and the edifice was 
solemnly dedicated, by Bishop Dwenger, on the feast of the 
Sacred Heart, in 1877. The church is built of brick, 40x96 
feet, in the Gothic style of architecture, with a spire 100 feet 
high. It has a seating capacity for 300 persons. The cost, 
including furniture, was |1 2,000. The number of souls at this 
time was about 120. In the autumn of 1877, Father Wiech- 
mann transferred his residence from Wabash to Warsaw, where, 
until September 1884, he lived in a rented house. He was the 



416 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

first and only resident pastor of Warsaw, attending also to 
Pierceton and Bourbon as missions. When in September 1884, 
Father Wiechmann was transferred to Anderson, the debt at 
Warsaw still amounted to $3,000. 

Rev. A. M. Ellering, who had his residence at Columbia 
City, was now given charge of Warsaw. The debt was too 
much for the poor people to pay, and with his Bishop's per- 
mission, Father Ellering took up collections in twenty-five 
churches, and house-to-house collections in twelve parishes, 
and within two years wiped out the entire debt. The pro- 
ceeds of a successful fair, in 1899, made some necessary im- 
provements on the church property possible. The number of 
souls is eighty-seven, consisting of seventeen families. One 
boy of the mission has become a priest. The League of the 
Sacred Heart has twenty-seven members. Warsaw is a mis- 
sion, attended from Columbia City on the fourth Sunday of 
every month, and occasionally on week days. 



MILLERSBURG. 

ST. henry's church. 

1879. 

The priests, whose names are on record as having attended 
to Millersburg, are: Rev. F. Holz, 1865 till 1866; Rev. A. B. 
Oechtering, 1866 till 1867; Rev. William Storr, 1867; Rev. 
D. Duehmig, 1867 till 1868; Rev. Henry Meissner, 1868 till 
1871; Father Duehmig again, 1871 till 1878; Rev. Henry A. 
Boeckelmann, 1878 till 1880; Rev. A. J. Kroeger, 1880 till 
1888; Rev. S. M. Yenn, 1888 till 1896; Rev. George Lauer, 
1896 till 1899; Rev. John F. Noll, 1899 till 1902; Rev. John C. 
Keller, 1902 till 1903; Rev. J. B. Fitzpatrick, since 1903. 
Millersburg was a station visited by the above priests until 
1879, when Father Boeckelmann, the pastor at Goshen, erected 
the present St. Henry's Church, a frame structure 26x45 feet. 
Jacob Rink donated the ground and much of the money ex- 
pended on the building. At the present time the mission is 
attended from Goshen once a month. The number of souls is 
only about forty. 



The Churches, Continued. 417 

SUMMIT. 

ST. Michael's church. 
li 



The present St. Michael's Church, at Summit, in Smith- 
field township of Dekalb county, was built in the spring of 1880, 
by Rev. August Young and was dedicated by Bishop Dwenger, 
on August 28, 1881. Its dimensions are 30x46 feet, with a 
seating capacity of 180. Father Young was relieved of the 
care of this mission by Rev. Peter Franzen, from January 20, 
1882 till May 11, 1883, when this young priest died at Waterloo, 
Indiana. Father Young continued to attend Summit, until 
July 4, 1884, when Rev. Maximilian Benzinger received charge 
and continued until October 17, 1897. The land, two acres, 
on which the church stands and an additional acre for cemetery 
purposes, were donated by John Matthias Schaudel, but his 
funeral was the first service held in the church and his burial, 
the first interment in the cemetery. 

In the year 1885, Father Benzinger built the present 
pastoral residence, at a cost of $1,400. The next pastor was 
Rev. Herman Juraschek, from November 12, 1897, till May 18, 
1899. The fourth resident pastor was Rev. Peter Schmitt. 
Since July 13, 1900, Summit has been a mission, attended by 
the pastor of Auburn, who visits it every Sunday, the weather 
permitting. Summit has forty-six Catholic families. There 
is no debt on the church property. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 

ST. Mary's of the presentation church. 

1883. 

In the year 1883, Rev. Joseph Uphaus, C. PP. S., pastor 
of Holy Trinity Church in Jay county, built a frame church 
three miles north of New Corydon. M. J. Kinney and M. 
Finerty donated four acres of land to be used for church pur- 
poses. In 1885, the church was destroyed by fire and in its 
place a brick church, 40x60 feet, costing |4,000 was erected. 
From the beginning until 1904, the pastors of Holy Trinity 
Church also attended St. Mary's Church, in Adams county; 
but since 1904 St. Mary's has Mass every Sunday and the 



418 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Rev. Vincent Munich, C. PP. S., has been its pastor, with his 
residence in the mission house in Jay county. 

St. Mary's has twenty-four families, numbering 126 souls. 
There is no debt on the church property. 



KOUTS. 

ST. Mary's church. 
1884. 

According to the memory of the oldest living Catholics at 
Kouts, Rev. Joseph Stephan was the first priest, who ministered 
to the spiritual wants of the few Catholics in the earliest history 
of Kouts and vicinity, celebrating Mass a few times in the old 
log-house of Anthony Dyszkiawicz. From August, 1864 until 
1883, Rev. Michael O'Reilly, pastor at Valparaiso, attended 
Kouts once in two months and then, till May 1887, once a 
month. The services were held, generally, in the house of 
Jerry McCarthy, one mile from town. In 1883, |700 were 
collected for the building of a church and a picnic for that 
purpose was held in 1884, whereupon Father O'Reilly bought 
the present church lots. Shortly after, the present church 
was built. When Father O'Reilly built the church, he intended 
it should later on be the school-house. After May 1887, Rev. 
C. Kobylinski attended Kouts two Sundays in the month, 
from North Judson. After him. Rev. John Frericks, C. PP. S., 
residing at Pulaski, visited the place a few times. Then came 
Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S., pastor at Wanatah, who 
visited the mission at regular intervals. During his pastorate 
a belfry was built, beside the church, and a bell put in. Since 
1894 Kouts has been a mission attended from Monterey: Rev. 
Charles Thiele, Rev. Gregory A. Zern and Rev. F. Joseph 
Bilstein, being the pastors. 

Kouts has thirty-one Catholic families, numbering 165 
souls. The League of the Sacred Heart has forty-six, the 
Rosary Society thirty-one, and the Altar Society twenty 
members. 

There is no debt on the church property. 

Mass is said in Kouts on the second and fifth Sundays of 
the month, and on Saturdays preceding the other Sundays. 



The Churches, Continued. 419 

WHEATFIELD. 

CHURCH OF THE SORROWFUL MOTHER. 
1886. 

Wheatfield was part of the so-called Indian Ridge, a trail 
used by the Pottawottamies from Valparaiso to Rensselaer. 
The land here belonged to the Kankakee swamp, and was 
reclaimed by tiling and ditching. The earliest settlers were 
Germans, from Pennsylvania, emigrants originally from Baden, 
on which account Wheatfield was known as "Das Badische 
Settlement." Without doubt, some of the earlier missionaries 
came through these regions, but the first priest, whose name 
is on record as having visited the scattered farmers around 
Wheatfield, was Rev. Joseph Stephan who came from San 
Pierre, in 1872. He celebrated Mass on occasion of these 
visits in the log-house of William Grube. For a few years 
from 1880, Franciscan Fathers from Lafayette attended 
Wheatfield. They said Mass in the Eagle Hotel. The Fathers, 
whose names are remembered by the early settlers are: Fathers 
John and Ignatius. 

The succession of priests, who attended Wheatfield from 
1886 till the present time, is as follows: Rev. Dominic Shunk, 
C. PP. S., Wanatah, 1886 till October 1895; Rev. Alphonse M. 
Grussi, C. PP. S., from October 1895 till 1897; Rev. Frank 
Schalk, C. PP. S., from 1897 till February 1898; Rev. Peter 
Kahellek, from February 12, 1898 till June 1898; Rev. Andrew 
Gietl, C. PP. S., from June to September 1898; Rev. 
Frederick Koenig, Lowell, from September 1898 till 
August 6, 1905; Fathers C. PP. S., since August 1905, 
under the direction of F'ather Gietl. These Fathers 
were resident at the so-called Indian School, near St. 
Joseph's College. Father Shunk, in 1886, organized the 
congregation at Wheatfield, and constructed a log church, 
12x16 feet, and dedicated it to the patronage of the Sorrowful 
Mother. At that time the parish consisted of six families. 
He attended from Wanatah, a distance of thirty miles. Some 
of the people had to come ten miles to hear Mass. Two years 
and a half were spent in this block church for divine services, 
after which Father Shunk built the present church, at a cost 
of |1,400. At this time the congregation consisted of twelve 



420 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

families, ten German, one Irish and one French. The church 
is a frame structure, and can accommodate 150 persons. 
Father Grussi, in his time, improved the church property at a 
cost of 1^400. The number of famihes at present is twenty- 
five, and the number of souls eighty-seven. Services are held 
here twice a month, by Fathers C. PP. S., from the "Indian 
School." Bishop Rademacher visited Wheatfield, and admin- 
istered Confirmation there, in 1895. When attending Wheat- 
field, the priest occupies a room in a private house, which was 
furnished by the parish, in 1906. There is here a Ladies' 
Altar Society, since 1905, with thirty members, and a Men's 
Society is about to be organized. Four of the families, belong- 
ing to this parish, live in Wheatfield, the rest live at a distance 
of from four to ten miles from town. There is no debt on the 
church property. 

.A.t the present time, Rev. Alphonse Mueller, C. PP. S., 
attends Wheatfield from the "Indian School." 



HAMLET. 

HOLY CROSS CHURCH. 
1890. 

The church property, at Hamlet, consists of one-half acre 
of ground, and was bought by Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S. 
The church was built by the same Father, in September 1890. 
It cost |1,231.50, including pews and bell. It has a seating 
capacity of sixty, and the total number of souls is about fifty- 
eight, or ten families. 

This mission was attended by priests, residing at Wanatah, 
as follows: Rev. Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S., from January 3, 
1891 till March 1, 1897; Rev. Edward Jakob, C. PP. S., until 
September 1897; Rev. Raymond Vernimont, till January 18, 
1898; Rev. Adam Buchheit, till September 10, 1899. The 
following priests who visited Hamlet, resided at Walkerton: 
Rev. Henry C. Kappel till July 18, 1901; Rev. Peter A. Budnik 
till June 5, 1902; Rev. Joseph Abel, who has been the visiting 
pastor, since June 5, 1902. There is no debt on the church 
property. 



The Churches, Continued. All 

ROLLING PRAIRIE. 

ST. JOHN CANTIUS' CHURCH. 

189L 

The present church was built in 1891, by Rev. W. Zborow- 
ski, the resident pastor of Terre Coupee. Rolling Prairie is a 
mission, visited regularly by the pastor of Terre Coupee. The 
intention is to build a new church in the near future, the present 
structure having been intended for a school, when it was built. 
The congregation has sixty families, or 278 souls. There is no 
debt on the church. 



ROME CITY. 

ST. Peter's church. 

1891. 

Tradition has it, that the early missionary Fathers offici- 
ated in these parts, on their way from Detroit to Vincennes, 
but there is no record of such visits. It was in the year 1891, 
that Rev. Dominic Duehmig, pastor at .Avilla, took steps 
towards providing the summer resort, for such Rome City had 
become, with church conveniences. He collected the necessary 
funds from the cottagers around Sylvan Lake, and bought two 
lots in Rome City, for which he paid $425. On these lots he 
erected a church costing $3,239.78, a miniature reproduction of 
the famous St. Peter's in Rome, Italy. Rome City is a mission 
attended from Kendall ville. It has five families, numbering 
fifteen souls. The debt on the church property is $475. 



ALB.'XNY. 

ST. Anthony's church. 
1895. 

The church at Albany was built in the summer of 1895, 
when Rev. Constantine iMaujay, residing at Portland, had 
charge of the place. Before that time Rev. .Anthony J. Strue- 
der, resident pastor at Portland, visited Albany and celebrated 
Mass in private houses. The two lots, on which the church 
stands, are located in the eastern part of town, and were 
donated by the Cincinnati Syndicate Land Company. The 



422 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

church itself, a frame building of 30x50 feet, has traces of 
Gothic architecture about it and cost probably over |1,500. 
The furniture is very good, and everything necessary has been 
supplied. The seating capacity is about 125. When Dunkirk 
received a resident pastor, Albany was attached to it; so that 
Rev. William S. Hogan attended Albany from March 1900 till 
September 7, 1902. At present, the very few Catholics re- 
maining attend Mass at Dunkirk having the facilities of the 
interurban electric road. 



GENEVA. 

ST. Joseph's church. 
1895. 

The erection of St. Joseph's Church was begun in July 
1895, by Rev. Constantine Maujay, and was dedicated by 
Bishop Rademacher, on October 13, of the same year. One 
hundred and twenty-five dollars was paid for two lots, and the 
church building itself cost $1,000. The furnishings of the 
church amounted to |600. The church property is free from 
debt. 

St. Joseph's Church, at Geneva, was always a mission 
attended by the pastors of Portland : Rev. Constantine Maujay, 
till October 1900; Rev. J. P. Lasher, from November 25, 1900 
till July 1, 1901; Rev. Thomas M. Conroy, from July 1, 1901 
to July 1, 1902; Rev. L. R. Paquet, from July 1902 to February 
1904; Rev. Paulinus Trost, C. PP. S., from March 1904 to July 
1904; Rev. Lawrence A. Eberle, since July 3, 1904. At present 
the membership of St. Joseph's congregation consists of only 
two families. 



CULVER. 

ST, .Mary's of the lake church. 

1897. 

Culver is a town situated near Lake Maxinkuckee, a popular 
summer resort of great beauty. It takes its name from the 
Culver Military Academy. Before the establishment of this 
institution it was known as Marmont. A neat little church 
was erected in the spring of 1897, and was dedicated on July 4, 



The Churches, Continued. 423 

of the same year. It cost about $800, and was built under the 
superintendence of Rev. Charles *Thiele, pastor of Monterey, 
of which place Culver is a mission. During the summer months 
services are held here on three Sundays of the month. 

In 1906 the building was totally destroyed by fire, and 
will likely be rebuilt in the near future. 



VEEDERSBURG. 

ST. Mary's church. 
1897. 

Veedersburg has been a mission attended from Covington, 
since Covington has had a resident pastor. The church grounds 
consist of one lot, 66x132 feet, donated by James Sullivan. 
Before the erection of the church, Mass was celebrated in a 
public hall. The church is a frame structure with a brick 
basement, 26x75 feet, built in 1897, when Rev. John Tremmel 
had charge, at a cost of about |2,000. The seating capacity is 
150. At the present time the parish has eleven families, or 
twenty-eight souls. The mission is attended on two Sundays 
of the month. The debt on the church property is §150. 



RED KEY. 

ST. Patrick's church, 

1898. 



In the beginning. Red Key was called Mount Vernon. 
About the year 1877, perhaps five Catholic families lived here, 
and Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan attended the place from Union 
City bimonthly, as did Rev. .\nthony J. Strueder and Rev. 
Constantine Maujay, from Portland. These priests celebrated 
Mass either at Patrick Grady's house or in a rented hall. 

The church lot in Red Key is on North Meridian street. 
The church is a very plain frame building, 30x40 feet, and 
was erected in the spring of 1898 at a cost of $800, during the 
time, when Father Maujay had charge of the place. The 
Catholic population at this time was about ten families. When 
Dunkirk received a resident pastor. Red Key was attached to 
it; so that Rev. William S. Hogan attended Red Key, from 
March 1900 till September 7, 1902. At the present time. 



424 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

since September 7, 1902, Rev. John C. Wakefer, pastor at 
Dunkirk, visits Red Key on the first Sunday of every month. 
There are ten families at present, numbering forty souls. The 
seating capacity of the church is 100. There is no debt on 
the church property. 



MOROCCO. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 
1899. 

Rev. F. Joseph Bilstein had charge of Morocco, during his 
pastorate at St. Anthony's, from February 1898 till October 
1900. He built the present church at Morocco. At the 
present time, the congregation numbers three families, or 
fourteen souls. Morocco was attended from St. Anthony's 
until Goodland received a resident pastor, when it became a 
mission attached to Goodland. Rev. I. F. Zircher attends 
the place at the present time. 



KNIMAN. 

ST. Michael's church. 

1900. 

In the year 1900, Very Rev. John H. Guendling, being 
Administrator of the diocese, the eleven Catholic families in 
Kniman and vicinity applied for permission, to erect a church 
in Kniman. Up to this time, they had been members of the 
Wheatfield congregation. Rev. B. Kroeger, of Logansport, 
having been directed to investigate, reported favorably on 
the building of a church. Rev. F. Koenig, of Lowell, had charge 
of Kniman, from 1898 till August 6, 1905. A half acre of 
ground was bought for |75. The church is a frame church, 
having a seating capacity for 200, and cost $1,300. The 
dedication took place, on June 24, 1901, Rev. M. Zumbuelte 
officiating. Since August 1905, the Fathers C. PP. S., of the 
"Indian School," of which Rev. A. Gietl, C. PP. S., is the 
Superior, visits the place twice a month. Only one Catholic 



The Churches, Continued . 425 

family is living in Kniman itself, but twelve families are mem- 
bers of the congregation: eight German, two Polish, two 
French. The total number of souls is sixty-eight. At the 
present time, Rev. Alphonse Mueller, C. PP. S., attends Kniman, 
The church property is not yet out of debt. 



OTTERBEIN. 

ST. CHARLES' CHURCH. 
1902. 

Previous to the year 1902, the Catholics of Otterbein were 
obliged to attend to their religious duties, either at Oxford 
or Barrydale, but upon the arrival of Rev. Charles E. McCabe, 
as pastor at Barrydale, having charge also of Otterbein, steps 
were taken, with the consent of Bishop Alerding, towards the 
organization of a parish and the building of a church. The 
non-Catholic citizens of Otterbein contributed $1,000. The 
corner-stone of the new church was laid by Rev. John R. 
Dinnen, on October 6, 1901, in the presence of fully 2,000 
people. In June 1902 the Church was dedicated by Bishop 
Alerding. St. Charles' Church is a brick edifice of Gothic 
design, and as it stands today, complete in every respect, 
represents an expenditure of $9,000. The debt on the church 
property is |406. The frescoe work is well done. The Sacred 
Heart of Jesus, the Immaculate Conception, St. Patrick, St. 
Charles, St. Helena and St. Cecelia, are represented on the 
stained glass windows. 

The members of St. Charles' Parish cherish fond hopes 
that, one day, side by side with the beautiful church, they may 
be able to erect a suitable priest's house and have a resident 
pastor. Otterbein has thirty-five families, numbering 145 souls. 
The Societies are: The Rosary Society, for married and single 
women, twenty-five members; the Holy Name Society, for 
single men and boys, fifteen members; the Children of Mary, 
twelve members; and the Catholic Order of Foresters, forty 
members. Otterbein is a mission attended from Barrydale, on 
every Sunday and Holyday, from Easter to Christmas, and on 
every other Sunday, from Christmas to Easter. 



426 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

WOODVILLE. 

CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

1902. 

The corner-stone of this church was laid, by Rev, P. J. 
Crosson, having been delegated by the Bishop, on May 27, 
1902, assisted by Rev. James M. Walsh. The dedication of 
the same took place, on October 5, of the same year. The 
President of the Georgetown University, Father Doherty, 
officiated at the dedication, and the Jesuit, Father Sherman, 
preached the sermon. The principal benefactor of the church 
was the Hon. Patrick O'Donnell, who donated the ground, on 
which the church stands, and $5,000 in cash, the cost of the 
church was $9,000; the present debt is $900. 

Woodville is attended from St. Vincent de Paul's Church, 
Logansport. 



EAST CHICAGO. 

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH. 
1907. 

Holy Trinity Congregation, in East Chicago, is composed 
of Slavo-Hungarian Catholics, and was organized in 1906. .A 
very creditable, brick church, costing $10,000, was erected in 
the fall of 1906. Rev. Benedict M. Rajcany is the founder of 
the congregation, and attends it from St. John's Church in 
North Hammond. 



BUNKER HILL. 
ST. Michael's church. 

With the construction of the railroad from IndianapoHs 
came the first Catholics to Bunker Hill and vicinity in 1857 or 
1858. The Rev. Bernard J. Force, of Peru, had charge of 
them, paying occasional visits and celebrating Mass in private 
houses. In 1864, there were about ten families in a scattered 
neighborhood southwest of Bunker Hill. In 1865, Rev. Ber- 
nard Kroeger, who had charge of Peru, Kokomo, Marion, 
Tipton and elsewhere, also attended Bunker Hill. With his 
own hands he constructed an altar in a private house. During 



The Churches, Continued. 427 

four or five years he visited here- four or five times a year. 
After a lapse of about ten years a lot was bought, on which 
stood a small room, which had served as a shoemaker shop. 
This room was fitted up and used as a church for many years. 
Having been attended as a mission from Peru, it was now 
attached to Marion, and visited by Revs. Crawley, Twigg, 
Kelly, Strueder and Grogan. The present church was erected 
in 1879. Since 1886, the mission has been attended from 
Kokomo, by Rev. F. Lordemann. For a period of ten years 
the little congregation was prosperous. At present it has no 
more than three of four families. 



ROYAL CENTRE. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH. 

The congregation at Royal Centre, which at one time gave 
promise of a flourishing parish, has at the present date dwindled 
down to four families. The pastor at Pulaski visits the place, 
about every six or seven weeks, to give opportunity to receive 
the sacraments. The church is in need of repairs and efforts 
are being made with the aid of special generosity, on the part 
of the few Catholics remaining, to have them attended to in 
the near future. 



WINCHESTER. 
ST, Joseph's church. 

It was at the home of Patrick McDonald, who settled at 
Winchester, in 1854, that Rev. Daniel Maloney, coming from 
Indianapolis, offered the Holy Sacrifice; and he continued to 
do so from time to time. Rev. Michael Clark, believing that 
Winchester would become the home of many Catholic families, 
determined to reside here and secured much of the material 
necessary for the building of a church and priest's house. 
When several Catholic families moved away from Winchester, 
he gave up the idea of becoming a resident pastor. 

Winchester was a mission attended from Union City after 
the departure of Father Clark, by Rev. John McMahon, Rev. 
Martin Noll, Rev. Jeremiah Quinlan, Rev. Francis A. King, 
Rev. M. J. Byrne and Rev. John P. Durham. During the 



428 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

illness of Father King the mission was in charge of Rev. Con- 
stantine Maujay, Rev. Thomas M. Conroy and Rev. L. R. 
Paquet of Portland. The church is a frame structure, 30x48 
feet, well furnished and frescoed. It was erected by Father 
Quinlan and frescoed by Father Byrne. Father Durham put 
upon it some necessary improvements. The number of families 
at the present time is about ten. 



KNOX. 

The Rev. Joseph Stephan, then residing at the "Indian 
School," Rensselaer, was, far as known, the first priest to visit 
Knox. After him Rev. George Fleisch, C. PP. S., of Monterey 
visited it about three times a year, celebrating Mass in the 
Army Hall, and in private houses. For six years Rev. Charles 
Thiele of Monterey, and then Rev. John Kubacki of North 
Judson for one year, and Rev. Peter Kahellek for one year, 
the latter two residing at North Judson, visited this station. 
Rev. H. C. Kappel, residing at Walkerton, attended Knox 
from September 1899 to July 1901, and Rev. Peter Budnik 
until June 1902, and after him Rev. Joseph Abel, until the 
present time. The number of souls is thirty-eight. Despite 
this small number, plans are being prepared for the building 
of a church, in the near future. 



MATTHEWS. 

A STATION. 



Matthews is a station in charge of the pastor of Fairmount, 
who celebrates Mass there, twice a month. The Rev. L. R. 
Paquet was the first priest to visit Matthews, regularly. There 
are at present three Catholic families there. Mass is celebrated 
in a hall, rented for that purpose. 



CHAPTER XVI. 



RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF MEN. 



THE CONGREGATION OF HOLY CROSS (c. S. C.)* 
1842. 

A Golden Jubilee is one of the occasions upon which a 
strain of eulogy is admittedly congruous to voice or pen. 
Mere self-glorification, the boastfulness of pretentious vanity 
is indeed perenially censurable; but the symmetrical rounding- 
out of a man's, or an institution's, full half-century of benefi- 
cent activity amply justifies the accents of panegyric in re- 
counting the virtues of the one or in recapitulating the glories 
of the other. In the case of the fiftieth anniversary of a diocese, 
many of whose founders and builders have gone to the reward 
of their zealous labors, there needs no other warrant for en- 
comiastic tributes than the scriptural counsel: "Praise we 
now the men of renown, our fathers in their generation." It 
will accordingly be not only permissable, but thoroughly in 
harmony with the purpose of this commemorative volume, to 
record herein the narrative of a district, the possession of 
which within its boundaries constitutes for the diocese of Fort 
Wayne a glory greater than accrues to any other see in this 
country, not to say the major part of the Catholic world. 

Even apart from its specific appropriateness to the present 
history, the tale of Notre Dame's humble foundation, rapid 
growth, and marvellous development is the story which, as 
illustrating the filial reliance of one Knight of Mary on the 
protecting care of the Mother whom he loved so tenderly, and 
as emphasizing the congruousness of unlimited trust in the 
Blessed Virgin, can scarcely be told too often. It is a story 
of notable deeds performed by men of faith; an account of 



*By Rev. Arthur Barry O'Neill, C. S. C. 



430 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

Herculean labors undertaken with an eye single to the glory 
of God and His gracious Mother; a record of zeal rewarded, 
of sacrifices blest, of love triumphant over every obstacle. 

Sixty-five years ago, when a poor young foreign missionary 
priest and five poor foreign religious Brothers settled in Northern 
Indiana upon an uncultivated tract of forest land, with naught 
but a little rude log cabin to distinguish it from the merest 
sylvan wilderness, confidence in the Mother of God, supple- 
mented by their individual labors, was the only capital they 
had to invest in the arduous enterprise of founding in this 
Western country a shrine of religious education. No princely 
endowments, no munificent donations of a million dollars, or 
a hundred thousand, or a thousand, came to accelerate their 
material prosperity; and yet never did dollars and cents in- 
vested in a business venture yield such magnificent results as 
have sprung from their steadfast reliance on our Lady's aid, 
and their constant endeavors to procure her favor. Much is 
written from time to time of the wondrous development, 
especially since 1871, of the great Western metropolis; but 
stupendous as has been the growth of the old-time village by 
Lake Michigan that has come to be Chicago, the political 
economist, taking account of merely human resources, will 
find it an easier matter to explain that growth, than to assign 
the causes of the marvellous transformation, that has made of 
the barren wilderness on the banks of the St. Joseph River the 
most splendid sanctuary of religion and science to be found on 
the continent. The true explanation is beyond the economist: 
Notre Dame was built with "Hail Marys." 

Essential to a proper understanding of what has been 
accomplished in this garden-spot of the Church in America is 
a brief account of the religious family that has attended to its 
cultivation. The Congregation of Holy Cross was in its incep- 
tion, a by-product of the great French Revolution, or, rather, 
of the reaction from the frenzied hatred of religion and religious 
education that marked the decade, from the meeting of the 
States General in 1789 to the end of the Directory in 1799. As 
at present constituted, the Congregation is the result of Rome's 
officially uniting two distinct societies, the Brothers of St. 
Joseph, founded at Ruille in 1820, and the Auxiliary Priests of 
Mans, established in 1835. 



I 



Religious Communiiies, Continued. 431 

An excellent summary of the purposes and activities of 
the amalgamated associations is given in the following letter, 
dated May 4, 1840, and addressed to Pope Gregory XVI by 
Mgr. Bouvier, Bishop of Mans: 

"Basil Anthony Moreau, honorary canon, and former pro- 
fessor of theology and holy scripture in our diocesan seminary, 
has, with the consent of the present bishop, established a house* 
near the city of Mans, and has there assembled certain priests 
burning with love for souls and enamored of poverty and 
obedience, who follow the community life under his direction, 
and are always ready to announce the word of God, to hear 
confessions, to conduct retreats for communities, etc. They 
are called Auxiliary Priests and are already fifteen in number. 
They live on voluntary offerings and on the profits accruing 
from the board and tuition of a hundred pupils. 

"As the Brothers of the Christian Doctrine do not under- 
take the charge of establishments unless they can live at least 
three together and receive an annual salary of six hundred 
francs each, they cannot be procured for schools in the country 
parishes and the small towns. A pious pastor of Ruille, James 
Francis Dujarief, about the year 1820 gathered into his pres- 
bytery a number of virtuous young men, kept them at his own 
expense, taught them, and prepared them to become primary 
teachers for the parishes in which the services of the Christian 
Brothers were unattainable. Thus were founded the Brothers 
of St. Joseph. 

"The present Bishop of Mans, seeing that the novitiate of 
these Brothers could not be suitably maintained in the country 
district, took measures to transfer them to the episcopal city. 
With the consent of the founder who was still alive, though 
weighed down with infirmities, he gave to the congregation as 
Superior the aforenamed Fr. Moreau. The latter, having 
nothing in view but the good of religion, assumed the heavy 
burden and united the novitiate to the Auxiliary Priests. 
Thus there are now in the same house the Auxiliary Priests, 
the pupils, the novice Brothers, and the teachers. This new 
institute already numbers eighty persons scattered through 
thirty-nine establishments, and forty-five novices. Yesterday 



*In the commune of Holy Cross, whence the name of ihe Congregation. 
tFounder also of the Sisters of Providence. 



432 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

three Brothers under the direction of one of the priests, set out 
to build up an establishment in Algeria, Africa, and others will 
soon be sent to the diocese of Vincennes in America." 

The concluding sentence of Bishop Bouvier's letter affords 
the natural transition from the history of the Congregation's 
origin in the old world to the story of its initial activities in 
the new. Some years prior to the date of the foregoing letter, 
Vincennes' first bishop, Mgr. Brute of saintly memory, had 
made earnest and eloquent appeals in different diocesan sem- 
inaries of France for missionaries to aid him in the arduous 
work of spreading the gospel through Indiana; and his suc- 
cessor, Bishop de la Hailandiere, had, in 1839, specifically 
pleaded with Fr. Moreau for volunteers from the ranks of Holy 
Cross to work on the American mission. Volunteers were not 
wanting, but lack of material resources prevented for some 
months the execution of the desired project, the migration 
across the Atlantic of some priests and Brothers of the youthful 
religious family of Holy Cross. Not, indeed, till a year after 
the date of Bishop Bouvier's communication to Rome, did- 
Mgr. de la Hailandiere receive the assurance that his hopes 
were about to be realized. In the summer of 1841 there came 
to him a letter from the young priest whom Fr. Moreau, with 
admirable, not to say prophetic, provision, had selected as 
leader of the American mission band. A brief extract from 
this hitherto unpublished letter merits reproduction here, as 
showing the quality of its author and the sentiments with 
which he looked forward to a life that humanly speaking, 
could scarcely be other than one of exile, privation, unceasing 
toil, and infrequent consolations: 

"Never has Divine Providence appeared to me so kind, 
so merciful, so lovable; never has my heart been so touched 
with His goodness and so happy, as since I have learned that 
it is I whom He has deigned to select in order to give your 
Lordship one more priest to labor in your immense diocese 
for the glory of God and the salvation of souls. Would that 
I had been able, Monseigneur, to announce to you my happiness 
long before this, and to have sooner relieved your own anxious 
uncertainty with respect to our Community; but we had per- 
force to await the manifestation of Heaven's will. Personally, 
I have not the slightest doubt of that will. It seems to me 



Religious Communities, Continued. 433 

that our Good Master is leading _me towards you by the hand, 
as it were; and 'tis this that fills me with ineffable joy." 

To the letter from which the foregoing paragraph has been 
extracted there was signed the name of a young Levite just 
twenty-seven years old, whose ordination as a priest of Holy 
Cross had taken place three years before. While his exemplary 
piety, his burning zeal, and his intellectual equipment justified 
his Superiors in expecting notable results from his labors in 
the field to which they appointed him, it is extremely doubtful 
whether Fr. Moreau who sent, or Bishop de la Hailandiere who 
received him, had formed at that time any measurably adequate 
idea of the magnitude which those results were to assume, 
even during the Levite's lifetime. Read by the Bishop of 
Vincennes in 1841, the young missionary's name told little or 
nothing; read today, in the light of two-thirds of a century's 
experience, that name connotes a heroic figure in the history 
of the Church in America; a foremost champion of the twin 
causes that make for the permanent prosperity of our Republic, 
religion and education; and one of the most loving, dauntless, 
and victorious Knights of Our Lady that ever wore her colors 
and extended her sway in this Western hemisphere, Fr. Edward 
Sorin, Founder of Notre Dame. 

Accompanied by six brothers, Fr. Sorin took passage, in 
August, 1841, in the steerage of the packet boat Iowa at Havre; 
reached New York on September 13th; said his first Mass in the 
new world on the next day, by a happy coincidence the Feast 
of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross; and, proceeding by canal 
boat and stage coach, finally reached Vincennes on the second 
Sunday of October. An incident deservedly mentioned by all 
chroniclers of the arrival of Holy Cross' pioneer priest in America 
is his first act on landing at New York; he fell on his knees 
and, as earnest of his unswerving fealty to the country of his 
adoption, devoutly kissed the soil. In a similar spirit, he 
concluded his first letter to Fr. Moreau with — "Here is the 
adoption of my inheritance; here will I dwell all the days of 
my life." 

The activities of the Holy Cross missionaries during their 
first year in Indiana found their scope at St. Peter's, twenty- 
seven miles east of Vincennes; but the religious were perma- 
nently settled only in the following year, 1842. Bishop de la 



434 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Hailandiere proffered to the Community, and Fr. Sorin grate- 
fully accepted, a tract of land near the village of South Bend 
on the St. Joseph River. The gift was subject to two con- 
ditions: That a college and a novitiate should be built within 
two years; and that the Indians and the white settlers in the 
neighboring districts should receive Fr. Sorin's sacerdotal 
ministry. The acceptance of the gift definitely fixed the resi- 
dence of the Congregation in a territory which, a decade and a 
half later was to form a portion of the new diocese of Fort 
Wayne. 

Of the territory in question, the author of "The Priests 
of Holy Cross"* gives the following interesting historical 
sketch: "Over this ground passed the saintly Marquette more 
than two hundred years ago and in an unknown grave some- 
where along the banks of the St. Joseph's River a mile away 
sleeps the ashes of the great Allouez. La Salle and Tonty and 
the picturesque Hennepin wandered through these woods, and 
within a short afternoon's journey from Notre Dame is the site 
of the old fort St. Joseph where was fought a brief but terrible 
battle in the days of discovery. In 1831 Fr. Stephen Theodore 
Badin, the first priest ordained in the United States, purchased 
a section of land surrounding the twin lakes with the express 
design of holding it as the site for a future Catholic college, and 
in 1836 he had given it to the Bishop of Vincennes to be used 
for that purpose. Fr. Badin had made Notre Dame a centre 
of missionary activity throughout Northern Indiana and 
Southern Michigan, and his successor Fr. Deseille, following in 
the footsteps of the zealous proto-priest, had made his home 
for five years in a room of the little chapel of the mission. In 
the autumn of 1837, however, this holy missionary fell into a 
mortal illness. * * * An hour before he breathed his last 
he had himself lifted from his deathbed and borne in the arms 
of his sorrowing Indians to the chapel. Still supported on 
either side, he had strength enough to clasp the key of the 
tabernacle in his trembling fingers and to administer to him- 
self the Holy Viaticum. 

"The next apostle of Notre Dame was Fr. Benjamin Petit. 
Two days after his ordination he was sent to 'succeed a saint,' 
as Bishop Brute told him in commissioning him to take up the 

*Rev. John Cavanaugh. C. S. C. 



Religious Communities, Continued. 435 

work of Fr. Deseille. Of all the early missionaries this brilliant 
and magnetic young priest was most affectionately regarded 
by both the settlers and the Indians; and when he died, scarcely 
twelve months after his ordination, he was loved as Fr. Sorin 
tells us, 'as none of his predecessors, excellent as they were, 
had ever been loved.' " 

To the district thus consecrated by the labors of zealous 
pioneer missionaries, and redolent of hallowed memories of 
saintly confessors and quasi-martyrs, came, then, in 1842, the 
builder of the later Notre Dame, no unworthy successor to 
even the holiest and hardiest of those who had gone before him. 
His own account of his arrival reads less like the description 
of an Indiana journey of only sixty-five years ago than of an 
event at least thrice as far distant "in the dark backward and 
abysm of time." 

"We started (from St. Peter's) on the 16th of November," 
he wrote, "and indeed, it required no little courage to under- 
take the journey at such a season. I cannot but admire the 
sentiments with which it pleased God to animate our little band, 
who had more than one hundred miles to travel through the 
snow. The first day the cold was so intense that we could 
advance only about five miles. The weather did not moderate 
for a moment; each morning the wind seemed more piercing 
as we pushed forward on our journey due north. But God 
was with us. None of us suffered severely, and at length, on 
the eleventh day after our departure, five of us arrived at 
South Bend, the three others being obliged to travel more 
slowly with the ox team transporting our effects. 

"A few hours afterwards we came to Notre Dame du Lac. 
Everything was frozen and yet it all appeared so beautiful. 
The lake, particularly, with its mantel of snow resplendent in 
its whiteness, was to us a symbol of the stainless purity of our 
august Lady whose name it bears, and also of the purity of 
soul which should characterize the new dwellers on these 
beautiful shores. Our lodgings appeared to us — as indeed 
they are— but little different from those at St. Peter's. We 
made haste to inspect on the banks of the lakes the various 
sites which had been so highly praised. Yes, like little children, 
we went from one extremity to the other, in spite of the cold, 
perfectly enchanted with the marvellous beauties of our new 



436 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

abode. Oh, may this Eden ever be the home of innocence 
and virtue! Once again in our life we felt that Providence had 
been good to us, and we blessed God with all our hearts." 

The detailed story of the development of Notre Dame from 
the creation of the first college building, the corner-stone of 
which was laid in August, 1843, to the magnificent group of 
more than a score of handsome edifices — collegiate church; 
central administration building; residence halls; institutes of 
science, technology, and electrical and mechanical engineering; 
theatre; gymnasium; provincial residence; seminary; novitiate; 
community house; printing offices; and half a dozen accessory 
structures — would occupy many times the space alloted to 
this chapter. The most that can be attempted is a rigidly 
summarized account of this gratifying growth and a brief 
mention of the especially notable events in the history of the 
University. Sadly prominent among these latter is the epi- 
demic of cholera that ravaged the ranks of the Community in 
1854, carrying off the members with a rapidity and a violence 
that threatened the total extinction of Holy Cross in America. 
It was a trial calculated permanently to discourage any leader 
of less than heroic mould; but, indomitable in his zeal for 
God's glory, and supremely confident in the unfailing assistance 
and protection of his Heavenly Mother, Fr. Sorin not only 
preserved his own courage but effectively rallied the drooping 
spirits of all his surviving co-workers, and the work of growth 
and expansion went on uninterruptedly. 

Eleven years after the cholera scourge, this expansion 
justified the erection of a new and a more commodious college 
building. Begun in 1865, it was completed early in the follow- 
ing year, and was dedicated on May 31, 1866, by Archbishop 
Spalding of Baltimore. The new edifice, a hundred and sixty 
feet long by eighty feet in width, was six stories high, and was 
surmounted by a colossal statue of Our Lady. These ampler 
accommodations were taken advantage of by a steadily in- 
creasing number of students, and the annals of the following 
thirteen years record a tale of continuous progress and pros- 
perity. 

In 1879, however, the tale takes on another and a more 
sombre hue. On April 23, of that year, occurred a disastrous 
fire which in a few hours reduced to ashes not only the main 



Religious Communities, Continued. 437 

university structure but almost every other building in its 
immediate neighborhood. Apart from the destruction of much 
that money could never replace, the financial loss was, to a 
religious community, tremendous; and the available insurance 
was trifling. The way in which the disaster was met illustrates, 
better than would do pages of analytical exposition, the spirit 
that has ever dominated the builders of Notre Dame, and 
furnishes the key to the undeniably magnificent success that 
has crowned their efforts. With whole-hearted devotedness 
and whole-souled devotion they worked and prayed, nay, 
rather, they prayed and worked. The first gift towards the 
building of a new university that Fr. Sorin received — it was a 
check for one thousand dollars — he sent to a priest in a distant 
city with a request for prayers and Masses in behalf of Notre 
Dame. Trust in Providence and in Our Lady was accompanied, 
in those heart-rending April days of 1879 as always in the history 
of the Congregation, by untiring personal exertion on the part 
of all its members. Before the ashes of the old buildings were 
cold the work of constructing the new ones was begun; and in 
September of the same year they were opened to a larger number 
of students than the fire had dispersed. 

Since 1879, no untoward event has occurred to arrest the 
progress of the University, whose teaching faculty of more 
than three score members now proffer to a body of students 
numbering from seven to eight hundred no fewer than thirteen 
collegiate courses — in classics, letters, economics and history, 
journalism, art, science, pharmacy, law, engineering (civil, 
mechanical, chemical and electrical), and architecture, in 
addition to thorough preparatory and commercial courses. 

It is certainly not strange that, looking upon the material 
evidences of the success which has so abundantly crowned the 
faith and zeal of Fr. Sorin and of his co-laborers and successors 
among the Fathers and Brothers of Holy Cross, men competent 
to speak authoritatively on the subject, have repeatedly 
averred that the University of Notre Dame is not merely a 
peerless blessing and unrivalled glory to the diocese of Fort 
Wayne, but the greatest tribute which the Western hemisphere 
has thus far ofi'ered to the Blessed Virgin. In very truth, the 
star-crowned colossal statue of Our Lady, dominating at a 
height of more than two hundred feet the golden dome of the 



438 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

central edifice; the adjacent noble church, that treasure-house 
of religious art and beauty, from whose belfry a brazen-throated 
monster booms out the Angelus with an exultation that drowns 
the loudest shriek and roar of factory and railway; the number, 
variety, and thorough equipment of libraries, laboratories, 
halls, ancillary departments— these naturally impress the minds 
and are apt to elicit the enthusiastic praises of even the most 
transient visitors to Our Lady's Indiana home. 

And yet, without minimizing in any degree the true sig- 
nificance of the noble University— fully acknowledging, on the 
contrary, both the capital importance of the CathoHc education 
for which it stands, and the far-reaching beneficent influence 
of the thousands who have learned, and are learning, within 
its walls to combine practical virtue with intellectual develop- 
ment, — it may be questioned whether Fr. Sorin did not found 
a still greater work than the University, dower Fort Wayne 
with its most glorious possession, and estabUsh his own highest 
claim to the Blessed Virgin's favor when, in 1865, he began the 
publication of The Ave Maria. "They who declare me shall 
have life everlasting," was the significant text of the first 
sermon he ever preached on Our Blessed Lady; and assuredly 
through no other agency in either hemisphere during the past 
four decades have Mary's dignity and prerogatives, her beauty 
and her glory, the omnipotence of her supplication and the 
unfathomable depths of her compassionate tenderness, been 
declared so constantly and so adequately, with such loving 
enthusiasm and persuasive insistence, as through the salutary 
pages of that magazine, "devoted to the honor of the Blessed 
Virgin," and wearing as its appropriate title the Angel of the 
Incarnation's greeting to the Lily of Israel, the Judean Maiden 
"full of grace." 

The press in our day is rightly regarded as the university 
of the people; it is a perennial school and college from the 
influence of whose lessons and lectures no graduation-day will 
ever mark the people's deliverance. CathoHc journalism in 
particular has come to be regarded, notably during the pon- 
tificate of Leo XIII and that of our present Sovereign Pontiff 
Pius X., as an apostolate whose practical importance it is 
difficult to overestimate. Of late years the members of the 
hierarchy in frequent pastoral letters, and the ablest pastors 



Religious Communities, Continued. 439 

in occasional pulpit utterances, h^ve emphasized the duty, and, 
as a preservative of the faith, the quasi-necessity, binding the 
faithful to support the Catholic paper and magazine. Fr. 
Sorin, with the prevision of a seer, recognized the growing 
ascendancy of the press at a period when its coming dominance 
was not so patent as at present, and forthwith seized it as one 
of the engines with which he and his congregation should do 
mighty things for the glory of God, the honor of God's Mother, 
and the upbuilding of the Church in America. 

Of all the works of that venerable patriarch, the great good 
priest whose bronze counterfeit now meets one's gaze at the very 
entrance to Notre Dame, The Ave Maria has ever appeared to 
the mind of the present writer the very noblest, most blessed, 
and most meritorious; the worthiest of his offerings to his 
beloved Mother, and the Congregation of Holy Cross, most 
estimable service to the English-speaking Catholic world. It 
would be easy, were space available, to fortify this opinion 
with a wealth of testimony proffered by the prelates and the 
press of many climes, all certifying in terms of fervid eulogy 
to the notable excellence of this "ideal Catholic family maga- 
zine." Who, indeed, that even partially apprehends the import 
of the Catholic press in this day of virulant attacks on the 
faith from without, and, as Pius X has recently declared, of 
still more deplorable undermining of that faith by some of 
those within the fold; who that has seriously pondered the 
njagnitude of the results to religion and society involved in 
the nature of the household's reading, will venture to estimate 
the measure of good that has been, and is being, accomplished 
by the weekly visits of Our Lady's magazine to tens of thousands 
of Catholic homes in this republic and in many a land beyond 
the ocean! 

Any mention of this special glory of the Congregation of 
Holy Cross would be inadequate did it fail to note one particular 
in which the magazine differs from the University, as from 
other works of the Community. Founded, like them, by Fr. 
Sorin, it has developed and prospered under the direction of 
one mind rather than many. The University of Notre Dame, 
as it stands today, is the resultant achievement of successive 
presidents; Fathers Dillon and Corby, Lemonnier and Colovin, 
Walsh and Morrissey and Cavanaugh; The Ave Maria is vir- 



440 The Diocese of Fori Wayne. 

tually the work of one man, who has stood at its editorial 
helm for upwards of three decades, and has identified his life 
with its progress, Fr. Daniel E. Hudson. 

Not that either the editor of The Ave Maria, or any one of 
the presidents just mentioned would dream of arrogating to 
himself alone the credit of the good accomplished and the 
success achieved. Devoted and energetic co-workers they all 
have had, not only in their fellow priests and the lay and 
teaching Brothers of the Congregation, but in the Sisters of 
Holy Cross as well. While the specific story of these Sisters 
will be found in another chapter of this book, the symmetry 
of the present chapter would be sadly imperfect, and the story 
of Notre Dame be lamentably incomplete if brief reference at 
least were not made to the genuinely important, if congruously 
unobtrusive, role played in that story by these self sacrificing 
daughters of Father Sorin. In the composing room of The 
Ave Maria, as in St. Edward's Hall of the University, in laundry 
and kitchen and infirmary and sewing room, they have, all 
through the years of Notre Dame's trials and triumphs, con- 
tributed their full share of cordial sympathy, ungrudging work, 
and efficacious prayer. 

So, too, of the Brothers of Holy Cross. A constituent 
element of the Congregation — numerically, indeed, its larger 
element — Notre Dame owes to their devotedness and their 
spirit of self-sacrifice far more than thrusts itself upon tl^e 
notice of the superficial observer. Inconspicuous as the 
majority, especially of the lay Brothers, uniformly appeared; 
as hidden from the public gaze as are the stokers of a mammoth 
ocean liner, — they have, throughout every decade since the 
winter of 1842, done valiant work not less essential to the rise 
and progress of Notre Dame than is the stoker's activity to 
the speeding of the steamship. Not only in class-room and 
study-hall, in students' office and on the campus, in residence 
halls and dormitories, in press rooms and publishing offices, 
but on the farm and in the garden, in sacristy and store, and 
in each of the score of different trades and handicrafts, the 
Brothers of Holy Cross have superabundantly justified both 
the wisdom of their original union with the Fathers of the Con- 
gregation, and the foresight of Father Sorin in counting largely 



Religious Communities, Conitnued. 441 

upon them for the assistance imperatively needed in the pros- 
ecution of his Hfe work. 

The activities of Holy Cross outside the diocese of Fort 
Wayne can claim no space in a commemorative volume such 
as this; so nothing need be said of the Congregation's enter- 
prises in other portions of this country, or in Canada, India, 
or Rome. Apart from the educational and journaHstic work 
that is being accomplished at Notre Dame, its diocesan activ- 
ities are comprised in the school at Fort Wayne and in the 
pastoral charge of the eight churches in the city of South Bend. 
The historical sketches of these parishes appearing in another 
portion of this book obviate the necessity of dwelling upon 
them here. 

It would, however, be an unpardonable omission in any 
story, however brief, of Notre Dame and its builders to forego 
mention of the cordial relations that have always subsisted 
between the Congregation of Holy Cross and the great body 
of the secular clergy of Indiana; and it would be a still more 
unpardonable omission to neglect recording in this Golden 
Jubilee volume the Congregation's grateful appreciation of 
the manifold powers, the sympathetic encouragement, and the 
not infrequent cooperation for which its sincerest thanks have 
been due and rendered to the successive bishops of Fort Wayne, 
and not in least measure, to the present venerated incumbent 
of the see, the Right Reverend Mgr. Alerding. Deference to 
ecclesiastical superiors is a duty sedulously inculcated in the 
novitiates of Holy Cross, and harmonious action with episcopal 
authority its administrators have found to be a prerequisite 
condition for the blessing of God upon their words and works. 
It is a genuine pleasure to testify that nowhere in the sphere of 
the Congregation's activities has the duty been more easy, or 
the harmony more constant, than here in Northern Indiana. 

One word as to the present status of Holy Cross, and the 
promise of future development which that status seems to hold, 
will be a not inappropriate conclusion to this sketch of a 
Religious Congregation having its Mother-house within the 
diocese. In 1841 the Congregation numbered in the United 
States one priest and six Brothers; today the roll of ecclesiastics 
counts about one hundred and fifty, while the Brothers are 
nearly two hundred strong. The recent erection at Notre 



442 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Dame of Dujarie Institute, a house for young men aspiring to 
the Brotherhood, is an indication that under the adminis- 
tration of Very Reverend Provincial Morrissey, renewed efforts 
are to be made to foster vocations to the rehgious hfe, vocations 
which very certainly exist, and will assuredly fructify if only 
they be properly developed. The dismemberment of the Con- 
gregation in persecuted France is a calamity not without at 
least one compensating feature. The presence in any com- 
munity, or in any diocese, of a veritable man of God is a bene- 
diction of priceless worth, and not only Holy Cross but the 
whole diocese of Fort Wayne may well rejoice in one result of 
French anti-clericalism, the permanent residence henceforward 
at Notre Dame of the Superior General of the Congregation, 
Very Reverend Gilbert Francais, C. S. C. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF MEN, 
CONTINUED, 



THE CONGREGATION OF THE MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD (c. PP. S.) 

1854. 

The Congregation of the Most Precious Blood was founded 
in the beginning of the last century by Ven. Casper del Bufalo, 
a priest of Rome and a Canon at St. Peter's, for the purpose of 
spreading the devotion of the Most Precious Blood and of the 
giving of missions. Upon an invitation of the Most Rev. 
John B. Purcell, D. D., Archbishop of Cincinnati, through his 
Vicar General Henni, the saintly Rev. Francis Salesius Brunner 
with several companions: Revs. A. Meyer, M. J. Wittmer, 
M. Probst, J. Ringele, P. A. Capeder, J. Van den Broek and J. 
B. Jacomet, embarked for America and arrived in Cincinnati 
on January 1, 1844. The Archbishop assigned to them the 
church of St. Alphonse at Norwalk, Huron county, Ohio. 
From here they were to extend their administrations and 
missionary labors over the entire northwestern portion of the 
diocese of Cincinnati. The band of priests set out heroically 
for the wilderness and began their work, visiting the settlers 
dispersed through this region, and building churches where- 
ever they found a number of the faithful sufficient to form the 
nucleus of a parish. If the prospects for the growth of the 
Catholic population within a certain locality seemed favorable, 
a convent was also erected in connection with the church to 
serve as a home for the missionaries, and in some cases also 
for the Brothers and Sisters. 

Of the number of convents thus founded mention may be 
made of two: St. Charles Boromeo at Carthagena, Mercer 
county, Ohio, and St. Mary's Home near New Corydon, Jay 
county, Indiana. The former is the Mother-house and head- 



444 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

quarters of the American Province of the Congregation of the 
Most Precious Blood and the seat of the Seminary, and the 
latter is the first foundation within the limits of the present 
diocese of Fort Wayne. Founded in 1854 it was continued as 
a house for a small community of Sisters, who support them- 
selves by the labor of their hands. The chaplain, as well as the 
pastor of the Holy Trinity Parish Church and his assistant, 
reside near the convent. St. Mary's Church in Adams county 
is attended from here. For a number of years this remained 
the only charge of the Fathers of the Most Precious Blood in 
the Diocese of Fort Wayne. Several of the Fathers, however, 
notably Rev. Cosmas Seeberger, were engaged as missionaries 
and assistants to the pastors. 

In 1873 Bishop Dwenger, a member of the Congregation 
of the Most Precious Blood, asked them to assume charge of 
St. Peter's Church at Winamac. The parish of Indian Creek, 
begun at the same time, was afterwards incorporated into that 
of Pulaski. Both have continued since in charge of the Fathers 
C. PP. S. Mention must also be made of the labors of Rev. 
Dominic Shunk, C. PP. S., and others who had care of the 
scattered Catholics of a large portion of northwestern Indiana, 
building churches and chapels, and nursing the germs of Catho- 
licity in a very unpromising field. Some of the churches thus 
founded, such as North Judson, Wanatah and others, are now 
in charge of resident secular priests. 

In 1888 the Society took charge of the Indian School at 
Rensselaer, which had shortly before been erected by Miss 
(Mother) Catharine Drexel. Here many Indian children 
received the rudiments of an education, and a training in piety 
and character, until the withdrawal of the government support 
in 1896 made a continuance of the work impossible. The farm 
and buildings were then rented by the Fathers C. PP. S. from 
the Catholic Indian Bureau and later acquired by purchase. 
The building is now the home of two monthly Catholic publi- 
cations, The Messenger and The Botschafter. At the time the 
Indian School was confided to the Fathers, St. Augustine's 
parish at Rensselaer was also placed in their charge. 

A few years later the first steps were taken towards the 
foundation of a Catholic college to be conducted by the Fathers 
C. PP. S. As this is now a flourishing institution of learning 



Religious Communities, Continued. 445 

and the chief house of the Congregation in the diocese a more 
detailed account must be given of its origin and growth. Upon 
the place now occupied by the College, the diocese had main- 
tained an orphan asylum which was discontinued about 1884, 
the girls being removed to Fort Wayne and the boys to Lafay- 
ette. Bishop Dwenger, desirous of having a college for Cath- 
olic youth exclusively, invited the Fathers C. PP. S. to found 
a college here, offering them the land here for this purpose. 
The offer was accepted and a handsome building erected, 
which opened its doors in September 1891, under the name of 
St. Joseph's College. Its first rector was Rev. Augustine 
Seifert, C. PP. S., who was assisted by a faculty of five pro- 
fessors. The register of students for the first year shows 
fifty-four names. During the next few years the College 
grew rapidly, extending its course of instruction, perfecting 
its plan of teaching and general equipment, and more than 
doubling the number of students. In 1893 the main building 
was enlarged to twice its size and in 1897 a separate structure 
was erected for the use of the junior students and pupils of 
music. The grounds were also beautified, and various smaller 
buildings were added to supply the growing needs of the insti- 
tution. 

Having thus increased its capacity the College was enabled 
to add a Normal Department to those already existing, namely, 
the Collegiate, Commercial, and Preparatory. The Collegian, 
a monthly journal, published by the students, was launched 
in 1894, to stimulate the literary activities of the students. 

In 1896 the first class in the Collegiate department was 
graduated. Since then the growth of the College has been a 
steady one, advancing each year in material equipment as well 
as efficiency. Whatever defects were found to exist in the 
course were remedied, more attention was given to branches 
that are of practical importance and usefulness, the various 
courses were systematized and harmonized, and some of them 
were reorganized in accordance with modern methods and 
standards. In all these changes approved methods were not 
discarded, nor the course of instruction weakened by the intro- 
duction of useless matter at the expense of the more important 
branches. While the students are encouraged to improve 
their literary, dramatic and oratorical abilities under the super- 



446 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. 

vision of the professor, they are not permitted to do so to the 
detriment of their regular studies. Nor are athletic activities 
allowed to usurp the interests of the students and to interfere 
with their work in the study hall and class rooms. 

In 1904 a long felt want of the students was met by the 
erection of a new gymnasium, at a cost of $30,000, to serve 
them for various social and athletic purposes. All the meetings 
of the students are held in the large hall, as are also the enter- 
tainments and contests. The stage is provided with several 
sets of beautiful scenery. 

In 1906 the curricculum was once more extended by the 
introduction of a course in civil engineering. The College is 
at present attended by more than one hundred and seventy 
students, and has a faculty of sixteen, of whom two are lay-men. 

In 1898, in compliance with the wish of his predecessor, 
Bishop Dwenger, Bishop Rademacher established the Fathers 
C. PP. S. in the city of Fort Wayne. The Very Rev. 
Henry Drees, Provincial C. PP. S. sent the Rev. Francis 
Nigsch, C. PP. S., to organize the parish of the Most Precious 
Blood in the northwestern portion of the city by erecting a 
church and school and also a Mission House. The parish has 
enjoyed a steady growth and is in a flourishing condition. At 
present the Fathers have a chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital 
in Fort Wayne and at the Kneipp Sanitarium in Rome City. 
The Fathers C. PP. S., it can be said, have always endeavored 
to cooperate with the diocesan clergy in parochial, missionary 
and educational work. 



I 



CHAPTER XVIll, 



RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF WOMEN, 



THE SISTERS OF HOLY CROSS.* 

1843. 

The Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, founded 
at Le Mans, France, by the Very Reverend Basil Moreau, was 
still a young and comparatively unformed religious body, when 
the priests and Brothers of the Holy Cross, under the intrepid 
leadership of Father Sorin, left France for the New World. 
They came in answer to the call of Apostolic missionaries — ■ 
among them the saintly Brute, Bishop of Vincennes, and his 
successor, Bishop de la Hailandiere, — and, in November, 1842, 
we find the pioneer band of Holy Cross on the banks of the 
St. Joseph River, dedicating their new home to Mary Immacu- 
late, under the title Noire Dame du Lac. 

In June, 1843, the first Sisters of the Holy Cross arrived 
in this country, and, viewed in the light of future develop- 
ments, the names of these foundation religious, Sisters Mary 
of the Sacred Heart, Calvary, Bethlehem and Nazareth, seem 
to symbolize the two-fold nature of the life to which the sister- 
hood was called, that of Mary and that of Martha. The same 
year brought a second colony, and the little community at once 
took charge of the sacristy, infirmary, laundry, dairy and other 
domestic departments, forgetting in their devoted labors the 
cost of their sacrifice. 

With more than mere human foresight. Father Sorin saw 
the need of establishing the Sisters permanently and of opening 
a Novitiate. That the proposed Mother-House should be con- 
venient to Notre Dame, and, at the same time, sufficiently 
distant to insure favorable conditions of cloistral isolation, was 
understood and appreciated by Father Sorin and the Sisters, 



'''Conunumcatecl. 



448 The Diocese of Fort JVayne. 

and the extensive tract of land at the disposition of the Con- 
gregation offered more than one advantageous site. Bishop 
Hailandiere, however, fearing that the proximity of two 
religious communities of women — he himself had but lately 
brought the Sisters of Providence to Sainte Marie des Bois, — 
would prove detrimental to the growth of both institutes, 
refused permission to establish a novitiate and mother-house 
in his diocese, that of Vincennes. 

Father Sorin then addressed himself to Bishop Lefevre, of 
Detroit, who consented to a foundation at Bertrand, Michigan, 
about eight miles from Notre Dame. This permission was 
almost immediately withdrawn, at the instance of Bishop 
Hailandiere; but, through the mediation of Bishop Purcell, 
later Archbishop of Cincinnati, objections were over-ruled, the 
prohibition -was removed, and the Mother-House of the Con- 
gregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross in America was 
opened, at Bertrand, in July, 1844. In September of the same 
year, the first investiture in the habit of the Order took place, 
marking the beginning of growth in the humble community. 

From 1844 to 1855, the Congregation shaped itself along 
the various lines of work which Divine Providence seemed to 
point out, and the close of the first decade of activity found 
the Sisters not only carrying out the primal object of their 
coming to the New World, — that is, the conduct of domestic 
affairs for the priests and Brothers at Notre Dame, — but also 
charged with the care of a home for orphans and deaf mutes, 
an Industrial School and an Academy at Bertrand, and a 
school for Indians at Pokagon. This summary of achievement 
includes much unwritten history, unwritten but not unrecorded 
in the annals of eternity. The period, though one blessed 
with a measure of success, was wanting in the sense of stability 
which cannot be enjoyed by the children of the Church when 
full episcopal approbation is withheld. There was no censure 
on the Community, but the atmosphere had not the clearness 
of perfect understanding, and this took from the value of 
material successes which came as answer to labor and prayer. 

In 1855, with the permission of Bishop de St. Palais, of 
the diocese of Vincennes, the Mother-House of the Sisterhood, 
including the Academy and other interests connected with it, 
was transferred from Bertrand to its present site, a mile and a 



Religious Communities, Continued. 449 

quarter from Notre Dame, on a beautiful plateau overlooking 
the St. Joseph River, not far frorn the historic spot known as 
"the portage." The first buildings at St. Mary's were frame 
structures brought from Bertrand and Mishawaka, where the 
.Sisters had opened a mission, and it is in connection with this 
transfer of the Community's headquarters that the name of 
Mother M. Angela, (Eliza Gillespie) begins to stand out prom- 
inently in the record of the growth and well-being of the Con- 
gregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. A woman of rare 
powers of mind and heart, she was an inspiration to those she 
so long served as superior and guided as friend and counsellor. 
For thirty-four years, Mother Angela spent herself in the service 
of the Congregation, and her influence is felt today in all that 
is best in the varied branches of the educational and hospital 
work carried on by the Sisters.* 

A new era opened with the founding of St. Mary's,and 
yet, when one looks back at the work accomplished in Bertrand, 
one realizes that in those early years the seeds of the later 
achievements were sown and nurtured. The Community in 
that formative period was stamped with the characteristics 
held to be its distinguishing marks today, — a spirit of progress, 
common-sense, zeal, devotedness and self-sacrifice. As early 
as 1852, an Association of Children of Mary was formed, and 
affiliated by Father Sorin with the Sodalities of Paris and 
Rome. In 1854, the Sisters were enrolled as members of the 
Association of Perpetual Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. 
Thus we see that at the altar of God and the shrine of Our 
Lady, help and strength and courage were sought and found. 

The Diocese of Fort Wayne was erected as a separate See 
in 1857, and in the first incumbent, Bishop Luers, the Congre- 
gation had a sympathetic and staunch adviser and friend. 
1855 to 1865 were crucial years, but years blessed by God. 
TheyVitnessed a remarkable development as regards numbers 
and establishments. With the enlarged sphere of activity, 
came also burdens of responsibility, and as the organization 
became more defined in its work and methods, difficulties 
naturally arose, some because of relations with France, others 



*This brief sketch does not permit the mention of other names also recorded in the memory 
of the Congregation as noble, heroic religious, who at different limes were charged with the adminis- 
tration of affairs. For further notice of these, the reader is referred to A Story ot Htty Years, 
issued by the Sisters of the Holy Cross, in 1905, in commemoraUon of St. Mary s Golden Jubilee. 



450 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

from conditions incident upon extension of interests. Through 
all the trials, the spirit of faith sustained the Sisters, and God's 
power was recognized in dark hours as in bright. 

In 1861, there were one hundred and sixty-five religious 
of the Holy Cross owing allegiance to St. Mary's, the Sisters on 
the various missions founded from the Mother-House included, 
and when war's desolation began to be felt, about one-half of 
that number responded to the call of obedience and went to the 
care of the sick and wounded. Their services had been solicited 
by Governor Morton, at the instance of General Lew Wallace, 
and Father Sorin knew the spirit of the Community when he 
asked for volunteers. The services of the Sisters were given in 
the military hospitals at Washington, Memphis, Paducah, 
Louisville, Cairo and Mound City, and on the hospital boats 
that bore the suffering soldiers from the scenes of strife to 
where they might receive medical attention and the care they 
needed. Of the four-score Holy Cross Sister-nurses of the 
Civil War, only twenty-two answer the roll-call today. The 
others have found eternal peace; and each year, on Memorial 
Day, when the students of St. Mary's place a laurel-wreath and 
flag on each of the graves, the living learn anew from the dead 
the lesson of love of country and love of God. 

Meanwhile the work of building up the Congregation went 
on at home and on the missions, which were yearly increasing, 
thus spreading the Community and multiplying ways and means 
of doing good. Through all the varied works of the Sisters, 
Father Sorin was director, guide, father and friend; and when 
there was threatened misunderstanding of his attitude towards 
the Community, on the part of authorities in France and Rome, 
he was ready to sacrifice his personal hopes in regard to the 
Congregation, which he virtually founded, rather than in any 
way militate against its well-being. This interested and dis- 
interested zeal for the Sisters characterized Father Sorin's 
spirit up to his latest years, and when he died in 1893, his last 
whispered prayers mingled with those of his devoted children 
of the Cross who were with him when the final summons came. 

The severance of relations with France and the recognition 
at Rome of the Sisters of the Holy Cross as a distinct Order, 
with St. Mary's as the Mother-House, marked 1869 as a year 
of renewed courage, and the twenty years that followed were 



Religious Communities, Continued. 451 

crowned in 1889 with the ApostoHc Approbation of the New 
Constitution of the Congregation, which superseded that framed 
by France in the early formative years. This temporary appro- 
bation of Rome, announced to the Sisters by Bishop Dwenger, 
was finally confirmed in 1896 ,when the Congregation took its 
place as an approved Order of the Church. 

The object of the Congregation is the sanctification of its 
members and the salvation of souls. To this end it is devoted 
to education, — conducting schools, parochial and academic, — 
and to works of charity, — caring for the sick and for orphans. 
Though founded in France, the Community is American in 
spirit, having no distinction in dress or rank of choir and lay 
religious. Its members, one thousand in number, represent 
many nationalities, but all are unified under the banner of the 
Cross. 

St. Mary's is truly the "Mother-House," with all that the 
name implies, to the establishments under the care of the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. It is the nursery of the order, the 
training school of the teaching body, the home of the Sisters. 
To give an idea of the growth of the Community in little more 
than half a century, we quote the following extract from the 
Jubilee book, published two years ago: 

"The most convenient summary of the missions conducted 
by the Sisters of the Holy Cross will, perhaps, be according to 
location, rather than date of foundation, and those nearest 
home are the establishments in the State of Indiana. First of 
these, even antedating the present Mother-House, is the home 
of the Sisters employed at Notre Dame. At that great centre 
of varied activities, the Sisters of the Holy Cross have the care 
of the sick, are charged with the domestic work, are engaged 
in some of the branches of the publishing department, and 
teach in St. Edward's Hall. St. Joseph's Academy, South 
Bend, is also one of the old foundations, and seems almost like 
a part of the Mother-House; it is the centre from which are 
supplied the teachers of the parochial schools attached to St. 
Patrick's, St. Mary's and St. Hedwig's congregations. On the 
east side of the city are Assumption School, the parish school 
of St. Joseph's church, and St. Joseph's Hospital, a splendidly 
equipped new building, on a height overlooking the St. Joseph 
River and valley. Near Fort Wayne is a mission that is 



452 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

endeared by many associations, for it claimed the special and 
personal interest of Father Sorin, — the Academy of the Sacred 
Heart,— which dates back to 1866. Like St. Mary's, it has the 
charm of solitude, and in its beautiful environment traditions 
find a favorable atmosphere. St. Rose's, Laporte; Holy Angel's 
and St. Vincent's, Logansport; St. Charles', Crawfordsville; 
St. Michael's, Plymouth; St. Vincent's, Elkhart; St. John's, 
Goshen; St. Mary's, Union City; St. Paul's, Valparaiso; and 
St. Mary's, Anderson, are the other schools in the diocese of 
Fort Wayne, at present under the direction of the Sisters of 
the Holy Cross. 

"St. John's Hospital, Anderson, founded through the 
munificence of Mr. and Mrs. John Hickey, represents an im- 
portant phase of the Congregation's active life, in a constantly 
growing field of Christian charity. 

"At Morris, Illinois, the Congregation conducts St. Angela's 
Academy and the parochial school attached to the Church of 
the Immaculate Conception. St. Angela's was founded in 1857, 
and has won an enviable name in the world of Catholic educa- 
tion. * * * St. Patrick's, Chatsworth; St. Mary's Academy, 
Danville; St. Mary's School, Westville; St. John's School, 
Peoria; St. Mary's Infirmary, Cairo; and Our Saviour's 
Hospital, Jacksonville, are also in the archdiocese of Chicago. 
Ohio has one house of the Order, Mt. Carmel Hospital at Col- 
umbus, an institution which embodies, as some one well ex- 
pressed it, all that science and heart can give to a home for the 
sick. Attached to it is a well organized training school for 
nurses. 

"The Eastern houses are near enough together to give 
the community the strength of union in that province, and at 
least two of the foundations claim nearly as many years as 
does the Mother-House itself. St. Patrick's School, Baltimore, 
was opened in 1859, and St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, Wash- 
mgton, D. C, was founded in 1856. The latter institution has 
come to be a landmark in the Capital, and its wise adminis- 
tration has won for it encomiums from men of prominence 
and national fame. St. Cecilia's Academy has seen much of 
the changing panorama of Washington life, and viewing it 
from the heights she has gone on quietly, unaffected by time's 
vicissitudes. The Sisters who teach St. Peter's School make 



Religious Communities, Continued. 453 

St. Cecelia's their home. Holy Cro*ss Academy is in the west 
end of the city, on Massachusetts Avenue, and numbers among 
its friends and alumnse many people of prominence in the 
District. From Holy Cross are taught St. Matthews' and St. 
Paul's Schools. The Reverend Dr. Stafford's new school, St. 
Patrick's Academy, is also in charge of the Sisters of the Holy 
Cross. 

"St. Mary's Academy, Alexandria, goes back to 1869 for 
its beginning, but can point to its fme newly-appointed Colonial 
mansion should anyone refer to an old-time atmosphere about 
the historic Virginia town. In Baltimore, the Sisters direct 
St. Patrick's School, St. Patrick's Orphan Asylum, and the 
Dolan Aid Asylum, on South Broadway, while in St. Pius' 
parish, they conduct the parochial school and St. Catharine's 
Normal Institute, founded under the auspices of Archbishop 
Bailey. 

"The community is represented at Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, by three schools. Sacred Heart Academy, Sacred 
Heart School and St. Anthony's School. Farthest east is St. 
Paul's School, connected with the Paulist Church in New York. 
The southern province claims two foundations, — both in Texas, 
— St. Mary's, Austin, one of the community's most important 
houses, and St. Mary's, Marshall. On our way west, we may 
mention St. Mary's School, Davenport, Iowa. In Utah are 
some of the community's most ambitious foundations,- — St. 
Mary's Academy and Holy Cross Hospital, splendidly equipped 
institutions and each doing exceptionally fme work in its line. 
The Sisters also care for the children at St. Ann's, an orphan 
asylum which is a monument to the zeal and charity of Bishop 
Scanlan. Ogden has one of the finest buildings in the State 
in Sacred Heart Academy, which holds a place second to none 
among the schools of the west. St. Patrick's School, Ogden; 
St. Mary's, Park City and St. Joseph's, Eureka, complete the 
Utah list. In Idaho, the Sisters of the Holy Cross are to be 
found at St. Teresa Academy and St. Alphonsus' Hospital, 
Boise City, and at St. Joseph's School, Pocatello. In California, 
the Sisters at St. Augustine's, Fresno; St. Charles', San Fran- 
cisco, and Holy Rosary, Woodland, call St. Mary's "home"; 
and sunlit and fair as is their western abiding place, in days of 



454 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

trial as in days of jubilee, their hearts turn to the 'old home 
ground.' " 

St. Mary's, besides being the Mother-House of the Sisters 
of the Holy Cross, is a most important Catholic educational 
institution for young women in the west. It stands for the 
highest and best in Catholic education. It is almost a little 
town in itself, for its buildings include the chapel, — really a 
church in size and dignity of architecture, — a smaller chapel, 
a fac-simile of the Holy House of Loretto, and enriched with the 
indulgences granted to the Santa Casa, the presbytery, where 
the two resident chaplains dwell, the Sisters' Infirmary, the 
student's Infirmary, the Novitiate, Convent, Academy, College, 
Conservatory of Music and Gymnasium. The equipment of 
the school buildings is thoroughly up-to-date, and that the 
Academic certificate is recognized by the Universities of 
Chicago and Michigan is evidence of the excellence of the St. 
Mary's work from a pedagogic point of view. The institution, 
both as a school and as a religious centre, is in close relation 
with the Bishop of Fort Wayne, who presides over the formal 
functions of the Congregation, — Commencement Exercises, 
Receptions, Professions and the Election of Superiors. 

The excellence of the work of the Community is recognized 
and appreciated wherever the Sisters are, but there is a lack of 
subjects to meet the demands of the times. This brief sketch 
would have included many more missions in the list of establish- 
ments of the Order had there been Sisters to take charge of the 
work waiting. Ten openings refused for want of helpers to 
carry on God's work, — such is the record for the first six months 
of 1907! "The harvest indeed is great, but the laborers are 
few. Pray ye, therefore, the Lord of the harvest, that He 
send forth laborers into His harvest." 



The following notes, from the Annals of the Congregation 
of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, supply references necessarily 
omitted from the foregoing outline-sketch of the Community's 
history: 

1843, Father Moreau sent from France to Notre Dame the 
large bell, now in St. Mary's belfry. 

1845, The same Father sent a statue of Our Lady of Consola- 
tion now at St. Mary's. 



Religious Communities, Continued. 455 

1854, The Rush property, the present site of St. Mary's, was 
purchased. 

1855, April 24th, Father Sorin blessed the corner-stone of the 
new St. Mary's. In August, the Convent and Academy 
were moved from Bertrand, also the Novitiate from 
Notre Dame. St. Mary's was incorporated under the 
laws of Indiana. 

1859, Loretto Chapel, a fac-simile of the Holy House in Italy, 
was built. 

1866, On St. Mary's Campus are two cannon which Commodore 
Davis presented as souvenirs of the Civil War. These 
cannon. Lady Polk and Lady Davis, were captured from 
the Confederates at Island No. 10. 

1870, The first Council of Administration under the new Con- 
stitution was elected; Bishop Luers presided. 

1875, The Papal Envoys, Roncetti and Ubaldi visited St. 
Mary's. 

1876, Council of Administration was elected. Bishop Dwenger 
presiding; and again in 1882; and a third time in 1889. 

1892, St. Mary's Chimes published for the first time. 

1893, Monsignore SatolU visited St. Mary's. 

1895, Council of Administration was elected; Bishop Rade- 
macher presiding. 

1896, Final Approbation of Constitution announced by Bishop 
Rademacher. 

1897, Sisters sent as nurses in Spanish War. 

1899, Archbishop Martinelli, Apostolic Delegate, visited St. 
Mary's. 

1901, Council of Administration elected; Bishop Alerding pre- 
siding. Mother Perpetua, Superior General, Mothers 
Aquina, Pauline, Sabina and Bethlehem, assistants. 

1902, Archbishop Falconio, Apostolic Delegate, visited St. 
Mary's. 

1904, His Eminence, Cardinal SatolU, visited St. Mary's. 

1905, June 15th, and August 15th, Golden Jubilee celebrations. 
Plenary Indulgence obtained for Sisters and pupils on 
both days, by Bishop Alerding. 

1907, Council of Administration was elected; Bishop Alerding 
presiding. 



CHAPTER XIX. 



RELIGIOUS COA1MUNITIES OF WOMEN, 
CONTINUED. 



THE POOR HANDMAIDS OF JESUS CHRIST. 
1863. 

The community of the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ 
was founded by Miss Catharine Kasper, a native of Dernbach, 
Germany. She was born May 26, 1820, of humble parents and 
throughout her childhood displayed the virtues which charac- 
terized and ennobled her later life. Humility, charity, com- 
passion for the poor and love of poverty permeated and filled 
her heart with a great desire of consecrating herself to God. 
She was animated with the piety of Mary and the activity of 
Martha and therefore wished to combine the contemplative and 
active life in the service of her Master. She and two other 
young ladies took their vows and professed themselves Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ, on August 15, 1851. Sister Mary 
(Catharine Kasper) was chosen Mother General of the newly 
founded community and continued as such until her death, 
February 2, 1898. 

Though poverty reigned in the humble dwelling, which 
formed the home of the first Poor Handmaids, they proceeded 
at once to carry out their plans of aiding the poor sick. Mother 
Mary's filial confidence in the All-providing Hand of our Father 
never wavered, but confidently awaited the development of his 
plans. "Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it done unto 
me according to Thy word," was her motto and so trusting in 
God she planted the mustard seed, which sprouted and grew to 
be a tree whose branches reach far and wide throughout Ger- 
many, Austria, England, Holland and North America. 

Mother Mary Kasper at first had no intention of engaging 
in the education and training of the young; she thought that 
far too high a calling for her community, which she intended 



Religious Communities, Continued. 457 

should be consecrated simply to the care of the sick and poor 
and especially of the orphans. But God had other designs and 
intended that the infant community should also share in the 
blessed work of Christian education. The 'humble servant of 
God recognized this in the various circumstances, which made 
it seem expedient to add a teaching body to her young order. 
Accordingly a normal school for the education of the Sisters, 
who were to become teachers, was established. They soon 
entered upon this work and until the breaking out of the 
Kultur-kampf conducted, in their native country, parochial 
schools, academies, boarding schools, kinder-gartens and 
industrial schools. During these troubled times they were 
deprived of the parochial schools, but continued in charge 
of the other educational institutions and of the hospitals, 
sanitariums, infirmaries and private nursing. At present the 
community numbers about three thousand Sisters. The rules 
for their government were approved by Pope Pius IX in 1870, 
and were confirmed by Pope Leo XIII in 1890. 

Through the efforts of Bishop Luers and Rev. Edward 
Koenig, pastor of St. Paul's Church at Fort Wayne, the com- 
munity entered upon their labors in the diocese of Fort Wayne, 
on August 3, 1863. The first little band of Sisters, who came 
to the New World, were eight in number: Sisters Mary Rosa, 
Eudo.xia, Hyacintha, Facunda, Matrona, Henricka, Bella and 
Remigia. Sister M. Rosa was the first superioress. She 
returned to Germany in 1872. Of the other seven four are 
dead, while Sister Hyacintha is still pursuing her holy vocation 
in Fort Wayne, Sister Henricka in Centralia and Sister Bella 
in Chicago. The place of their first residence in the diocese 
was Hesse Cassel, eight miles from Fort Wayne, from which 
place three sisters were called to Chicago in 1869 by the Very 
Rev. Peter Fischer, V. G., to take charge of the German orphan 
asylum. That asylum began with twelve children, but now 
shelters more than six hundred orphans. 

The community established itself in Fort Wayne on May 
9, 1869, in the building known as the Rockhill Place. The 
present convent and chapel were erected in 1883 at a cost of 
132,000. This convent is the provincial Mother-House for all 
the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ in America. Since its 
estabHshment the convent has now its third chaplain, the Rev. 



458 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Thomas Eisenring, C. PP. S. The other two were Rev. Theo- 
dore Hibbelen till February 2, 1886 and Rev. Julius Becks till 
December 3, 1889. The first young lady, who entered the 
community of the Poor Handmaids in America, was Miss 
Catharine Baker (Sister M. Joseph) on February 2, 1871. 

The first parochial school, conducted by the Poor Hand- 
maids in this country, was that of St. Paul's Parish at Fort 
Wayne, of which they took charge on October 5, 1896. They 
also had charge of the school at Avilla, where they were engaged 
likewise in the nursing of the sick and of the school at Hesse 
Cassel, from which schools however they were withdrawn in 1877. 
Since October 25, 1878 they have conducted the parochial 
school of St. Joseph's Parish at Mishawaka, where they are 
engaged also in private nursing. The St. Vincent's Orphan 
Asylum at Fort Wayne has been entrusted to their care since 
September 19, 1887. They have been engaged in the work of 
teaching and private nursing in Areola since December 19, 
1895. A convent of theirs was established at South Bend on 
September 8, 1899, where they act as private nurses, caring for 
the sick in their homes. St. Roch's Sanitarium for consump- 
tives was opened December 3, 1899. Their Holy Family 
Hospital at Laporte has existed since March 1, 1900. 

The labors of the Poor Handmaids in the diocese of Belle- 
ville are extensive. They are engaged in teaching and private 
nursing in that diocese at Carlyle, Germantown, Trenton, St. 
Libory, Mascoutah, Fayetteville, Millstadt, Centralia, Wendelin, 
Columbia, Hecker, Beckemeyer. In the diocese of Belleville 
they also conduct St. Mary's Hospital in East St. Louis, St. 
Vincent's Hospital in Belleville, St. Joseph's Hospital in Breese, 
and the Sacred Heart Hospital in Aviston. St. John's Orphan 
Asylum at Belleville is also entrusted to their care. 

in the diocese of Alton the Poor Handmaids have charge 
of St. John's school and St. Vincent's Home, both in Quincy, 
and of St. Boniface's School in Edwardsville. In the diocese 
of Superior they conduct St. Joseph's Hospital at Ashland, 
St. Francis' Hospital at Superior City and St. Mary's Hospital 
at West Superior. In the Archdiocese of St. Paul they have 
charge of the St. Alexander Hospital at New Ulm. In the 
Archdiocese of Chicago they conduct the St. Ann's Sanitarium 
and the St. Elizabeth's Hospital and Isolation Hospital. From 



Religions Communities, Continued. 459 

their convents at 52 Newberry aveTiue and 212 Hudson avenue 
they go as private nurses to care for the sick in their homes. 
In connection with the latter convent is a Kinder-garten in 
charge of the Sisters. In the same Archdiocese of Chicago 
they teach St. Augustine's and St. Henry's schools and have 
charge of the Guardian Angel Orphanage in the city of Chicago 
and of the Sacred Heart school at Melrose Park. 

The provincial heads of the community in America were 
successively: Mother M. Rosa till 1872 when she returned to 
Germany and was succeeded by Mother M. Prudentia who 
gave place to Mother M. Secunda in 1885 and was in turn 
succeeded by Mother M. Hyacintha till 1904, when Mother M. 
Secunda, the present provincial superioress, was again placed 
at the head of the community. The Poor Handmaids in 
America number four hundred and nine professed sisters, 
forty-five novices and thirty postulants. 



CHAPTER XX. 

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF WOMEN, 
CONTINUED. 



THE SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS OF PERPETUAL ADORATION. 

• 1875. 

The community of the Sisters of St. Francis of the Per- 
petual Adoration was founded with the approval of the Right 
Rev. Conrad Martin, Bishop of Paderborn, Westphalia, Prussia, 
on December 20, 1860, in the town of Olpe, by Mary Teresa 
Bonzel. Its constitutions were approved by the Holy See on 
April 13, 1897. Its objects are: The sanctification of its 
members, perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, 
nursing of the sick and the education especially of poor and 
neglected children. In Germany the congregation numbers 
about one thousand Sisters in eighty establishments. 

Towards the end of the year of 1875, at the invitation of 
Bishop Dwenger, six Sisters of this community came to the 
United States. They arrived on December 12th and two days 
later reached their destination, Lafayette, Indiana. Unknown 
and without means they entered upon their work of charity. 
A small house was placed at their disposal, which they occupied 
until October, 1876. A benefactor, Albert Wagner, donated 
two lots to them, and on these the first buildings of the present 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital were erected. The corner-stone was 
laid on Trinity Sunday, June 11, 1876 and the dedication took 
place on November 19th, following. In 1879 the east wing, 
and in 1883 the west wing and the chapel were built. With 
the growth and prosperity of Lafayette grew also the demands 
on the Sisters' charity, so that in the course of time the erection 
of a new hospital became necessary. It was built in 1896, and 
the formal opening took place on January 6, 1897, after a 
pontifical high mass celebrated by Bishop Rademacher. 
This hospital, at that time, was deemed of sufficient size to 
meet all requirements of the Sisterhood for many years, but 



Religious Communities, Continued. 461 

the institution grew so rapidly, that the building proved in- 
adequate to meet the demands of charity, and in 1904 a large 
addition was decided upon, one wing to serve as the St. Francis' 
Convent for the Sisters, and another to contain a spacious 
chapel and to complete the original plan of St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital. 

The last addition is a substantial three-story structure of 
brick and stone, with basement and attic. The basement 
contains kitchen, dining rooms, and rooms for domestic pur- 
poses. On the first floor are the offices, parlors, private rooms 
and dispensary. On the second and third floors are dormitories 
and private rooms; also, community rooms. The attic con- 
tains dormitories and storage rooms. All the floors are reached 
by elevator. Pressed brick, sand-stone and terra-cotta trim- 
mings are notable features of the building's exterior. 

The new chapel is of Gothic design, 128x50 feet. Pillars 
divide it into three aisles, the middle one 46 feet 6 inches, the 
side aisles 29 feet high. From the capitols of the pillars rise 
the groined arches of the ceiling, which, like the walls, is dec- 
orated in chaste colors, showing various religious emblems and 
designs. The sanctuary is notable for the harmonious blending 
of the colors of the decorations with the artistic memorial 
windows encircling the main altar. Of these windows there 
are seven in the sanctuary, and two in one and four in the 
other transept; two are in front of the chapel and eight in the 
side walls. The main features, however, are the three altars 
and the communion rail, all exquisitely carved in pure white 
marble. The sanctuary, the aisles and the sacristy floors are 
inlaid with mosaic tiling of artistic design. The dedication of 
the new chapel and the consecration of the three marble altars 
was solemnly performed by Bishop Alerding, assisted by a 
great number of priests, on December 31, 1905. 

The first superioress of the six sisters who came to Lafay- 
ette in 1875 was Sister Clara. After her death in 1878, Sister 
Deo Gratias was appointed to the office. In 1884 she was 
recalled to Germany and Sister Hyacintha became her suc- 
cessor. In 1886 she also returned to Europe, and was suc- 
ceeded by Sister Alphonsa, who was, at the same time, appointed 
Superioress Provincial of all the establishments of the com- 
munity in the United States. Sister Alphonsa remained at 



462 The Diocese of Fort IVayne. I 

the head of the community until May 18, 1900, when she was 
called to her eternal reward. The best tribute that can be 
paid to her memory is that given by the splendid development 
and achievements of the Order under her leadership. The 
office made vacant by her death was filled on June 21st by the 
appointment, as Superioress Provincial, of Sister Josepha who 
is still at the head of the community. 

Only a small part of the magnificent work done by the 
Sisters of St. Francis of the Lafayette community is manifested 
in their local establishment. Besides those in the diocese of 
Fort Wayne, the Sisterhood established and conducts branch 
houses in the dioceses of Omaha, Denver, Kansas, Indianapolis, 
Cleveland, Nashville, Lincoln, St. Joseph, St. Louis, Chicago 
and Louisville. They have the following hospitals in Indiana: 
St. Elizabeth's at Lafayette, St. Margaret's at Hammond, 
St. Joseph's at Logansport, St. Edward's at New Albany, St. 
Anthony's at Terre Haute and St. .Anthony's at Michigan City. 
In Illinois: St. Francis' at Evanston. In Ohio: St. Alexius' 
and St. John's at Cleveland. In Tennessee: St. Joseph's at 
Memphis. In Kentucky: St. Anthony's at Louisville. In 
Colorado: St. Anthony's at Denver, St. Francis' at Longmont, 
and St. Francis' at Colorado Springs. In Nebraska: St. 
Joseph's at Omaha, St. Mary's at Columbus, St. Francis' at 
Grand Island, St. Elizabeth's at Lincoln. In Kansas: St. 
Mary's at Emporia. 

The Sisters of St. Francis have charge of the following 
schools. In Indiana: In St. Boniface's and St. Lawrence's 
at Lafayette, in Sacred Heart at Fowler, in St. Joseph's at 
Kentland, in St. Mary's at Dunnington, in Sacred Heart at 
Remington, in St. John's at St. John, in St. Martin's at Hanover, 
Centre, in St. Casimir's at North Hammond, and in St. Bridget's 
at Logansport. In Tennessee: In St. Mary's at Memphis. 
In Kansas: In Sacred Heart at Emporia, and in St. Joseph's 
at Olpe. In Missouri: In Immaculate Conception at Union, 
in St. Mary's at Wien, in St. George's at Hermann, in St. Ann's 
at Clover Bottom. In Nebraska: In Immaculate Conception 
at Omaha, in St. Francis' at South Omaha, in St. Francis' at 
Columbus, in St. Francis' at Lincoln, in St. Bernard's at St. 
Bernard, in St. Mary's at St. Mary, in St. Anthony's at St. 
Anthony, in St. Francis' at Humphrey, in St. Joseph's at Platte 



Religious Communities, Continued. 463 

Centre, in St. Stanislaus' at Duncan, in St. Michael's at Tarnov, 
in St. Boniface's at Monterey, and in SS. Peter and Paul's at 
Krakow. In New Mexico: In Our Lady of Guadalupe's at 
Pena Blanca and in Our Lady of Gaudalupe's at James. They 
conduct a high school in St. Mary's Parish at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, and an Academy in St. Francis' Parish at Columbus, 
Nebraska. 

In 1893 the Sisters accepted the charge and management 
of the St. Joseph's Diocesan Orphan Asylum at Lafayette. 
The number of Sisters there is twelve. In 1897 the Sisters of 
St. Francis opened the St. Anthony's Home for the Aged in 
Lafayette. 

The total number of the members of the Lafayette com- 
munity of the Sisters of St. Francis in the United States is: 
five hundred and thirty-five professed Sisters, ninety novices, 
nineteen postulants. The general mother-house of the Sisters 
of St. Francis of Perpetual Adoration is at Olpe, Westphalia, 
Germany. The Provincial Mother-house and Novitiate for 
America is St. Francis Convent at Lafayette, Indiana. 



CHAPTER XXI. • 

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF WOMEN, 
CONTINUED. 



THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH. 

1888. 

The celebrated missionary, Rev. John Medaille, S. J., of 
Le Puy, was the founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of 
St. Joseph, in the year 1650. The purposes for which it was 
established were: First, that the members of it labor earnestly 
for their own sanctification, aspiring to the most sublime 
degree of Christian perfection; second, that they assist their 
neighbor, as far as possible, by every work of mercy, both 
spiritual and corporal. 

The Sisters came to America in 1836, under the auspices 
of Bishop Rosati, locating at St. Louis, Since that year they 
have been introduced into many of the dioceses of the United 
States. In the year 1888 three Sisters of St. Joseph moved by 
the apostolic spirit, left their convent at Watertown, New 
York. They journeyed to Cape Vincent, and at this point 
crossed the St. Lawrence river to Kingston, Canada. It was a 
hazardous trip, for the spring thaw had begun and the ice was 
beginning to break. It was not without difficulty that a stage 
driver was secured to take them across the river. Before 
mounting the box the driver informed his patrons, that he 
must drive rapidly, to lessen the risk of breaking through. As 
they sped along the ice rose and fell, under the flying hoofs of 
the horses, and it was with a sense of relief and many a fervent 
thanksgiving to God, that the now thoroughly frightened 
Sisters left the vehicle. From Kingston they continued their 
journey by rail. Passing through Canada they encountered 
severe snow-storms, and they were almost frozen waiting to 
make connections at three different points. Many other 
obstacles hindered their progress. But, divine Providence over 
them, they reached their destination, Tipton, on the afternoon 
of March 15th, after three days of travel. 

Tipton, at that time, was a small county seat depending 
almost entirely upon the farmers for its life and traffic. There 



Religious Communities, Continued. 465 

were few Catholic families in the vicinity and the church was 
a small brick building, of which Rev. F. G. Lentz was the 
resident pastor. This priest with the approval of Bishop 
Dwenger, had induced the Sisters to come, and he now met 
them at the station with every demonstration of joy. All the 
members of the parish, old and young, vied with each other to 
bid the Sisters welcome and to supply their needs. For two 
weeks the Sisters partook of the hospitality of a kind lady, 
until their little cottage, on North Oak street, was ready to 
receive them. Only one room of this cottage was plastered; 
being used as a parlor during the day, then when calling hours 
were over, beds were brought in and removed in the morning, 
that breakfast might be served. These were times of trials, 
but the Sisters never lost courage. Total strangers to the 
people they soon became acquainted, and visions of the good 
that was to be accompHshed in this new and wild country rose 
up to cheer them. 

The parochial school composed of a few children, but 
recently organized, had been taught by a secular teacher. 
Two rooms were now formed and the classes established by 
September of the year of their arrival. The first years of the 
Sisters' Hfe in Tipton were filled with labor and anxiety. Their 
numbers were few, and they were unable to cope with the work 
which they found awaiting them. Sometimes it required more 
than ordinary religious fervor and courage to sustain the thought, 
that anything was being accomplished; unless it be the com- 
plete self-abnegation of the Sisters teaching school, making 
linens for the altar, training the choir, visiting the sick and the 
dying, and at eventide repairing to their little home, and with 
voices that never faltered, giving thanks to God for the rough, 
yet blessed path, they had chosen as their own. At one time 
the star of the little community it seemed was about to set, 
when Reverend Mother Gertrude was stricken with fever; but 
after weeks of anguish and suspense, of watching and praying, 
she was restored to her former health. Then too, five mounds 
in the Catholic cemetery marked the place, where rest the 
mortal remains of five devoted souls. 

Providence, ever kind and propitious, inspired the wealthy 
father of Mother Gertrude to provide the means necessary for 
the erection of a suitable convent for the Sisters. This structure 



466 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

was erected in 1891, when the Httle cottage on Oak street was 
abandoned, and the Sisters moved into their new and com- 
modious St. Joseph's Convent. The first graduation class of 
the high school received their diplomas in 1892; and this was 
repeated each year until at the present time, the Sisters point 
with pride to the numerous membership of the St. Joseph's 
Alumnae Association. 

In 1893 , Bishop Rademacher appointed Rev. Anthony J. 
Kroeger the Spiritual Director of the Sisters. It was at his 
suggestion that the valuable two hundred acre farm, located 
about one mile from Tipton, was purchased. The treasury of 
the community being empty, Father Kroeger himself furnished 
the required purchase money. On account of the rapid growth 
of the institution, the demand for more room and better ac- 
commodations became urgent. A splendid structure was 
erected, in 1903, to supply the demand. The new building 
stands on the two hundred acre farm, over-looking a scene 
of rural beauty and peace. The pure country air and the 
delights of the rustic scenery contribute to make it an ideal 
home for the student. Here are seen beautiful drive-ways, 
cement walks, artistic flower-beds, numerous shade trees, and 
a large campus on which the young ladies indulge in out-door 
games, and especially the fine, new gymnasium. The building, 
which is the Mother-house of the Sisters of St. Joseph and St. 
Joseph's Academy for young ladies, has a frontage of over 150 
feet and a depth of 53 feet, and including the basement is five 
stories high. The basement, constructed of granite bowlders 
skillfully cut and laid, is occupied by steam boilers, the kitchen, 
the laundry department, two refectories and store rooms. 
On the first floor are the parlors, the chaplain's apartments, 
the chapel, reception rooms and the private offices of the 
Mother Superior and the Secretary. The class rooms, music 
rooms, library, commercial hall, a large assembly room, and 
sewing rooms occupy the second floor. The rest of the building 
is devoted to private rooms and sleeping apartments. The 
building can accommodate about one hundred students. 

St. Joseph's Academy, the parish schools at Tipton, 
Delphi, Elwood, Kokomo and St. Bridget's in Logansport are 
conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph, and are all in a flourishing 
condition. 



CHAPTER XXII, 



RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF WOMEN, 
CONTINUED. 

THE SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE. 2. THE SISTERS OF THE 
MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD. 3. THE SCHOOL SISTERS OF NOTRE 
DAME. 4. THE SISTERS OF ST. AGNES. 5. THE FRAN- 
CISCAN SISTERS OF THE SACRED HEART. 6. THE FELICIAN 
SISTERS, O. S. F. 7. THE SISTERS OF THE HOLY FAMILY 
OF NAZARETH. 8. THE SISTERS OF ST. DOMINIC. 9. THE 
SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS. 



1. THE SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE. 

1845. 

It was in Maine, a province of France, that the community 
of the Sisters of Providence sprang into existence in 1806. 
Maine was the first to repair the fearful ravishes of the reign of 
terror. First and foremost in this work was the saintly Abbe 
Dujarie, pastor of the church of Ruille-sur-Loir, diocese of Le 
Mans. His noble work materialized in the formation of a 
religious community, the Sisters of Providence. His com- 
munity combined the active with the contemplative life. The 
end proposed was to honor divine Providence by the education 
of youth and works of charity. 

The new community grew so rapidly and spread so widely 
that its reputation crossed the Atlantic; and in 1845, when a 
call from the wilds of Indiana reached Ruille, six valiant 
heroines, Mother Theodore the leader, responded. Mother 
Theodore possessed extraordinary mental endowments with a 
remarkable talent for government and a charming personality. 
Her marvelous success in the supervision of first class insti- 
tutions during her nineteen years experience in the community 
had attracted the attention of the Royal Academy, and a 
Prefecture of the "Forty Immortals," after a profound test of 



468 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

her abilities, bestowed upon her medalHon decorations of royal 
distinction. Thus was the saintly foundress eminently fitted 
for her apostolate of education in the New World. In the 
short space of fifteen years her work was accomplished — she 
had solidly established the communtiy. Her work has been 
ably continued by her successors. It has spread from the 
home diocese of Indianapolis to the dioceses of Fort Wayne, 
Grand Rapids, Omaha, Peoria, and to the archdioceses of 
Baltimore, Boston and Chicago. The community now num- 
bers nearly a thousand, with a charge of twenty thousand 
children. St. Mary's Academic Institute, at St. Mary-of-the- 
Wood, is one of the foremost educational centers in the country. 

The Sisters of Providence were the first religious teachers 
in Fort Wayne. At the invitation of Father Benoit three 
Sisters from the infant colony opened St. Augustine's school in 
September, 1845. God blessed the work; it increased and pros- 
pered. New buildings and additions were erected at various 
times, but the Academy stands on the very site of the pioneer 
school. The Golden Jubilee, celebrated in 1895, was par- 
ticipated in by the leading ladies of the city, who claim St. 
Augustine's Academy as their Alma Mater. Another insti- 
tution in Fort Wayne is St. Catharine's Academy, though of 
more recent date. 

Besides these two Academies the Sisters are conducting 
several academies and parochial schools in the diocese: namely, 
in St. Mary's parish in East Chicago; in All Saints', St. Joseph's 
and St. John's parishes at Hammond; in Hartford City; in 
St. Mary's parish at Huntington; in St. Mary's and St. Ann's 
parishes at Lafayette; at Peru and at Whiting. 



2. THE SISTERS OF THE MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD. 

1853. 

The community of the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, 
whose Mother-house is located at Maria Stein, Mercer county, 
Ohio, was established in 1834 at Loewenberg, Switzerland. 
The Very Rev. Francis de Sales Brunner assisted by his saintly 
mother, the Ven. M. Anna Brunner, was the founder. The 
little community was prosperous; its chief object was the 



Religious Communities, Continued. 469 

veneration of the Most Precious Blood. In 1844 it had grown 
to such proportions that it could extend its activity to the 
New World. Father Brunner remained the spiritual director 
of the community till his death in 1859. It was he who, in 
1853, bought two hundred and forty acres of land in Jay county, 
Indiana. A small log house was erected, which served as the 
first convent in the diocese of Fort Wayne. For several years 
the Sisters had to contend with extreme poverty and untold 
hardships. The blessing of God, however, rested upon their 
humble work, and, some years later, a more spacious building 
was erected, large enough to accommodate from forty to forty- 
five Sisters. Two Sisters teach the parochial school, located 
about one-fourth of a mile from the convent. 

Prayer and manual labor form the occupation of the com- 
munity. By day and by night the Precious Blood of Jesus is 
offered to the Heavenly Father not only for the needs of the 
community itself, but also in behalf of Holy Church in general 
and the world at large. The zealous Sisters, engaged also in 
the work of Catholic education, established a parochial school 
at Winamac in 1873, at Garrett in 1888, in St. Joseph's Church 
at Laporte in 1896, in the Precious Blood parish at Fort Wayne 
in 1898, and at Rensselaer in 1903. They have the care also 
of the culinary department in St. Joseph's College and the 
so-called Indian School near Rensselaer. In 1901 the Kneipp 
Sanitarium near Rome City came into their possession. 



3. THE SCHOOL SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME. 

1865. 

On July 31, 1847, a missionary band of four Sisters, 
accompanied by their venerable foundress, landed in New 
York; these four Sisters, known in later years as Mothers 
Caroline, Seraphina, Magdalena and Mary, were the pioneers 
of the School Sisters of Notre Dame in America. St. Peter 
Fourier of Lorraine, founder of the Congregation of these 
Sisters in 1597, is venerated as their special patron. The 
Order instituted by him was introduced into Bavaria, but 
during the troublous times of Napolean I, it was suppressed in 
that country. However, religious education was not to cease, 



470 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

for God raised up two holy men, Bishop Wittmann of Ratisbon 
and Father Sebastian Job of Vienna, whose life's aim was to 
found a teaching Sisterhood for the poorer classes. This they 
succeeded in doing, modifying the Rules of St. Peter Fourier, 
as the times and circumstances demanded. Mother Teresa 
(Gerhardinger), born in 1797, for years a secular teacher under 
the guidance of the pious Bishop, became the first superioress 
of the new Congregation in 1833, at Neunburg, near Ratisbon. 
In 1841 the Mother-house was removed to Munich, and here 
the Mother-general of the School Sisters resided. 

At the invitation of Bishop O'Connor of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, the Sisters came to America, and their first mission, 
which they were obliged to abandon later, was at St. Mary's, 
Elk county, Pennsylvania, a small settlement in the wilderness. 
Mother Teresa remained one year in America, and when she 
returned to Munich the Sisters were teaching at St. Mary's in 
Pennsylvania and in three of the Baltimore schools. In the 
latter city Mother Teresa estabHshed the first American Mother- 
house. In 1850 Mother Caroline was appointed Mother- vicar 
of the American houses, and was directed to open a Mother- 
house in Milwaukee. In 1880 she was elected Commissary- 
general for America; and this office she held till her death in 
1892. The Eastern houses were formed into a separate pro- 
vince in 1876 ,with the Mother-house in Baltimore. A southern 
province, with its Mother-house at Santa Maria in Ripa, South 
St. Louis, was formed in 1897. 

Mother Caroline's labors during the first forty-five years 
of the Congregation's existence in America merited for her the 
veneration due to a foundress. She enjoyed the esteem of the 
Bishops of Fort Wayne; and St. Mary's mission, at Fort Wayne 
was the first established in Indiana, on September 2, 1865. 
The first community consisted of three Sisters and a candidate; 
and they were welcomed warmly by parents and children. 
At that time the attendance at school was two hundred girls; 
the boys being taught by lay-men in the school building on 
the opposite side of the street. In 1880 the Sisters assumed 
charge of the lower and middle classes of the boys' school; and 
ten years later they took the higher class of boys also. The 
enrollment was at that time about four hundred and fifty, 
four Sisters teaching the boys and four the girls, with two grades 



Religious Communities, Continued. 471 

in each room. At the present time the school has an attendance 
of about five hundred and fifty pupils. The Sisters in com- 
munity number fourteen, and eleven of these are engaged in 
teaching. 

The School Sisters took charge of the following schools in 
the diocese of Fort Wayne: Fort Wayne, St. Mary's, in 1865; 
Huntington, SS. Peter and Paul's, in 1868; Logansport, St. 
Joseph's, in 1877; Fort Wayne, St. Peter's, in 1881 ; Chesterton, 
in 1894; Michigan City, St. Mary's, and St. Stanislaus', and 
Alexandria, in 1897; and Lottaville, in 1905. 



4. THE SISTERS OF ST. AGNES. 

1872. 

The community of the Sisters of St. Agnes had its begin- 
ning in 1858, when Rev. Caspar Rehol organized a society of 
young women in Barton, Washington county, Wisconsin; its 
permanent establishment, however, dates from August 1, 1870 
in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, when the Right Rev. J. M. Henni, 
at the time Bishop of Milwaukee, approved the community. 
On July 24th of the same year Mother Mary Agnes (Hazatte) 
was selected Superior General, a position she held till her 
death, March 6, 1905. Their convent was erected in 1877 and 
in 1887 a chapel was added, in the Gothic style of architecture, 
which is said to be one of the finest in the State. The principal 
object of the community of St. Agnes is the Christian education 
of the youth; to which may be added the care of the sick, the 
aged and the orphan. At the present time the Sisters of St. 
Agnes are laboring in ten different dioceses of the United States. 

Their work in the diocese of Fort Wayne dates from 1872, 
when Rev. N. W. Giedl, with the consent of Bishop Dwenger, 
gave them charge of the parochial school at New Haven. Other 
schools in the diocese, of which the Sisters have charge, are the 
following: The parochial school at Columbia City, since 1880; 
at Decatur, since 1881; at Sheldon, since 1882; at Crown Point, 
since 1882; in Muncie, since 1887; at Monterey, since 1894 and 
in Besancon, since 1900. 



472 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

5. THE FRANCISCAN SISTERS OF THE SACRED HEART. 

1876. 

The community of the Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred 
Heart has its Mother-house and Novitiate at Joliet, Illinois. 
Owing to political disturbances in Germany the Order was 
dispersed in 1876 and emigrated to America. They established 
themselves at Avilla, Indiana, but with the consent and 
approval of both Archbishop Feehan and Bishop Dwenger 
they transferred the Mother-house to Joliet, Illinois, in 1883. 
A number of the Sisters, however, remained at Avilla and estab- 
lished there a Home for the Aged Poor, known as the Old 
People's Home. The Rev. D. Duehmig, pastor at Avilla, was 
their special benefactor. The resident chaplains of the Home 
have been: Rev. Joseph Flach, from 1876 till 1878; Rev. 
Theodore Borg, from 1878 till 1887; Rev. John Hoss, from 
1887 till 1889; Rev. Sebastian Ganther C. PP. S., from 1889 
till 1896; and Rev. Bernardine Abbink O. S. F. since 1896. 

The Sisters also engage in the work of education and have 
had charge of the public school in Avilla, from 1877 till 1881, 
when it became a parochial school. Besides this school the 
Sisters have also cared for St. Joseph's school at Hesse Cassel, 
since 1877; of the St. Joseph's school at Dyer, since 1878, being 
a public school until 1901; of St. Ann's school at Ege, since 
1879; and of the parochial school at Schererville, since 1886 
which also was a public school until 1900. 

The community at the present time numbers 268 professed 
Sisters, tw^enty-nine novices and fifty postulants. It has 
charge of nine schools, two orphan asylums and one home for 
the aged poor. 



6. THE FELICIAN SISTERS, O. S. F. 

1880. 

The community of the Felician Sisters was founded in 
Warsaw, Russian Poland, on November 21, 1855 by Mother 
.M. Angela (Miss Sophia Truszkowska) under the direction of 
Rev. Honorat Capuchin. In 1864 the Russian government 
disbanded religious orders and in consequence this community 



Religious Communities, Continued 473 

dispersed. After a short time, however, but not without great 
difficulties the Sisters reorganized in Austria. .A.t the invita- 
tion of Rev. Joseph Dombrowski five FeHcian Sisters emigrated 
from Cracow, Austria, and arrived in this country on Novem- 
ber 21, 1874. They took charge of the PoHsh parochial school 
at Polonia, Portage county, Wisconsin, where the first convent 
of the community in the United States was erected. The 
American province of this order, dependent on the Mother- 
house in Cracow with a provincial house and novitiate in 
Detroit, Michigan, was established in 1882. Since 1900 an- 
other .Mother-house and novitiate for the East was opened at 
Doyle, Erie county, New York. 

The Felician Sisters at the request of Rev. J. Machdzicki, 
pastor of St. Mary's Church at Otis took charge of the parochial 
school of that place in the year 1880, of which they have charge 
at the present time. 

This community has a membership of about 800 Sisters 
in the United States ; in charge of seventy-four parochial schools, 
four orphanages, two asylums for the aged poor and one hospital. 



7. THE SISTERS OF THE HOLY FAMILY OF NAZARETH. 

1902. 

The community of the Sisters of the Holy Family of 
Nazareth was founded, under the auspices of Pope Pius IX, 
in Rome, in the year 1874, by a noble Polish lady, who died 
in the odor of sanctitv on November 21, 1902. The good 
works in which the Sisters are engaged are Christian education, 
the care of the sick, and also the care and education of orphans. 
The .Most Rev. Patrick A. Feehan, Archbishop of Chicago, 
introduced the Order into the United States, in the year 1885. 
These Sisters have their Mother-house in Rome, of which 
Mother .Mary Lauretta is Superior General, at the present time. 
The Provincial-house in the United States is located at Chicago, 
where Mother Mary Sophia is Superior Provincial. They have 
charge of the parochial shool of St. Casimir's and St. Stanis- 
laus' Churches, at South Bend. They conduct institutions 
also in the Archdiocese of Chicago and Philadelphia, and the 
dioceses of Brooklyn, Columbus, Pittsburg and Scranton. The 



474 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

community has 500 Sisters, conducting twenty-seven parochial 
schools, one academy, one hospital, and one orphanage. 



8. THE SISTERS OF ST. DOMINIC. 

The Mother-house of the Sisters of St. Dominic is located 
at Adrian, Michigan. These Sisters have charge of the paro- 
chial schools at Earl Park, and of St. Bavo's, at Mishawaka. 



9. THE SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS. 

1906. 

The Mother-house of the community of the Sisters of St. 
Francis is located at Maryville, Missouri, in connection with 
St. Francis' Hospital. It was founded with the approbation 
of Right Rev. Maurice F. Burke, Bishop of St. Joseph, Missouri, 
in the year 1894. The beginning of the institution dates from 
September 8th, of that year, when the Sisters took up their 
residence in a dwelling house, which had been remodeled into 
a twelve-room temporary hospital. These quarters were 
found inadequate and a building 68x50 feet, containing forty- 
two rooms was completed on November 26, 1895; but an 
addition of 46x92 feet was found necessary. Still another 
addition was made in 1903; so that now St. Francis' Hospital, 
located on a block between Davis and Saunders streets, fronting 
on Front street, is a large three-story and basement brick 
structure, 160x92 feet. The building has eighty rooms, a 
beautiful chapel and a large dormitory for the Sisters. Mother 
M. Augustine is Superior with forty Sisters under her charge. 
Among other hospitals they have charge of the Wabash rail- 
way hospital at Peru, known as St. Ann's Hospital. 



CHAPTER XXIII, 



INSTITUTIONS OF CHARITY. 



DIOCESAN ORPHAN ASYLUMS. 

The Civil War, which spent itself at the cost of much life 
and wealth, left after it the orphan. Many of these were 
CathoHc and, although the State made pubUc provision for 
their support, it was plain that something must be done to 
save these children to the Faith. It was Bishop Luers, who 
initiated this great work of charity in the spring of 1865, when 
he purchased a tract of land in the suburbs of Fort Wayne, as 
the site for an orphan asylum. First his Vicar-General, the 
Very Rev. Julian Benoit, and later on the Rev. E. P. Walters, 
were commissioned by the Bishop to solicit money, for the 
erection of the necessary buildings. When, in the fall of 1865, 
Pope Pius IX proclaimed a solemn Jubilee, for the gaining of 
the indulgence of which an alms was required for some work 
of charity. Bishop Luers designated the orphan asylum as this 
special charity. He also addressed several pastoral letters to 
his diocesans, in one of which he says: "In our day, many 
sympathize as little with poor Jesus as did the Jews of old, 
who only longed for a rich Messiah. They seek Him to this 
day without finding him, as Christ Himself told them. The 
promises of God in regard to the poor are disregarded, because 
the painful vices of avarice and pride have taken possession 
of their hearts. The spirit of religion and the love of neighbor 
impelled our forefathers, to erect magnificent churches, schools, 
orphan asylum.s, hospitals, universities, and other like institu- 
tions, to give learned men and saints to the land. Within 
these institutions men were trained for the object of their exist- 
ence, and while the Te Deum resounds within those time 
honored walls, it is reechoed by the saints above, who erected 
those buildings." 

Much as the Bishop desired to commence the erection of 
the asylum, in 1866, unavoidable delays occurred in carrying 
out his plans. The following extract from an admirable 



476 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

address on this subject, sent out immediately after the spiritual 
retreat of the clergy held at Notre Dame in 1867, will explain 
the situation: "Dearly Beloved in Christ:— The number of 
orphans has lately increased to such an extent, that the erection 
of an asylum for them has become an imperative necessity. 
It is a holy duty, incumbent upon us all, to take care of the 
spiritual and bodily wants of those, who have no longer father 
and mother to do it for them, and who like strangers now 
wander over God's wide earth, imploring our pity, mercy, and 
love. A year ago 1 purchased twenty-five acres of land, 
adjoining the city, for the purpose of building such an asylum 
upon it; but as yet it has not been commenced. On this all 
important matter I consulted with the clergy, lately assembled 
in spiritual retreat at Notre Dame, and as building materials 
and labor are yet very high, the building to be erected would 
cost from |30,000 to $35,000, which amount would have to 
be on hand immediately. To obtain this seems to be a matter 
of impossibility. It was therefore unanimously agreed, to 
accept the favorable offer of the Spilter Farm at Rensselaer, 
for 118,000. This place contains 933 acres; 650 of which are 
under fence, 200 under cultivation, 200 wood, the balance 
prairie. There are on it two dwelling houses, one of which 
contains twelve rooms, affording accommodation for forty or 
fifty orphans. Experience teaches that not a few of those, 
who have been raised in the asylums of our large cities, for 
want of suitable employment and from other unavoidable 
causes, have not realized the expectations, considering the 
extraordinary care and attention bestowed upon them. Here, 
upon the farm selected, the children can have employment 
suitable to their age and strength, and growing up with indus- 
trious habits, they can become men, who will be an honor to 
the institution, and a source of consolation to their benefactors." 
Having purchased the Spilter Farm, Bishop Luers ap- 
pointed the Revs. E. P. Walters, George Steiner, J. Mayer, 
P. P. Cooney C. S. C., to collect throughout the diocese, and 
to prepare the buildings on the farm for the orphans. The 
Rev. Joseph Stephan was given charge of the institution. In 
September of 1868, thirty-five orphans found shelter here 
under the care of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. A circular 
addressed to the Clergy and Laity of the diocese, and dated 



Institutions of Charity, Continued. 477 

at Fort Wayne December 10, 1869, is characteristic of Bishop 
Luers, and reads as follows: 

"We shall soon celebrate the Festival, which commemo- 
rates the Birth of the Redeemer of the world, and presents to 
our view the Divine Babe, lying in the manger of Bethlehem. 
The recurrence of this Festival is an occasion of great joy, 
especially to those families, whose members habitually fulfill 
their religious duties; and if in some there is negligence in the 
service of God during the year, Christmas is a time of recon- 
ciliation; all may, therefore, participate in the joy of this 
Festival. In these days of rejoicing, when you give thanks 
to God for the birth of your Saviour, and for all the spiritual 
gifts that flow therefrom, as well as the comforts of life which 
you have received from His bountiful hand, remember the 
poor in the orphans, who appeal to you to help them in their 
need, to clothe them and give them shelter from the frost and 
rain, and to prevent them from perishing with hunger. 

"As God has given you the fruits of this world, lay up 
for yourselves a treasure in heaven, by giving of your abundance 
to those who are in want. Do not begrudge a couple of dollars 
to the orphans. Be more manly, more human and more 
generous, than to make a wry face over a small portion of 
your abundance, given to the poor. God loves a cheerful 
giver. Do not, then, part with a few dollars, as if so many 
sound teeth were being pulled out of your head. Open wide 
your purse, give with a generous heart; avoid the stigma of 
stinginess, that mark of little souls and sordid hearts. Have 
a laudable respect for yourselves, as men occupying respectable 
positions in society, as Christians professing to be followers of 
our Lord, who loved the poor, and do not give merely twenty- 
five cents, when you could give four times that amount; do 
not place ten cents upon the collection plate, when you could 
give at least half that number of dollars. That you all may 
have an opportunity of fulfilling your duty of giving alms, we 
hereby direct that on Christmas-day the usual collection be 
made, in all the churches and stations, for the benefit of the 
Orphan Asylum, in which you should all take the greatest 
interest. Invoking upon you the abundant graces, which the 
Infant Jesus desires to bestow upon you all, and most par- 
ticularly wishing that your hearts may be touched by com- 



478 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

passion for God's suffering poor, we commend you all to the 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, and to the Patronage of Our Lady of 
the Sacred Heart." 

Bishop Luers seemed quite at home, with his children at 
the orphan asylum. He used to assign work to them, and took 
part in their devotions and in their sports. He looked after 
the interests of the asylum, wherever opportunity offered, 
and after his death it was discovered, that he had had his life 
insured for $10,000, for their benefit. 

The house on the Spilter farm was turned into a Sisters' 
residence and school. Bishop Luers erected a two-story build- 
ing for |3,000, the first story of which was used for a chapel, 
and the upper story for a dormitory and the pastor's residence, 
for which three rooms were set aside. Father Stephan, the 
first priest in charge, remained until 1870. He was succeeded 
by: Rev. Henry Renson, about one year; Rev. August Young, 
from August 16, 1869 to October 1871; Rev. Bernard Kroeger, 
from September 1872 till March 1, 1875; Rev. B. Hartmann, 
from March 1, 1875 till August 1876; Rev. Matthias Zumbuelte, 
from August 1876 till January 27, 1887. 

Father Kroeger erected a two-story building, where St. 
Joseph's College now stands; the lower story of which was 
used for a school and two rooms for hired men, and the second 
story served as a dormitory for the girls. The cost of this 
building was about $1,600. 



1. ST. JOSEPH'S ASYLUM FOR BOYS. 

The Rev. George A. Hamilton, pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Lafayette, who died April 8, 1875, bequeathed in his will real 
estate and money to the value of about $10,000, for the estab- 
lishment of a manual labor school for orphan boys, in the 
vicinity of Lafayette. The real estate included 580 acres, 
located between Lafayette and the Battle Grounds. This land 
had been devised to Father Hamilton by William B. Davis, 
better known as Indian Bill. Besides this gift, another dona- 
tion of fifty-one acres of land south of Lafayette, was made by 
Owen Ball and J. B. Falley. On this land. Bishop Dwenger 
began the building of St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum for boys, 
in 1875. It is a four-story structure with a basement covering 



Institutions of Charity, Continued. 479 

an area of 121x113 feet; the to\yer of it rises to a height of 
seventy-five feet, and affords a fine view of the city and sur- 
rounding country. The cost was |33,000. In April 1876, 
thirty-five orphan boys from the asylum at Rensselaer took 
up their abode here, in charge of seven Sisters of the Holy 
Cross, Rev. B. Hartmann being the chaplain, who remained 
till July 1880. After him, the Rev. John H. Guendling had 
charge until July 20, 1898, when he was succeded by his brother, 
the Rev. Charles B. Guendling, who has had the care of the 
institution since July 20, 1898. When the Sisters of the Holy 
Cross were recalled to Notre Dame, the Sisters of St. Francis, 
from the Mother-House at Lafayette, succeeded them at St. 
Joseph's Asylum in 1894. 

Additional ground of eighty acres was bought by Father 
John Guendling for |4,300. This tract of land lies due east 
of the Asylum, extending to Ninth street and the Big Four 
railway tracks on the south. Within the past four years a 
fine stretch of land on the west side has been reclaimed from 
the condition of a swamp, and is now known as the Orphan 
Park. The Ferry-boat and equipment with admiralty rights 
on navigable rivers was bought for |1,200. The Board of 
Works of the city of Lafayette donated the institution per- 
petual free water, and the promise of the city Fire Apparatus 
when needed. 

The house on the farm was enlarged to double its capacity. 
The Ferry received a new outfit of boat, cable, ropes and 
ferry-man's house, at a cost of 1 1,350. After much hard work 
and the expenditure of considerable money the Asylum is in 
first class condition, and the surroundings present an attractive 
appearance. In like manner the farm has improved and is 
also at the present time all that could be desired. 

Father Charles Guendling states that during the past 
twenty-seven years the cash maintenance of a child averages 
annually about $44.00; this includes clothing, shoes, schooling, 
medicine, board and lodging, amounting actually to about 
eleven cents a day. The Asylum has had under its roof about 
1284 children; 163 were baptized, 487 made their first Com- 
munion there and 385 were confirmed; and thirty-eight died. 
At the present time the Asylum has the care of 133 children. 
It has been estimated that the improvements and repairs 



480 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

made by Father John Guendling amounted to |27,000, and 
those made by Father Charles Guendling aggregating the sum 
of 129,000. 

2. ST. VINCENT'S ORPHAN ASYLUM FOR GIRLS. 

In the years 1886 and 1887, the twenty-five acres of 
ground, located within the present corporate limits of Fort 
Wayne, bought by Bishop Luers, were utilized by his suc- 
cessor. Bishop Dwenger, who erected on it the present St. 
Vincent's Orphan Asylum. The building is of brick, has a 
basement and four stories, the tower having a height of 
125 feet. The basement contains vegetable and fruit cellars. 
The chapel, 24x55 feet, with sacristy, reception parlor, dining- 
room, sewing-room, kitchen and bakery are on the first floor. 
The second floor has two school-rooms, four room^ for the 
Sisters, sewing-room, spare-room, nursery and infirmary. A 
second infirmary, another spare-room, linen-rooms, bath- 
rooms, etc., are located on the third floor, the latter also on 
the second floor. The fourth floor has a linen-room and a 
large dormitory. The building covers an area of 126x100 feet, 
and was erected at an outlay of |49,289. 

In 1905 the Knights of Columbus realized about $9,000 
by the holding of a fair for the benefit of the asylum. This 
money was spent in the erection of a laundry building and a 
complete laundry outfit. The play-house was also built, as 
well as a hennery with an incubator. A beautiful grotto was 
supplied by the former orphans of the institution at a cost of 
several hundred dollars. The building is provided with con- 
venient fire escapes. 

The total number of orphan girls cared for up to date is 
866: at the present time the inmates number 106. The Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ have had charge of this institution 
from the beginning, at present there are twelve Sisters and 
one postulant. The Rev. B. T. Borg was the first resident 
chaplain, from 1887 till December 22, 1904, the date of his 
death. The Fathers C. PP. S. residing at the mission-house 
in connection with the Church of the Most Precious Blood, 
attended the Asylum from the death of Father Borg till April 
1, 1907; on which date the present resident chaplain, Rev. 
L. R. Paquet, was appointed. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 



INSTITUTIONS OF CHARITY, 
CONTINUED. 



HOSPITALS. 



The diocese of Fort Wayne is rich in hospitals conducted 
by religious communities. They are found dotting the diocese 
in every direction, and are the best evidence of active Christian 
Charity and of the most generous support by Catholics and 
non-Catholics. All these hospitals are in a most flourishing 
condition. A list of them with a short sketch of each is given 
here, in the chronological order of their establishment: 



1. ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, AT FORT WAYNE. 

1869. 

St. Joseph's Hospital, located on the corner of Main street 
and Broadway in Fort Wayne, was established on May 9, 1869. 
The building on this site, known as the Rock-hill Place was 
remodeled and is now a part of the hospital. The convent of 
the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, their Mother-house in 
America, is in connection with the hospital, as also a normal 
school for the teaching Sisters. Additions have been made of 
the south wing, 130x30 feet in 1892 and in 1896 a fourth story 
was added to the old building for a spacious operating room, 
equipped with all modern conveniences. The hospital has a 
second operating room on the first floor of the south wing. 
The average number of patients is from 800 to 900 annually. 
It is open to all, rich and poor, regardless of race, language or 
creed. The chaplains of the convent also attend to the spiritual 
needs of the patients. These chaplains have been three in 
number: Rev. Theodore Hibbelen till February 2, 1886, Rev. 



482 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Julius Becks till December 3, 1889, and since that time the 
Rev. Thomas Eisenring, C. PP. S. 



2. ST. ELISABETH'S HOSPITAL, AT LAFAYETTE. 

1875. 

When the Sisters of St. Francis of Perpetual Adoration 
entered upon their work of charity, they were unknown and 
without means. Until October 1876 they lived in a small 
house placed at their disposal, but on June 11, 1876 the corner 
stone of the beginning of St. Elisabeth's Hospital was laid on 
two lots donated by Albert Wagner. The east wing was added 
in 1879 and in 1883 the west wing and the chapel. So great 
was the demand made on the hospital that further additions 
became necessary in 1896 and were formally opened on January 
6, 1897. The present imposing structure completing the 
original plans of the hospital was perfected in 1905, when on 
December 31st Bishop Alerding solemnly dedicated the institu- 
tion and the new chapel. The building is a substantial three 
story structure of brick and stone with basement and attic. 
The basement contains kitchen, dining rooms, and rooms for 
domestic purposes. On the first floor are the offices, parlors, 
private rooms and dispensary. On the second and third floors 
are dormitories and private rooms. All the floors are reached 
by elevator. The physicians' lavatory and operating room are 
thoroughly equipped. All the arrangements are modern and 
complete throughout. Patients are received without distinc- 
tion as to creed, race or nationality, whether rich or poor. 



3. ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, AT SOUTH BEND. 

1882. 

St. Joseph's Hospital at South Bend was established 
October 20, 1882 in a building, which had been utilized for 
church and parochial school purposes. The increasing demands 
for hospital accommodations led to the erection of the present 
building, situated on one of the highest points of the city and 
commanding a beautiful view of the surrounding country. 



Institutions of Charity, Continued. 483 

The corner-stone was laid with becoming solemnity by Bishop 
Alerding, on April 26, 1903. The new building was ready to 
receive patients in February 1905. The structure is of red 
pressed brick with stone trimmings, with a frontage of 156 
feet and a depth of 100 feet; the main building is three stories 
and the two wings two stories each in height. It has a capacity 
to accommodate 100 patients. The hospital is in every respect 
perfectly equipped for its purposes. 

The Sisters of the Holy Cross have charge of the insti- 
tution. 



4. ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, AT LOGANSPORT. 

1893. 

The Franciscan Sisters of Lafayette purchased the prop- 
erty, which they now occupy in Logansport for Hospital 
purposes, in the year 1893, for the sum of |10,000. The hos- 
pital began to receive patients on the 4th day of October of 
the same year. Twelve beds was all the accommodation the 
hospital had in the beginning, with Sister M. Adriana Super- 
ioress, and three nurses. In the first year of its existence the 
hospital treated within its walls 108 patients; twenty-four of 
whom paid in full, ten paid in part and seventy-four were 
charity patients. So great was the patronage given the hos- 
pital during the first year of its existence, that in 1894 the 
building had to be enlarged. The sum of |3,000 was spent 
on the addition and now the building can accommodate twice 
the original number of patients. The hospital has all the 
modern improvements in regard to heating, lighting and water. 
It has six private rooms, two wards, operating rooms, drug 
store, and other necessary adjuncts. The average number of 
patients treated annually up to the present time is about 270. 
Quite a number of the patients became converts to the Church. 

The Rev. J. A. Mark was the chaplain from 1897 till 1904. 
The present chaplain is the Rev. F. A. King. The usefulness 
of St. Joseph's Hospital is made evident by the increased 
patronage bestowed on it to such an extent, that preparations 
are being made for the erection of a new structure. 



484 Tie Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

5. ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL, AT ANDERSON. 
1894. 

St. John's Hospital, at Anderson, owes its existence to 
Mr. John Hickey, a native of Ireland and a resident of Anderson, 
since 1853. It was founded in 1894, in which year, on March 
31st, he deeded his homestead, situated between Jackson and 
Brown streets, to the Sisters of the Holy Cross. The frame 
building was repaired and remodeled, but proved to be too 
small to accommodate all the patients desiring admission. In 
consequence one wing of the present building was erected in 
1895; it being constructed of brick, 72x45 feet, two stories 
high, costing about $9,000. The main building was erected in 
1900 and cost |23,600. The dedication took place on October 
21st, of the same year. The hospital contains forty rooms for 
patients, exclusive of the chaplain's apartments. In 1906 the 
old frame building was moved back of the main building, 
where it is now utilized as a laundry. The grounds consist of 
ten acres and have been much improved by paved streets, a 
drive-way, etc. 

Rev. D. J. Mulcahy, pastor of St. Mary's Church attended 
to the spiritual wants of the hospital till June 17, 1897, when 
Rev. Julius Becks was made the first resident chaplain, remain- 
ing till his death on March 14, 1902. Since then the institution 
is attended by the pastor or his assistant from St. Mary's 
Church. 

The success and growth of this hospital is due above all 
to the generosity of Mr. John Hickey, who made many dona- 
tions including his final bequest by will, when he died on 
March 3, 1906; then to the city officials, the manufacturing 
companies, the merchants of Anderson, the members of the 
leading societies and clubs, religious and secular, the devoted 
physicians and surgeons of the city, the pastor and his assist- 
ants, and last but not least, to the zeal and hard work of the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross themselves. 



6. ST. MARGARET'S HOSPITAL, AT HAMMOND. 

1898. 

St. Margaret's Hospital, conducted by the Sisters of St. 
Francis of Perpetual Adoration, was opened on February 2, 



Institutions of Charity, Continued. 485 

1898. The dwelling house, which stood on the site purchased 
for the hospital, was used at the time; it afforded room only 
for twenty patients. The growth and the prosperity of the 
city of Hammond, and the demand on the Sisters' charity, 
soon rendered the erection of a larger building imperative. 
The corner-stone of the present building was laid by Very Rev. 
John GuendUng, Administrator of the diocese, on October 1, 

1899. The hospital has a measurement of 50x100 feet with 
four stories and a basement; the whole being equipped with 
all modern improvements. It can accommodate seventy 
patients. The solemn dedication took place on October 4, 

1900. In 1904 additional grounds were purchased, so that the 
extension of the building when necessary can be made. A 
building, entirely apart from the main hospital, is used for 
patients afflicted with contagious diseases. Desirous to do 
the greatest good to the greatest number patients are received 
without distinction as to creed, race or nationality, the rich 
having no preference over the poor. 



7. ST. ROCH'S SANITARIUM, AT FORT WAYNE. 

1899. 

St. Roch's Sanitarium for consumptives is located in the 
immediate vicinity of Fort Wayne. It was opened on Decem- 
ber 3, 1899. The chapel in connection with this institution 
dates from March 24, 1900 and in it Mass is celebrated on all 
Sundays and Holydays and on every Saturday throughout the 
year by the chaplain of St. Joseph's Hospital. The Poor 
Handmaids of Jesus Christ have charge of the sanitarium. 



8. THE HOLY FAMILY HOSPITAL, AT LAPORTE. 

1900. 

The Holy Family Hospital at Laporte is conducted by 
Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ. Its doors were opened to 
receive patients on March 1, 1900, with Sister Helena super- 
ioress and four assistants. The building, a frame structure 
was bought for |2,500 and to it a year later an addition of 



486 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

thirty feet was made. In this way accommodations were 
secured for about twenty persons. Later on an adjoining lot, 
which had on it a small house, was acquired for |1,500. This 
house was occupied by the Sisters and served also for hospital 
kitchen. Having provided a heating system as well as lighting 
and water appHances the Sisters had an outlay altogether of 
about 111,000. During the six years of its existence this 
hospital has had the care of about 1000 patients, of whom one- 
half or one-third received treatment and shelter without 
remuneration. The accommodations fall far short of meeting 
the demands made for admission. 



9. THE KNEIPP SANITARIUM, AT ROME CITY. 

1901. 

Until the year 1901 Doctor W. Geiermann had been con- 
ducting a Kneipp Sanitarium at Rome City, a noted summer 
resort in Noble county. The Sisters of the Most Precious 
Blood secured this sanitarium by purchase in the year named. 
The dimensions of this institution at the time were very limited. 
The Sisters set to work at once to provide more room and 
better accommodations for the rapidly increasing number of 
patients. The new building was completed in the spring of 
1903, but before three years had elapsed, the completion of 
this structure according to original plans had become an 
imperative necessity. The sanitarium affords accommodations 
for upwards of 100 patients. One of the principal features of 
the institution is its beautiful chapel which has a seating 
capacity of 200. The chapel was dedicated by Bishop Alerding 
on June 21, 1903. Besides carefully attending to the wants 
of the patients the Sisters are also engaged in the perpetual 
adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. Prayer and labor are 
the constant occupation of these devoted adorers of the Most 
Precious Blood. 



10. THE SACRED HEART HOSPITAL, AT GARRETT. 

1901. 

On April 13, 1901 the Rev. A. Young purchased the 
residence with four lots on the corner of Houston and Ijam 



Institutions of Charity, Continued. 487 

streets, at Garrett, located one -square West of the church. 
Here the Sacred Heart Hospital was opened. Father Young 
gave the Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred Heart charge of it. 
The accommodations were found wholly insufficient and in 
1902 the erection of a new hospital was begun. The dimensions 
are 40x120 feet, having a basement of eleven feet in the clear 
and over it two stories with two verandas the full length in 
the front and on the south side. It is one of the finest and 
best equipped hospitals of its size. Two additional lots adjoin- 
ing were secured giving the hospital grounds a frontage of 150 
feet with a depth of 125 feet. The value of the property, 
which has cost upward of |62,000 and which is clear of every 
indebtedness, was presented by Father Young to the Franciscan 
Sisters of the Sacred Heart, in July 1903. The name of Father 
Young is inscribed on the face of the corner-stone. The hospital 
was solemnly dedicated by Bishop Alerding on May 17, 1903. 

The number of Sisters in charge of the hospital is ten, and 
during the year 1906, 303 patients were cared for. 



11. ST. ANTHONY'S HOSPITAL, AT MICHIGAN CITY. 

1903. 

In 1902 Mrs. John Bluett donated an entire block on 
Wabash street between Ripley and Anne streets, in Michigan 
City, to the Sisters of St. Francis of Lafayette, for the purposes 
of a hospital. The citizens of Michigan City, Catholic and 
non-Catholic, took a very general interest in the coming St. 
Anthony's Hospital, which the Sisters proposed to erect. A 
general subscription was taken to collect the necessary funds 
and a fair and a number of festivals were held to assist in the 
enterprise. The lady who donated the ground, and the Hon. 
John H. Barker who gave in cash |10,000, are the principal 
benefactors of the institution. The corner-stone was laid on 
October 9, 1903 and the building was dedicated on November 
11, 1904 by Bishop Alerding, amid the concourse of a vast 
attendance of people. The cost of the building was $85,000. 
Sister Valeria the local superior was most active in bringing 
about the erection of St. Anthony's Hospital. Her noble life 
was brought to an abrupt conclusion in an accident caused by 



488 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

the elevator in July 1906. The hospital is a structure with a 
basement, three stories and an attic, constructed of brick and 
stone. The basement has in it the kitchen, the dining rooms 
and rooms for domestic purposes. The first two floors have 
the offices, parlors, private rooms and dispensary. The third 
floor contains the chapel, private rooms and operating room 
which latter is well equipped with all that is required for a 
perfectly appointed room of this kind. The attic is used for 
dormitories. The laundry has a separate building. 



12. ST. ANN'S HOSPITAL, AT PERU. 

St. Ann's Hospital is the property of the Wabash railroad 
company. This company appreciates the services of the 
Sisters, in the care of the sick, to such a degree that it has given 
the Sisters of St. Francis, whose Mother-house is located at 
Maryville, Missouri, full charge of the company's hospital at 
Peru. Since July 1, 1906, four Sisters have the care of the 
patients at this hospital. 



CHAPTER XXV. 



INSTITUTIONS OF CHARITY, 
CONTINUED. 



1. THE OLD people's HOME, AVILLA, 1876. 2. ST. ANTHONY's 
HOME FOR THE AGED, LAFAYETTE, 1897. 



1. The Old People's Home at Avilla was founded in 1876, 
by Mother Anastasia (Bischler), a member of the Franciscan 
Sisters of the Sacred Heart. In consequence of the Kultur- 
kampf in Germany, the community was banished from their 
native country. Rev. Dominic Duehmig assisted the Sisters 
in every way to secure their estabhshment at Avilla. A farm 
which had on it a frame building was bought from Thomas 
Storey, for 1 12,000. This house and a small chapel erected in 
the same year served the Sisters from 1876 until 1883. During 
this time the Sisters took care of a few old people and a number 
of orphans. 

The present Home, a brick building, was erected in 1895, 
and the old house was removed. The Home, as it stands at 
present, has necessitated an expense of $40,000; most of this 
money being furnished by the Mother-house at Joliet, Illinois. 
The building and the grounds answer the purpose for which 
they are intended in every respect. 

The first chaplain of the home was Rev. Joseph Flach, 
who, recently ordained, also emigrated from Germany on 
account of the persecution of Catholics raging there. He 
crossed the ocean with the Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred 
Heart, and arrived at Avilla in the year 1876, remaining there 
as chaplain till March 1878. From that date until 1896, the 
following priests were chaplains at the Home; Rev. B. Theo- 
dore Borg, Rev. John Hoss, Rev. Sebastian Ganther, C. PP. S. 
The present chaplain, Rev. Bernardine Abbink, O. S. F.. has 
been chaplain at the Home since April 29, 1896. 

Since 1896 one hundred and twenty-one old people have 



490 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

been cared for. At the present time there are forty-two old 
people, and the Home is in charge of eleven Sisters. 

2. In 1897 the Sisters of St. Francis bought a tract of 
land, several acres in extent near Lafayette, on which stood a 
house, which was opened as St. Anthony's Home for the Aged. 
A large and well appointed building was erected and dedicated 
on October 6, 1903. An extensive grove of old forest trees 
adjoins the property, and the surroundings are beautiful. 
Removed from the noise of the city, yet easy of access, the 
Home is an ideal place for aged people to spend their declining 
years, under the fostering care of the Sisters of St. Francis. 
There is room for sixty-five inmates; the number of Sisters 
employed is eleven. 



CHAPTER XXV! 



EDUCATION.* 

HISTORICAL REVIEW — SCHOOL BOARD — SCHOOL VISITORS — AP- 
POINTMENT OF SUPERINTENDENT — COURSE OF STUDY — 
SUPERVISION — TRAINING OF TEACHERS — ORGANIZATION OF 
THE SCHOOLS — SITES AND PREMISES — DUTIES OF CHILDREN 
IN REGARD TO ATTENDANCE — SPECIAL SCHOOLS — SCHOOLS 
OF HIGHER LEARNING. 



Historical Review.- -No history of the diocese of Fort 
Wayne could be written without giving special prominence to 
a subject, which has been one of the main factors in the 
development of the diocese, and has always been its pride 
and glory, — the subject of Catholic education. 

At the advent of the first Bishop of Fort Wayne in 1857, 
Catholic education was already here and extended to him a hand 
of welcome. No greater consolation could have been offered 
to Monssigneur Luers, as he faced the difficulties of his early 
administration and gazed with anxious eye into the future, 
than the hopeful promise he could discern in the fact that 
already there were in his young diocese, schools for the ele- 
mentary and secondary education of the rising generation, and 
priests and people filled with an ardent desire to promote the 
work already begun. There were only three schools and one 
college when he came, but under his wise leadership they 
rapidly increased in number and when he died there were in 
existence forty schools and a university. 

It is impossible to give full credit to this worthy Bishop, 
to the priests, teachers and people, who in those days of poverty 
and frightful struggle for the necessities of life, made such 
heroic sacrifices for the cause of Christian education, and made 
possible the advantages which we now enjoy. 

*By the Rev. A. E. Lafontaine, Diocesan Superintendent of Schools. 



492 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Bishop Luers encouraged the building of schools every- 
where he went, and in purchasing sites for churches, always 
included a site for the school. He was so out-spoken in his 
advocacy of Christian and Catholic education for our people 
that he was often attacked in the public press. Many of his 
priests helped to build the schools out of their own scant means 
and even taught the schools themselves notwithstanding their 
arduous duties. The people were correspondingly generous, 
and we are thankful, for we realize how difficult it would have 
been later on to establish Catholic schools and mould Catholic 
opinion to the proper appreciation of Catholic training in a 
Catholic atmosphere if the youth of those days had been 
educated in the new pubHc schools which were just then 
springing up over the entire state. Other dioceses had to 
create their Catholic system of education in the presence of a 
well developed system of public instruction, with its many 
material advantages, and history tells us under what enormous 
difificulties they labored and how the most earnest desires and 
energetic efforts of zealous Bishops were thwarted for years. 

The schools of course labored under many disadvantages; 
the buildings were small and poorly suited to their purpose, 
the furnishings were of the most crude character and conven- 
iences of all kinds were conspicuous by their absence. Some- 
times the pupils were taught in the Church or in the house of 
the pastor. It was impossible to have long terms and more 
impossible still to exercise any choice in regard to the teachers, 
some of whom were men without professional training, whose 
main recommendation was their ability to instruct the choir 
and play the organ. Some were far from being models to the 
children they had to teach, others, however, be it noted, were 
men one would hardly expect to find in a calling so poorly 
remunerated in those days, graduates of a college or university 
eminently fitted to teach any school by their profound knowl- 
edge and splendid character. But these men it was hard to 
keep. They passed on to positions more suited to their attain- 
ments and the difficulties with regard to teachers in our ele- 
mentary schools were only gradually overcome by the arrival 
in'^the diocese of the different Sisterhoods on whom we now 
depend and have depended ever since. 

Bishop Luers was taken away suddenly on June 29, 1871, 



Education, Continued. 493 

and was succeeded by Bishop Dwenger, a man in his prime, of 
vigorous mind and body, who devoted his splendid talents, 
strong convictions, boundless enthusiasm and indefatigable 
energy to continue the work so auspiciously begun under his 
predecessor. He became in truth the champion of Catholic 
education and was incessant in his urgings to his priests to 
gather the children of their own parishes into schools of their 
own, to protect them against the evil influences of Godless 
schools, to preserve them in their innocence, and simplicity of 
heart, to enlighten their minds with supernatural knowledge 
and to fire their hearts with sincere love for God, Church and 
country. His motto was, "Catholic schools for Catholic 
children." A frequent expression of his was: "Catholic 
schools now or empty churches a few years hence." He urged 
the Catholic people to make their rallying cry and leading 
principle: "Good parochial schools and a free Catholic edu- 
cation for our children." 

During his administration the diocese made wonderful 
progress; new churches and parochial residences were erected 
and in many places the inadequate frame school buildings were 
replaced by commodious brick edifices. In the parishes in 
which it was impossible to build a separate church and school 
house, the churches were built in two stories, the lower one 
serving as a school. 

In order to promote the success of education, he established 
a school board in 1879, giving to the diocese a distinction 
enjoyed by none other, if we except Rochester, before the 
Council of Baltimore. He also advocated the establishment 
of high schools and in a strong letter, he even commanded that 
central high schools for boys be erected in the large cities, 
through the common efforts of the different parishes. So 
successful was he in his zealous endeavors that when he was 
taken away, all too soon, and we might say still a young man, 
there were seventy schools and several academies in his diocese. 

A few quotations wall serve to set in relief his convictions 
on the subject of Catholic education. 

"When we foster a generation of good, practical intelli- 
gent Catholics, we secure all the elements required to discharge 
every duty commanded by Holy Church and to fulfill all the 
works of charity impHed in the CathoHc name." "The Catholic 



494 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

school should be looked upon as an essential and integral part 
of the church and hence the necessary expense for its support 
should be defrayed by the congregation in general." "In the 
teaching of the secular branches required in the ordinary 
affairs of life, the parochial schools of the diocese must not 
allow themselves to be excelled by any institution of similar 
grade in the land." "Catholics should be taught to understand 
and feel that the school is an integral part of the church, yea, 
in our age and country the very foundation thereof. They 
should be taught to understand and feel in their consciences 
that it is as necessary to have a good Catholic school to give 
their children a good Catholic education, as it is to have a 
Church, divine service and the word of God preached to them. 
It is a most sacred duty of parents to send their children to a 
Catholic school where such exists in their midst. Neither 
guilty parents neglecting to do this, nor willing children fre- 
quenting the Godless public school instead of going to the 
Catholic school, may receive the sacraments. If they do 
receive absolution from a strange priest by concealing the 
truth they commit a sacrilege. This duty of Catholics is so 
plainly taught by reason, by Sacred Scriptures, by the numerous 
decisions of Popes and Councils that there can be no doubt of 
it. We refer to the words of St. Paul, that he who neglects 
those of his household has denied the faith and is worse than 
an infidel." 

"There can be no doubt that in our age and especially in 
our country our youth will lose their religion unless they are 
thoroughly instructed in Catholic schools. The dangers to 
religion are so great and so manifold that unless we prepare 
our children well they will certainly fail. If we allow the pure 
fertile field of their innocent hearts to become covered with 
weeds, it will be almost useless to sow afterward the seed of 
our holy faith. If they grow up as heathens it will be very 
hard or impossible to convert them. Children who have to 
answer the fierce and constant warfare waged against our holy 
faith, must be well instructed and disciplined. In this contest 
the school is as necessary as the Church and in its peculiar 
place even more so. Our work is not perfect, but we can work 
and work we will cheerfully and harmoniously for the greatest 
and most important object of the present time— Catholic 



Education, Continued. 495 

Education." His interest in school matters and great foresight 
appear in what follows: "1 fully agree that the frequent 
change of teachers is a great evil. It takes a long time before 
a new teacher learns the antecedent qualifications, the dispo- 
sition and talents of the scholars. The period during which a 
new teacher is making a reputation in the school room is always 
a critical period, the seldomer the experiment is tried the 
better for the schools. I am aware, however, that there are 
occasions, when even good teachers belonging to a religious 
community must be changed, but I have always expressed the 
opinion that such changes should be made only when very 
necessary and as seldom as possible, it is our wish, therefore, 
that wherever possible steps be at once taken to provide for 
graded schools. In towns and cities of two or more Congre- 
gations, this can be done without any very great difficulty. 
Very few Congregations, even in large cities can support the 
different grades or departments required to give an advanced 
education; but by all the Congregations within a suitable 
distance uniting and supporting one advanced school, this 
great want can be supplied and the work can be done far better 
than is now sometimes attempted by divided and single-handed 
efforts. This necessity appears to be more pressing in regard 
to schools for advanced boys; and it is plain, that as our people 
acquire more wealth whereby they will be enabled to send 
their boys longer to school and require a higher grade of educa- 
tion than heretofore, this necessity will become more pressing 
and at the same time far more disastrous. Wherever then, in 
towns and cities it may be possible to establish a high school, 
priests should unite and work hand in hand to found and sup- 
port such a school. This is our wish, this is our positive order." 
Bishop Rademacher succeeded Bishop Dwenger in October, 
1893. He continued the policy of his predecessor concerning 
the schools, which continued to grow in numbers and increase 
in efficiency. During the first five years of his administration 
sixteen new schools were built, at an expense of over forty 
thousand dollars. He never spared himself when the interests 
of education were at stake and in spite of his arduous labors he 
would travel the length and breadth of his diocese, in order to 
encourage by his presence the efforts of the children at their 
commencement exercises. His splendid character and many 



496 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

most amiable qualities gained the deep love of his priests and 
they vied with each other in their efforts to satisfy his every 
wish. 

He was succeeded by the present Bishop, Right Rev. 
H. J. Alerding who became immediately known among the 
Priests as a most ardent school man. He found the Diocese 
no longer in its infancy, with the tide of immigration spent, 
and the schools therefore, could not be expected to increase in 
numbers by leaps and bounds as in the past. Nevertheless, 
under his loving and paternal care, his wise direction and 
enthusiastic devotion to the cause, the schools have improved 
their condition, have become more perfectly organized, and 
have vastly increased in efficiency. 

As a proof of his tender solicitude in this regard, he wrote 
a pastoral letter on vocation to the religious state. Among 
other things he says: "It is they (who enter the religious 
state), next to the priests who keep alive the faith and quicken 
the spiritual life of the Church. Pastors of souls will readily 
testify of what immense influence for good these religious are 
in parishes. Indeed, what would become of our schools if 
we had not these teachers. The vows they have taken qualify 
them in character and the special training received makes them 
the best educators for our children. The providence of God 
has given the Church these religious communities as an endow- 
ment upon which no money value can be put. There is not 
money enough on earth to furnish one religious. God's voca- 
tion alone and His grace together with faithful cooperation 
can train these religious, both brothers and sisters. * * * 
I wish to bring to your notice that the Church is being ham- 
pered in her work of educating her youth because the number 
of teachers, brothers and sisters is inadequate. 

"We have evidence that Catholic education has at last 
become the concerted work of the Church in this country. 
The schools are increasing everywhere, new schools are being 
organized and the attendance at the schools already existing 
is increasing wonderfully year by year. This is as it should 
be. Yet, though the work is increasing, the number of the 
workers is not increasing in proportion. The cry all over the 
land is: WE MUST HAVE MORE BROTHERS AND 
SISTERS TO TEACH OUR SCHOOLS. To carry on the 



Education, Continued. 497 

work of high schools for boys, the number of brothers is woe- 
fully deficient, out of all proportion to the number needed." 

School Board. — In 1879 Bishop Dwenger desiring to im- 
prove the condition of the schools and create a diocesan system, 
at the instance of Rev. J. H. Oechtering and the Rev. M. 
O'Reilly, established a diocesan school board composed of the 
following members: Very Rev. J. Benoit, President, Rev. 
M. O'Reilly, Secretary, Rev. W. Corby, C. S. C, Rev. E. 
Koenig, Rev. J. Rademacher, Rev. H. Meissner, Rev. J. H. 
Oechtering. The board resolved to prepare an annual report 
for the following reasons, which they expressed to the Bishop: 
"By means of a well prepared annual report. Right Rev, 
Bishop, it will be in your power to perceive at a glance what 
is being done for the education of Catholic youth in your 
diocese. In your hands are placed statistics from the most 
humble as well as the more opulent localities under your juris- 
diction, which may justify a timely reproof or elicit a word of 
encouraging approbation. You can learn where zeal begins 
to flag, or where charity begins to grow cold; for with indiffer- 
ence toward the Catholic education of youth begins the moral 
death of the Congregation. The Clergy of the diocese will be 
able to compare the effects of their charitable labors with those 
of their neighbors. The people are by no means indifferent to 
their best interests, and when they are once led to apprehend 
the untold blessings of a good Catholic school, the most difficult 
part of the Pastor's labor is ended." 

The Board also at the first meeting, considered the question 
of text books which they termed deplorably irregular, but did 
not deem it judicious to prescribe a uniform set of text books 
and command an immediate change. They thought the 
solution of this question should be left to the good judgment of 
the Pastors and Teachers for some years at least. A statistical 
report of forty-four schools giving the number of pupils, the 
number of teachers, the text books and the branches studied 
was published. A perusal of this report shows how much the 
schools differed from each other, and showed the wisdom of 
trying to gather these scattered units under diocesan direction. 
In its yearly reports the School Board turned its attention to 
the different phases of school work and made many valuable 
suggestions and attempted much needed reforms. 



498 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

Among the topics discussed and recommended were the 
necessity of estabhshing a system of examination for secular 
teachers, "we plainly see that the power for good, a well qual- 
ified teacher, should have in the Congregation and school room, 
is neutralized and more or less inoperative until he or she can 
exhibit the voucher of competency witnessed by the Episcopal 
seal. This cannot be brought about effectively and with all 
the exterior evidences of thoroughness and impartiality until 
the general system of examination is adopted, that must pass, 
in all its details, under the impartial eye of Episcopal juris- 
diction. 

"The necessity of avoiding too frequent changes of teachers. 

"Next to a high grade of qualifications in a teacher the 
most important point to be considered affecting the well-being 
of our schools, is, change of teachers. It is a high encomium 
on the ability of the many teachers employed in the diocesan 
schools up to the present time, when we assure you that for 
the one injury done by not promptly removing an incompetent 
teacher, ninety-nine evils have arisen from changes without 
apparent cause. 

"The division of the Diocese into districts. 

"We hope that you may consider the time near at hand 
when you can divide the diocese into districts, over each of 
which, you will appoint a competent priest, whose duty it will 
be to visit the schools, preside at examinations, and assist the 
School Board in carrying out your plans for the general good. 

"The establishment of graded schools. 

"However remote the completion of your hopes may be, 
in regard to establishing graded schools in towns and cities 
containing two or more Congregations, we would deem it very 
important should you be pleased to permit your views on the 
subject to be published for the instruction of all those, who 
may be expected to engage in this important undertaking. 

"Course of study for the Parochial Schools. 

"There are many reasons why this idea should be reduced 
to practice. Pastors and teachers will have an outline of the 
studies expected to be pursued in the Parish Schools. Parents 
will be enabled to see what their children should have accom- 
plished before they can be justly taken away from school, and 
pupils themselves will be able to determine their own standing 



Education, Continued. 499 

in the course, and will be thereby "encouraged to complete with 
honor the few years' order of study outlined for them. There 
will be always some exceptions to the best devised plans, but 
it is thought that a moderate and well arranged course of study 
presented to the schools, and followed as far as practicable will 
result in more general good than anything that may follow 
from the irregularity and indefmiteness that now pervades our 
schools. We present the following course for our parochial 
schools, not making it of obligation but indicative of what 
should be attempted to be done: 

"primary grade. 

"First Year, I. — Age of children 6 to 7 years. 

"Charts, primer, phonic spelling, primary spelling, first 
reader, drawing and printing or writing on slates. Verbal 
religious instructions. 

"Second Year 11. — Age of children 7 to 8 years. 

"Phonic spelling, verbal orthography, elementary arith- 
metic, second reader, drawing and printing or writing on slates. 
Verbal religious instructions. 

"Third Year 111. — Age of children 8 to 9 years. 

"Verbal and written orthography, mental arithmetic, 
primary arithmetic with book and slate, oral elementary 
geography, third reader. Catechism. 

"intermediate grade. 

"Fourth Year I. — Age of children 9 to 10 years. 

"Verbal and written orthography, arithmetic, mental and 
practical; oral grammar, oral geography, penmanship on paper, 
catechism, fourth reader. 

"Fifth Year 11. — Age of children 10 to 11 years. 

"Verbal and written orthography, simple dictation exer- 
cises, No. 2 geography, intermediate grammar, arithmetic, 
mental and practical, penmanship, fourth reader, catechism. 

"Sixth Year III. — First Communion Year-— Age of children 
11 to 12 years. 

"Written orthography, daily; No. 2 geography completed, 
intermediate grammar completed, arithmetic, mental and prac- 
tical; sacred historv, dictation exercises, fifth reader, catechism. 



500 The Diocese of Fort Wayne. 

"senior grade. 

"Seventh Year I.— Age of children 12 to 13 years. 

"Written orthography daily; grammar school speller, 
arithmetic, mental and practical completed. No. 3 geography, 
advanced grammar, sacred history, physiology (optional), 
original composition weekly, fifth reader, catechism. 

"Eighth Year II. — Confirmation Year. — Age of children 
13 to 14 years. 

"Grammar school speller completed, grammar completed 
(not including prosody). No. 3 geography completed, physiology 
(optional), U. S. History with written reviews of each lesson, 
percentage reviewed, bookkeeping (single entry), letter writing 
weekly; catechism." 

It will be noticed that this course of study divided the 
school period into eight years and three grades and defined 
the subjects to be pursued in the schools of the diocese. This 
was a valuable help, no doubt, in the establishment of more 
systematic study in the schools, and answered the purpose 
expressed by the members of the board of a line of separation 
between the Parochial schools and High schools. It also 
helped the children to know their position in the school and 
how many years they would be required to attend. As a 
course of study, however, its vagueness would prevent rather 
than assist uniformity in the schools, as each diflferent teacher 
would be free to interpret the amount to be learned in each 
grade according to his own ideas. This may be easily seen by 
comparison of any topic, say arithmetic in the fourth, fifth 
and sixth years. 

School Visitors. — Another very important matter was the 
division of the diocese into school districts and the appointment 
of priests to act as visitors. In 1882, six districts were created 
under the supervision of the Very Rev. J. Benoit, Rev. E. 
Koenig, Rev. John Oechtering and Rev. F. Koerdt, for the 
first district; of Rev. Henry Meissner for the second district; 
of Rev. E. P. Walters for the third; of Rev. Joseph Rademacher 
for the fourth; of Rev. August Oechtering for the fifth; of 
Rev. M. O'Reilly for the sixth. These Reverend Fathers were 
supposed to visit the schools assigned to them at least once a 
year and to render a report in writing to the School Board at 
its annual meeting. Their annual reports were to cover every 



Education, Continued. 501 

point pertaining to the improvement of the schools, the quali- 
fications of teachers, the progress and standing of pupils, the 
state of school buildings, the conveniences in the school rooms, 
the play-grounds and surroundings. In 1883 the School Board 
expressed the opinion that nothing could promise more valuable 
benefits than the division of the diocese into school districts 
and the appointment of school visitors. However, in that 
year there were no reports of the visitors, and it was decided 
to grant them another year's experience. As was to be ex- 
pected there was difficulty in obtaining complete and correct 
reports from the schools and Bishop Dwenger referred to the 
matter in the following terms: "The Bishop can command 
and does command that this duty be performed and the Bishop 
will personally take cognizance thereof and enforce it." At 
the meeting of the School Board in October, 1885, the "Visitors" 
presented a report showing the result of their work in visiting 
each school assigned them and holding examinations. These 
reports made manifest that the schools of the diocese were in 
a satisfactory condition. They informed the Board that in a 
number of instances these examination days were made a sort 
of holiday for the parents, who crowded into the halls and 
school rooms and manifested quite an interest in the proceed- 
ings and looked with much pleasure upon the invitation of 
their pastor to attend the school examinations. The Bo